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View Poll Results: What city/metro would you rather live in?
MSP 60 60.00%
PDX 40 40.00%
Voters: 100. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 05-08-2015, 10:08 AM
 
Location: San Diego
559 posts, read 510,517 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Port Pitt Ash View Post
Actually for this match up I'd say Seattle and Minneapolis are more closely related than Seattle and Portland. Kind of like a long lost twin raised by a different set parents.
Possibly for the specifics that the OP mentioned BUT....No, just no. Portland and Seattle are two of the most similar cities in the US. Same climate, same people, same vibe, same scenery, tend to support the same professional teams. Minneapolis really doesn't feel similar to the Northwest much at all. I don't understand the obsession with people trying to compare it to either Portland or Seattle. On paper it might look similar, but once you've spent significant time in the NW, you'll realize it is completely different than ANYTHING in the midwest.
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Old 05-08-2015, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 7,914,878 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dapper23 View Post
Possibly for the specifics that the OP mentioned BUT....No, just no. Portland and Seattle are two of the most similar cities in the US. Same climate, same people, same vibe, same scenery, tend to support the same professional teams. Minneapolis really doesn't feel similar to the Northwest much at all. I don't understand the obsession with people trying to compare it to either Portland or Seattle. On paper it might look similar, but once you've spent significant time in the NW, you'll realize it is completely different than ANYTHING in the midwest.
They can have eachother, the comparisons are made by others who know little about the regions. There IS a lot in common between the two, but I'll speak for MSP in that it really doesn't matter which city it's compared to -- few cities are truly equals.
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Old 05-08-2015, 11:33 AM
 
Location: San Diego
559 posts, read 510,517 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
They can have eachother, the comparisons are made by others who know little about the regions. There IS a lot in common between the two, but I'll speak for MSP in that it really doesn't matter which city it's compared to -- few cities are truly equals.
It just really seems that people from Minneapolis do not want to associate themselves with Midwest, and feel like their city belongs in the PNW or on the West Coast. At least on this site.
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Old 05-08-2015, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 7,914,878 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dapper23 View Post
It just really seems that people from Minneapolis do not want to associate themselves with Midwest, and feel like their city belongs in the PNW or on the West Coast. At least on this site.
That's not true at all. I think when it comes to trying to tie Mpls down with another "sister" city people have two choices: Midwestern cities like St. Louis, Pittsburgh (I know, "Eastern"), and Cleveland; or Western cities like Denver, San Diego, Portland or Seattle. In either event, there isn't a really solid match, but in many ways the Twin Cities have as much in common with its Western counterparts as its Midwestern/Eastern ones. If deciding between the two, a lot of people think Western before Midwest, but really only in that example. Minneapolis definitely thinks of itself as Midwestern but that doesn't mean it doesn't also stand out a bit as part of the greater Midwest -- most of which is part of the Rust Belt, which really just doesn't typify the city of Minneapolis very much (it's industrial in parts, but not heavy manufacturing and polluting industries).

Minneapolis doesn't want to be any particular city but itself. It's a weird hybrid between Western cities and Midwestern cities. I'd say Madison, Des Moines, Grand Rapids, Omaha and arguably KC are also hybrids.
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Old 05-08-2015, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,479 posts, read 7,708,485 times
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The most likable cities in the United States and in my opinion, the most popular cities in the country from what I notice everyone in actual life talk about are the mid-major cities of Seattle, Phoenix, Minneapolis, Denver, San Diego, Portland, Austin, Raleigh, Nashville, Tampa, San Antonio, Charlotte, and Orlando.

Phoenix, Orlando, and Tampa for a different reason than the rest of them, as they are popular places to retire or relocate to for the climate and housing availability. Charlotte and San Antonio each for different reasons than the others as well, these have stable job markets, affordable housing, and temperate climates but are not cool or have that edgy culture to them as the rest. The others are more for their cultures, progression, outdoorsy theme, safety, solid economies that are often invested in lucrative industries, among the like. So essentially those nearly 2 million - right before 5 million metropolitan areas.

I also think this is the tier of cities that will be seeing the biggest changes in the next 30 years, all of them or at least majority of them will become much bigger, congested, and popular cities.

Last edited by Facts Kill Rhetoric; 05-08-2015 at 03:32 PM..
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Old 05-08-2015, 03:23 PM
 
3,751 posts, read 3,476,972 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dapper23 View Post
Possibly for the specifics that the OP mentioned BUT....No, just no. Portland and Seattle are two of the most similar cities in the US. Same climate, same people, same vibe, same scenery, tend to support the same professional teams. Minneapolis really doesn't feel similar to the Northwest much at all. I don't understand the obsession with people trying to compare it to either Portland or Seattle. On paper it might look similar, but once you've spent significant time in the NW, you'll realize it is completely different than ANYTHING in the midwest.
For that matter, I don't think Vancouver BC is as similar to Seattle and Portland as people think either. It's definitely a Canadian city through and through.
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Old 05-08-2015, 03:24 PM
 
3,751 posts, read 3,476,972 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
That's not true at all. I think when it comes to trying to tie Mpls down with another "sister" city people have two choices: Midwestern cities like St. Louis, Pittsburgh (I know, "Eastern"), and Cleveland; or Western cities like Denver, San Diego, Portland or Seattle. In either event, there isn't a really solid match, but in many ways the Twin Cities have as much in common with its Western counterparts as its Midwestern/Eastern ones. If deciding between the two, a lot of people think Western before Midwest, but really only in that example. Minneapolis definitely thinks of itself as Midwestern but that doesn't mean it doesn't also stand out a bit as part of the greater Midwest -- most of which is part of the Rust Belt, which really just doesn't typify the city of Minneapolis very much (it's industrial in parts, but not heavy manufacturing and polluting industries).

Minneapolis doesn't want to be any particular city but itself. It's a weird hybrid between Western cities and Midwestern cities. I'd say Madison, Des Moines, Grand Rapids, Omaha and arguably KC are also hybrids.
I'd actually consider the North to be a region of its own. I'd say it spans the states of Montana, the Dakotas, Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin and the UP.
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Old 05-08-2015, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,479 posts, read 7,708,485 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mini-apple-less View Post
For that matter, I don't think Vancouver BC is as similar to Seattle and Portland as people think either. It's definitely a Canadian city through and through.
No, Vancouver is 100% Cascadia/Pacific Northwest through and through, even if it is in Canada.

It shares little to nothing culturally in common with Toronto, Calgary, Edmonton, Ottawa, Winnipeg, Halifax, and especially the cities of Quebec other than a national flag, represented politicians in Ottawa, and universal healthcare system. It shares much more in common with Seattle, Portland, and Victoria than anywhere else.

It is just a more diverse/cosmopolitan Pacific Northwestern city.
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Old 05-08-2015, 03:31 PM
 
3,751 posts, read 3,476,972 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red John View Post
No, Vancouver is 100% Cascadia/Pacific Northwest through and through, even if it is in Canada.

It shares little to nothing culturally in common with Toronto, Calgary, Edmonton, Ottawa, Winnipeg, Halifax, and especially the cities of Quebec other than a national flag, represented politicians in Ottawa, and universal healthcare system. It shares much more in common with Seattle, Portland, and Victoria than anywhere else.

It is just a more diverse/cosmopolitan Pacific Northwestern city.
Nah, I've been to Ontario and it reminded me very much of British Columbia, aside from the lack of mountains and different climate and vegetation. Portland and Seattle have a sleepiness that one doesn't feel in Vancouver, it's hard to explain. Plus things like friendship and family ties BC shares FAR more with other Canadian provinces, including provinces in eastern Canada, than it does with the American states to the south.
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Old 05-08-2015, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,479 posts, read 7,708,485 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mini-apple-less View Post
Nah, I've been to Ontario and it reminded me very much of British Columbia, aside from the lack of mountains and different climate and vegetation. Portland and Seattle have a sleepiness that one doesn't feel in Vancouver, it's hard to explain. Plus things like friendship and family ties BC shares FAR more with other Canadian provinces, including provinces in eastern Canada, than it does with the American states to the south.
Fair enough.

It would make for an excellent thread topic of its own on City-Data, a site that has seen redundancy in its thread topics over the years.
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