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View Poll Results: What is the Midwest's second city/metropolis?
Greater Detroit 65 41.67%
Greater Minneapolis/Saint Paul 91 58.33%
Voters: 156. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-26-2015, 09:26 PM
 
Location: District of Columbia
737 posts, read 1,363,681 times
Reputation: 465

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Quote:
Originally Posted by usroute10 View Post
Let's bring this thread back to a serious, objective discussion...




The Joe Louis Memorial




The SPIRIT of Detroit



Those sculptures are awesome! I've seen them several times.

 
Old 05-26-2015, 10:01 PM
 
Location: Carver County, MN
1,395 posts, read 2,071,148 times
Reputation: 1223
The Guardian Building has to be one of my favorite buildings of all time. Too bad Minneapolis can't have a building like that.
The Penobscot Building looks like a larger identical twin to the 1st Bank Building in St. Paul.

For the Twin Cities don't forget about the St. Paul Cathedral, Capitol Building and of course the Mary Tyler Moore Statue.
 
Old 05-27-2015, 07:50 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 7,921,566 times
Reputation: 4213
Quote:
Originally Posted by Indentured Servant View Post
Let me say that I think Detroit represents "the real economy". The state of the Detroit region, I believe, is a microcosm of the TRUE health of our nation. Keep in mind that the Detroit region cannot print money.and does not have in infinite buyer of bonds the governments issue to finance its spending and keep the region afloat, like the US government does. I say that because people will note that the national economy was being doing a lot better than the Detroit area economy. Well, that is because of a 17 trillion debt, 50 trillion in unfunded liabilities and the FED buying of securities issued by the government to keep things stimulated and the result of the FED zero interest rate policy. Without all that debt and manipulation, the US economy would mirror the Detroit area economy.

Manufacturing is the REAL economy, in my opinion. Manufacturing "puts meat and muscle on your bones", drawing analogy to a human diet. It's the "protein" of the economy. Read this article.

As I pointed out before, if Detroit's major companies collapse, the national economy would be impacted much more than if the major corporations of Minneapolis collapsed. How can Minneapolis even be considered the second most influential and important region in the Midwest when Detroit's economy is more important to the US economy than is Minneapolis? More important economy, larger economy in terms of GDP of the GREATER areas, 2 million more people in the GREATER areas, Greater impact in terms of international trade and a much greater exporting economy.

As I said before......its basically cultural that you all are really ranking. If you like Minneapolis.....if that is your model....then no you will probably not like a metro area why a hyper black majority occupying the urban core....and for that reason....more than anything else....is why most whites would consider Minneapolis the second city.
Two things:

1. I think you underestimate a.) the MSP economy, and b.) its worldly influence. Cargill, for example, is a MEGA foods and agricultural company that supplies half the world with meats and grains. It's immensely important and if it were to ever fail, wow.....

2. The MSP region is pretty "manufacturing"-intensive, as that word is defined in looser terms (including light manufacturing). It might be a larger center for manufacturing that Detroit, even though nobody would typically consider MSP the bigger manufacturer of the two. Let me see if I can dig up the source where I'm pulling that info from.

Finally, I'd like to reiterate that I feel DET is deserving of the #2 spot, especially as long as the two economies are neck-and-neck like they currently are.
 
Old 05-27-2015, 08:01 AM
 
Location: In the heights
20,134 posts, read 21,745,742 times
Reputation: 10223
Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
Two things:

1. I think you underestimate a.) the MSP economy, and b.) its worldly influence. Cargill, for example, is a MEGA foods and agricultural company that supplies half the world with meats and grains. It's immensely important and if it were to ever fail, wow.....

2. The MSP region is pretty "manufacturing"-intensive, as that word is defined in looser terms (including light manufacturing). It might be a larger center for manufacturing that Detroit, even though nobody would typically consider MSP the bigger manufacturer of the two. Let me see if I can dig up the source where I'm pulling that info from.

Finally, I'd like to reiterate that I feel DET is deserving of the #2 spot, especially as long as the two economies are neck-and-neck like they currently are.
Yea, the Twin Cities is a major food processing center in the world. It's definitely industrial production, but whether or not it falls under "manufacturing" is questionable. However, it's not as if the Twin Cities has an economy that isn't labor dependent at all or doesn't result in the production of tangible products. What makes the Twin Cities economically healthier is that it has a diverse economy with that as a large, but not overwhelming component of its economy.

Cargill is massive. It's the largest privately held corporation in the US--if it were public, it would be about the size of Ford Motor Company.
 
Old 05-27-2015, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,479 posts, read 7,717,281 times
Reputation: 7295
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
I don't see how anyone logically could pull Grand Rapids into Detroit's region. It's 150 miles from Metro Detroit and most people from the Detroit area don't know anything about it. That makes no sense.
Someone tried it anyway:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Indentured Servant View Post
It is, 300 mile radius, important based upon the criteria of which area is more important.
See, it makes no sense. This argument doesn't really have any place for radius miles, I don't even understand how that metric is relevant to the discussion between these two areas personally but whatever works I guess.
 
Old 05-27-2015, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Detroit
3,626 posts, read 4,349,804 times
Reputation: 2513
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red John View Post
Someone tried it anyway:

See, it makes no sense. This argument doesn't really have any place for radius miles, I don't even understand how that metric is relevant to the discussion between these two areas personally but whatever works I guess.
I think the point he was trying to make was basically, Metro Detroit's population is under counted. Metro Detroit is larger than the commuting pattern statistics which is true. All the way to Grand Rapids is a stretch I agree but a smaller radius could tell you the real number of people in an area, say like an hour radius of the central city.
 
Old 05-27-2015, 04:18 PM
 
1,168 posts, read 1,179,711 times
Reputation: 983
Quote:
Originally Posted by usroute10 View Post
Detroit has also more awesomer buildings/skyscrapers:

Can Minneapolis/Saint Paul hold its own? Minneapolis City Hall is spectacular. The Foshay Tower, meh. The Wells Fargo or Capella Tower are impressive modern skyscrapers. But the Twin Cities signature building may be...a mall?
I'm convinced because you used awesomer and included the Mall of America within your argument. Good job.
 
Old 05-27-2015, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Twin Cities (StP)
3,007 posts, read 1,709,643 times
Reputation: 2293
I am just here to argue with a turd from Detroit.
 
Old 05-27-2015, 08:20 PM
 
5,316 posts, read 6,614,341 times
Reputation: 2649
Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post

Cargill is massive. It's the largest privately held corporation in the US--if it were public, it would be about the size of Ford Motor Company.

Bosch is the largest privately held company in the US.
 
Old 05-27-2015, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Carver County, MN
1,395 posts, read 2,071,148 times
Reputation: 1223
Quote:
Originally Posted by ram2 View Post
Bosch is the largest privately held company in the US.
Bosch is a German company.
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