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View Poll Results: What is the Midwest's second city/metropolis?
Greater Detroit 65 41.67%
Greater Minneapolis/Saint Paul 91 58.33%
Voters: 156. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 05-31-2015, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Westside Grand Rapids
3,572 posts, read 3,052,263 times
Reputation: 5500

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghengis View Post
probably last summer (just like every summer) when one of the multitude of Minnesota-bred NHLers of that year's SCC brought it home to show the neighbors and take it fishing with the buddies.

(I was wondering when this thread would get on to what really matters)



likely that more Minnesotans have done that than Michiganders

plus we got more lakes

I really don't care what people think is the Midwest 2nd city. But this statement is a pet peeve of mine and I see it a lot on here.

Minnesota covers 23,000 more square miles of land than Michigan, that's 40% greater land mass. Minnesota was formed by the same glacial recession that also shaped Michigan, OF COURSE it's going to have more lakes. They both have a staggering number of in-land lakes in them when compared to the rest of the country. Michigan is literally more than 40% water when you factor in total area. I am a Minnesotan by birth, and a Michigander by choice. There is little to no difference between the states ecologically when it comes to water, save for Michigan's thousands of miles of coastline. Someone needs to do a study about the number of lakes per square miles in the states and I doubt there'd be much difference at all.

I wish Minnesotans would stop clinging to this as if it were the singular source of pride in such a phenomenal state. Y'all are like second graders bantering over who's dad is stronger.

 
Old 05-31-2015, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Miami Beach, FL/Tokyo, Japan
1,699 posts, read 1,484,867 times
Reputation: 699
The "lakes" that Minnesota have are ugly, they look like ponds. Except of course for Lake Superior. When I was in Minneapolis, someone took me to Lake Calhoun and I couldn't even bring myself to dip my foot into the water. It looked muddy, dirty, and full of insects.

Even Lake St Clair (not a great a lake that is in the Detroit Metro) is far nicer. Sometimes we have to go for quality over quantity.
 
Old 05-31-2015, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Detroit
3,626 posts, read 4,359,014 times
Reputation: 2513
Quote:
Originally Posted by DistrictSonic View Post
The twin cities. Detroit is a hell hole that people from Chicago and everywhere else in the great lakes look down on. The twin cities is a great place to live, if you can tolerate the weather. This isn't even close.
Yeah, 5+ million people live in a hell hole that has one of the largest economies in America, one of the highest income to COL ratios, some of the wealthiest communities, a large variety of different areas and many areas if not most are safer than the national average btw, a strong culture, many things to see and do, oh and let's not forget, a hell hole with a growing population and growing economy and even the greater downtown area is growing now.

And it's funny how the great lakes look down upon Detroit when MANY people from all over the great lakes/ Midwest come to Detroit for it's offerings. In fact, go see how many people from the rest of the great lakes came to Detroit last weekend.

So if you can't come up with any smart and well thought out reasons to pick Minny and have a mature discussion about it than just shut up and keep watching your media that shows maybe 10% of Metro Detroit because it's obvious that you don't know what the hell your talking about.
 
Old 05-31-2015, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Twin Cities (StP)
3,007 posts, read 1,716,159 times
Reputation: 2294
Quote:
Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
The "lakes" that Minnesota have are ugly, they look like ponds. Except of course for Lake Superior. When I was in Minneapolis, someone took me to Lake Calhoun and I couldn't even bring myself to dip my foot into the water. It looked muddy, dirty, and full of insects.

Even Lake St Clair (not a great a lake that is in the Detroit Metro) is far nicer. Sometimes we have to go for quality over quantity.
Really??? You use Lake Calhoun (the ugliest lake in the state) to generalize all (~12,000) of the Minnesota lakes?
 
Old 05-31-2015, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
1,192 posts, read 1,039,756 times
Reputation: 2089
Quote:
Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
The "lakes" that Minnesota have are ugly, they look like ponds. Except of course for Lake Superior. When I was in Minneapolis, someone took me to Lake Calhoun and I couldn't even bring myself to dip my foot into the water. It looked muddy, dirty, and full of insects.
My god. Please, SDPMiami. Lake Calhoun's a "dirty pond"? Really?

Any fool knows Minnesota's lakes are the state's pride and joy. Here are just a few of these "dirty pond" lakes right in the Twin Cities metro area, some right in Minneapolis proper (all photos are my own):

Lake Harriet (Minneapolis):







Lake of the Isles/Lake Calhoun (Minneapolis):




Lake Minnetonka:

















Lake Waconia:





White Bear Lake:





Look at how muddy and disgusting all of those lakes are.

By the way, every single lake in the WORLD not destroyed by toxic pollution is full of insects. Every. Single. One.
 
Old 05-31-2015, 11:33 PM
 
Location: Michigan
4,571 posts, read 6,753,423 times
Reputation: 3589
Quote:
Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
The "lakes" that Minnesota have are ugly, they look like ponds. Except of course for Lake Superior. When I was in Minneapolis, someone took me to Lake Calhoun and I couldn't even bring myself to dip my foot into the water. It looked muddy, dirty, and full of insects.

Even Lake St Clair (not a great a lake that is in the Detroit Metro) is far nicer. Sometimes we have to go for quality over quantity.
There's nothing really special about Lake St. Clair that would make it any different than any other lakes being compared here.

If anything, the things that stand out about it are kind of drawbacks; 1) There's fast undercurrents and only a few areas a long the shoreline where you can safely swim in the water without being swept downstream, 2) there's a lot of boat traffic, especially including freighters which only churn the water even more, 3) most of the shoreline isn't even publicly accessible due to so much private development.

Then from a boater's perspective, because of the currents and wave action, it's actually not that desirable of a lake to have your boat sitting in unless you have a fairly large boat. Even a light wind could keep many small boats docked in protected marinas. Plus if you spend too much time crossing/wandering near the border, you can pretty much guarantee investigation by the border patrol, and can even get a hefty fine for not having certain ID.

Size =/= quality.
 
Old 06-01-2015, 06:42 AM
 
Location: Westside Grand Rapids
3,572 posts, read 3,052,263 times
Reputation: 5500
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennifat View Post
My god. Please, SDPMiami. Lake Calhoun's a "dirty pond"? Really?

Any fool knows Minnesota's lakes are the state's pride and joy. Here are just a few of these "dirty pond" lakes right in the Twin Cities metro area, some right in Minneapolis proper (all photos are my own):

Lake Harriet (Minneapolis):







Lake of the Isles/Lake Calhoun (Minneapolis):




Lake Minnetonka:

















Lake Waconia:





White Bear Lake:





Look at how muddy and disgusting all of those lakes are.

By the way, every single lake in the WORLD not destroyed by toxic pollution is full of insects. Every. Single. One.
Looks like Michigan how shocking.
 
Old 06-01-2015, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
20,344 posts, read 20,481,703 times
Reputation: 31603
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
I really don't care what people think is the Midwest 2nd city. But this statement is a pet peeve of mine and I see it a lot on here.

Minnesota covers 23,000 more square miles of land than Michigan, that's 40% greater land mass. Minnesota was formed by the same glacial recession that also shaped Michigan, OF COURSE it's going to have more lakes. They both have a staggering number of in-land lakes in them when compared to the rest of the country. Michigan is literally more than 40% water when you factor in total area. I am a Minnesotan by birth, and a Michigander by choice. There is little to no difference between the states ecologically when it comes to water, save for Michigan's thousands of miles of coastline. Someone needs to do a study about the number of lakes per square miles in the states and I doubt there'd be much difference at all.

I wish Minnesotans would stop clinging to this as if it were the singular source of pride in such a phenomenal state. Y'all are like second graders bantering over who's dad is stronger.
^classic example of lake envy
 
Old 06-01-2015, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Miami Beach, FL/Tokyo, Japan
1,699 posts, read 1,484,867 times
Reputation: 699
Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
There's nothing really special about Lake St. Clair that would make it any different than any other lakes being compared here.
For starters Lake St. Clair never grossed me out. Its beachfront is not muddy like Lake Calhoun.

For later, I spent part of my life on the lake St Clair, and we sailed constantly. Including small boats like FJs and Lasers. I don't remember anything about fast moving currents. I think you're overstating.

But I'm not going to sit here and say Lake St. Clair is nice, because well it isn't. Just pointing out that most of Minnesota's 12,000 lakes aren't nice and nothing worth to brag about. Michigan at least borders almost every great lake but one. And when it comes to shoreline of the 3 heavy hitters (Lake Superior, Lake Michigan, Lake Huron) Michigan has more than any other US state.

Anyways, Jennifat what you posted, many of it did look like ponds to me. The view from my place with my fiancee in the way for comparison, also taken by me:

 
Old 06-01-2015, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
1,192 posts, read 1,039,756 times
Reputation: 2089
Quote:
Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
Anyways, Jennifat what you posted, many of it did look like ponds to me.
You must be blind, then. This is what a pond looks like (my own photo):

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