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View Poll Results: Your favorite of the three?
Atlanta 46 38.33%
Miami 31 25.83%
Mexico City 43 35.83%
Voters: 120. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-14-2015, 12:51 PM
 
Location: In the heights
21,921 posts, read 23,494,618 times
Reputation: 11522

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Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
It should be noted that many people who have never been to Atlanta or even those who have little experience being there,think Atlanta is all new and "sterile".This simply is not true.

There are streetcar neighborhoods designed by Fredrick Law Olmsted his firm(Central Park NYC)and parks that date to the late 1800's as well as other neighborhoods that were around since the Civil War although little is left visibly the history is there.

Of curse it cant hold a candle to Mexico City BUT there is a visible history.
Definitely more than Miami which really only dates back to the 40's-50's and has far less of a history on a national scale than Atlanta.

Combine that with the physical natural beauty of a city in the foothills of mountains in a subtropical like climate it very beautiful.
I love driving in my convertible with the top down on a summer night and I smell the magnolias and honeysuckle every where.
Sure it gets hot but the last few summers have not been so humid or oppressive as they were when I was younger
If you're going by visible history, then the gap between Mexico City and Atlanta dwarfs the gap between Atlanta and Miami. Also, I'd be a bit more forgiving to Miami and the area--its first really big building boom was in the 1920s and quite a lot of it was actually preserved. And while Miami probably doesn't have historical buildings as old as Atlanta's with most historic buildings being from the 1920s and a scattershot of buildings from the latter half of the 19th century, it seems to have been better at conserving large portions of what it does have and leaving it mostly intact.

 
Old 05-14-2015, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,086 posts, read 13,252,024 times
Reputation: 2929
Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
If you're going by visible history, then the gap between Mexico City and Atlanta dwarfs the gap between Atlanta and Miami. Also, I'd be a bit more forgiving to Miami and the area--its first really big building boom was in the 1920s and quite a lot of it was actually preserved. And while Miami doesn't have historical buildings as old as Atlanta's, it seems to have been better at conserving large portions of what it does have and leaving it mostly intact.
.

Im not sure about that.Atlanta core and neighborhoods are intact.Atlanta was that big whe it was burned during the Civil War but even still many of its buildings were lost.
Well yeah.Of course you can't compare Mexico City and its visible history to Atlanta.Its no contest

Atlanta like many cities lost some great buildings but much of its architecture from the 20's is still around.From te FoX Therater and Georgian Terrace to some buildings like the FlatIron Building and William Oliver building
 
Old 05-14-2015, 04:54 PM
 
Location: In the heights
21,921 posts, read 23,494,618 times
Reputation: 11522
Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
.

Im not sure about that.Atlanta core and neighborhoods are intact.Atlanta was that big whe it was burned during the Civil War but even still many of its buildings were lost.
Well yeah.Of course you can't compare Mexico City and its visible history to Atlanta.Its no contest

Atlanta like many cities lost some great buildings but much of its architecture from the 20's is still around.From te FoX Therater and Georgian Terrace to some buildings like the FlatIron Building and William Oliver building
No you can't compare Mexico City with the other two, but I think Atlanta and Miami are pretty comparable if you're talking about anything from the 20s on down since Miami had a massive building boom then. You have the large Art Deco area of South Beach, large midrise buildings downtown, oddities like Villa Viscaya and Coral Castle among others.

Miami, is in a lot of ways, a more international and cosmopolitan city than Atlanta and arguably more so than Mexico City. Miami's also a slightly larger MSA and CSA (by just a smidgen, but the lead is growing) with what feels to me more walkable areas compared to Atlanta.
 
Old 05-14-2015, 11:50 PM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,086 posts, read 13,252,024 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
No you can't compare Mexico City with the other two, but I think Atlanta and Miami are pretty comparable if you're talking about anything from the 20s on down since Miami had a massive building boom then. You have the large Art Deco area of South Beach, large midrise buildings downtown, oddities like Villa Viscaya and Coral Castle among others.

Miami, is in a lot of ways, a more international and cosmopolitan city than Atlanta and arguably more so than Mexico City. Miami's also a slightly larger MSA and CSA (by just a smidgen, but the lead is growing) with what feels to me more walkable areas compared to Atlanta.
If by name recognition you mean,yes Miami is more international but by any measure else you are just playing favorites.

I never understand how Atlanta get overlooked for its international aspects.Miami has Hispanics and Europeans.
Atlanta has Africans and Asians.At least double more Asians than Miami.Atlanta a high concentration of Carribean immigrants too.Of course not like Miami but its usually ranks high in number of people from that region.

As far as being cosmopolitan I personally dont see it.The average person in Atlanta is better educated and wealthier.I suppose because Miami has such a high number of HNWI that somehow is suppose to make up for its higher poverty rate,low graduation rates and lower median income.
A 'cosmopolitan" city should be worldly in its offerings but Miami is so "Latin-Centric" or "Spanish-Centric"Just because it attracts many nationalities does not make it "cosmopolitan"automatically.


You keep talking about how Miami has its preservation due to its building boom in the 20's but I cant think of anybody that would see Miami as a city of nothing more than mainly cookie cutter condo towers and a cool Art Decor District with a few select 1920's style grand hotel buildings here and there.Its only looks great because of its density an its on water.

You say from"the 20's onward" they compare but thats cutting more than 70 years off Atlanta's history.
Neighborhoods like Grant Park,Candler and Inman Park,Cabbagetown and Westend all have wonderful streets with homes dating back to the late 1800's.Miami has no real history that dates that far back.Its significant
 
Old 05-15-2015, 12:13 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,088 posts, read 13,423,088 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by waronxmas View Post
By your signature I'm guessing you are an expat. Yeah, the same rules don't apply to American expats at any income level. I used to live in the 3rd world for several years on a very modest income by American standards...and I might as well have been a rockstar. The COL differences alone make for a very easy life, but even the free perks that come along with being an American expat are priceless. If you don't have the ability to self-reflect on why it is you have a good life down there, I can't help with that.
I don't really like the word expat because it implies a really Anglo-centric designation when everyone else is just an immigrant.

I have little doubt you assume all sorts of things about my class status, financial situation, connections, job, etc., but I'm not some retiree with a savings account who has all these US resident connections. But believe what you want.
 
Old 05-15-2015, 12:26 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,088 posts, read 13,423,088 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
That was a run on sentence.I said earlier the poverty rate was 40% and it had an extremely high homeless population.Particularly street children which apparently are highly visible.

Some articles say over 1 million homeless children like this article.


https://www.baptiststandard.com/reso...eeds-in-mexico

As it has already been said:Mexico has no concrete stats but it widely know worldwide that it is a major problem no matter how much you wish to hide it.
I have never been to Rio De Jinero but it too has worse problems than Mexico City but I want to there because of the culture and history but aint no way in hell I would EVER want to live there.

You can bring up Atlanta all you want.truth is it is far from a perfect city but Atlanta is not vastly different from many cities in America and to be poor in America is not being as poor in Mexico and you know it or if you dont then you need a reality check.
Ah yes, when I want information without sources, I go to Baptist Standard. What next, a claim of 50 million rapes courtesy of Weekly World News?

Let's be honest, you have convinced yourself that Mexico City is terribly beneath you and you validate that position with trash beliefs. I'm the one living here on the ground. I'm the one facing whatever real problems exist because I see them. You don't have to tell me what they are, I see them every day. But you are so far off base and out of your league on this. But by all means, believe what you want. If C-D is known for anything, it's all the armchair experts.
 
Old 05-15-2015, 12:28 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,088 posts, read 13,423,088 times
Reputation: 5756
Quote:
Originally Posted by RudyOD View Post
Oh, please. The people posting facts about homelessness and poverty are clueless. If someone actually had the OPTION to live in any one of these cities, with actual job prospects, they can probably choose to live in a decent neighborhood. LA, NYC, San Francisco all have huge homeless problems that are only escalating due to stagnant wages, a dwindling middle class and skyrocketing mortgages and rents. So, what...if I said I was moving to SF people would assume I would become a homeless man in the Tenderloin? If I moved to LA would I be forced to live in Skid Row?

The same goes for Mexico City...which has many, many incredibly gorgeous neighborhoods with such history and character that Atlanta and Miami could only dream of. I would gladly choose live in La Condesa or Roma Norte over Miami Beach any day, and twice on Sundays. Not to mention the art and culture of the city. Not that Miami or Atlanta are lacking, but they don't have the depth of Mexico city in cultural amenities that only certain places in the world can match, such as Paris and Istanbul.

I really like the neighborhood profiles that AirBnB has for different cities. Here are some of Mexico City's:

https://www.airbnb.com/locations/mexico-city/condesa

https://www.airbnb.com/locations/mexico-city/roma-norte

https://www.airbnb.com/locations/mexico-city/hipodromo

I understand my preference in neighborhoods is highly subjective, but so is everyone's so far.

Here is Miami and its nabes: https://www.airbnb.com/locations/miami

Unfortunately Atlanta isn't really one of AirBnB's top destinations so there aren't any sleek neighborhood profiles to browse through. If anyone has any blogs that have picture guides of some of your favorite Atlanta nabes, it would be sweet to share it to both highlight the best of Atlanta and to compare to Miami and Mexico City.
All the people in those photos are homeless crack dealers, obviously.
 
Old 05-15-2015, 12:41 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,088 posts, read 13,423,088 times
Reputation: 5756
Quote:
Originally Posted by n3wt View Post
I meant more that you saw a lack of graffiti as a good thing. I'm a big fan of graffiti and see it as a positive. I find areas in cities without any graffiti at all a little bit sterile.
MC has a ton of amazing street art. It's hard to find a single street without some, and I don't mean just dumb kids spray painting their names. The two areas of the city I can think of that don't have a lot of that are two areas I find pretty lame. They tend to be upper-middle class/rich areas filled with people who think they're better than everyone else.

Last edited by jbcmh81; 05-15-2015 at 01:12 AM..
 
Old 05-15-2015, 02:43 AM
 
6,611 posts, read 6,892,441 times
Reputation: 4071
Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
If you're going by visible history, then the gap between Mexico City and Atlanta dwarfs the gap between Atlanta and Miami. Also, I'd be a bit more forgiving to Miami and the area--its first really big building boom was in the 1920s and quite a lot of it was actually preserved. And while Miami probably doesn't have historical buildings as old as Atlanta's with most historic buildings being from the 1920s and a scattershot of buildings from the latter half of the 19th century, it seems to have been better at conserving large portions of what it does have and leaving it mostly intact.
I have never found anything in Miami like Fairlie-Poplar: Fairlie-Poplar, Atlanta - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Miami has some great Art Deco areas, but Atlanta has dozens of historic neighborhoods surrounding the historic districts in core areas of downtown and Midtown...and even in Atlanta's suburbs you almost always find a historic downtown with surrounding historic neighborhoods. I haven't seen anything in Miami that stands up to the historic buildings and home in Atlanta outside of Miami Beach. I know there are other historic areas, but they pale in comparison to those in Atlanta.
 
Old 05-15-2015, 09:23 AM
 
Location: The Greatest city on Earth: City of Atlanta Proper
7,899 posts, read 12,131,005 times
Reputation: 5692
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
I don't really like the word expat because it implies a really Anglo-centric designation when everyone else is just an immigrant.

I have little doubt you assume all sorts of things about my class status, financial situation, connections, job, etc., but I'm not some retiree with a savings account who has all these US resident connections. But believe what you want.
If you are an American citizen who moved to Mexico and didn't renig on your citizenship, but is planning on staying in Mexico for a long time, you are an expat. That's not a judgement, that's reality despite the fact that I understand your point about the usual Anglo-centric view of that word.

And yes, I am assuming a lot about you (perhaps you can share to provide context as it would be interesting topic to the conversation), but I spent many years as an non-Anglo expat (I'm blasian) in Asia to further my career. On my first full day of overseas residence, it was as clear as day that the rules that applied to everyone else didn't apply to me. I don't want to judge you, but from your posts it seems as if you do not see the correlation between your current QOL in Mexico and being an American, no matter your economic bracket.

But please, feel free to elaborate. I do not aim to discount the personal experience of any person.
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