U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: What are Greater Indianapolis & Greater Columbus' ceilings in the Midwest over the course of the
They will surpass all places in the Midwest in population and economy except for Chicago, Detroit, and the Twin Cities 29 39.73%
They will settle somewhere in the mid-range and wont ever completely surpass Cleveland or Saint Louis 24 32.88%
They will stay where they are now as relative upstarts 11 15.07%
They will decline and lose ground in the future 4 5.48%
They will even surpass Chicago, Detroit, and the Twin Cities (CSAs) 1 1.37%
Other 4 5.48%
Voters: 73. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-20-2015, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,765 posts, read 12,741,891 times
Reputation: 5440

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dyadic View Post
The state of Ohio also has nearly 5 million more people than Indiana. The metro population of both Cincinnati and Columbus is around 4.5 million. The combined metro population of Cleveland, Cincinnati and Columbus is over 8 million people which is nearly 4 times the metro population of Indy. Also The Region (Northwest Indiana) is the second largest urban center in the state and it part of the Chicago metro area. It also central time zone the same as Chicago. Indy is eastern time zone. Indy outperforms Columbus economically. It is just that simple.
Uh, no. The combined metro populations of the 3 would be about 6.25 million, not over 8. Columbus was at 1.99, Cincinnati at 2.23 and Cleveland at 2.06 in the most recent estimate.

You're still concentrating the majority of the states economy in a single place. Indiana's GDP was 317.102 billion in 2013. Indianapolis had a GDP that year of 126.472 billion, meaning Indianapolis was responsible for 39.9% of the entire state's economy.

Ohio, by comparison, had a 2013 GDP of 565.272 billion and Columbus had a GDP of 114.253 billion, meaning Columbus was only responsible for 20.2% of the state's GDP. Cleveland and Cincinnati were responsible for 21.7% and 21.1%, respectively. It's very obvious that Indianapolis is Indiana's primary economic driver while in Ohio, that role is almost equally divided among its 3 principle cities (and further divided by several medium-sized cities). Indianapolis has no competition in the state. Columbus does.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-20-2015, 10:40 AM
 
1,480 posts, read 1,287,072 times
Reputation: 1486
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
Uh, no. The combined metro populations of the 3 would be about 6.25 million, not over 8. Columbus was at 1.99, Cincinnati at 2.23 and Cleveland at 2.06 in the most recent estimate.

You're still concentrating the majority of the states economy in a single place. Indiana's GDP was 317.102 billion in 2013. Indianapolis had a GDP that year of 126.472 billion, meaning Indianapolis was responsible for 39.9% of the entire state's economy.

Ohio, by comparison, had a 2013 GDP of 565.272 billion and Columbus had a GDP of 114.253 billion, meaning Columbus was only responsible for 20.2% of the state's GDP. Cleveland and Cincinnati were responsible for 21.7% and 21.1%, respectively. It's very obvious that Indianapolis is Indiana's primary economic driver while in Ohio, that role is almost equally divided among its 3 principle cities (and further divided by several medium-sized cities). Indianapolis has no competition in the state. Columbus does.
You're correct. I was looking at a combined statistical area chart which has the 3 cities a population base over 8 million (Cleveland 3,497,711, Cincinnati 2,188,001, and Columbus 2,348,495) compared to Indy's 2,310,360. That's a huge difference. While it is true Indy doesn't have competition within the state but it does have it outside the state (Chicago). Also Indiana has a much smaller population base to draw from. Ohio population is 11,594,163 compared to Indiana 6,596,855 ... that's a noticeable difference. Btw, Chicago and Minneapolis and Detroit lack instate competition which is never mentioned. Regardless of all the above Indy still outperforms Columbus economically.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-20-2015, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,765 posts, read 12,741,891 times
Reputation: 5440
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dyadic View Post
You're correct. I was looking at a combined statistical area chart which has the 3 cities a population base over 8 million (Cleveland 3,497,711, Cincinnati 2,188,001, and Columbus 2,348,495) compared to Indy's 2,310,360. That's a huge difference. While it is true Indy doesn't have competition within the state but it does have it outside the state (Chicago). Also Indiana has a much smaller population base to draw from. Ohio population is 11,594,163 compared to Indiana 6,596,855 ... that's a noticeable difference. Btw, Chicago and Minneapolis and Detroit lack instate competition which is never mentioned. Regardless of all the above Indy still outperforms Columbus economically.
Probably because the thread isn't really about those 3 other cities, but it's also obvious that those cities dominate their state economies.

For now. The gap closed a bit since 2010, and the city/metro grew faster in population at the last estimate, so things may be on the verge of changing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-21-2015, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Westside Grand Rapids
3,570 posts, read 3,035,151 times
Reputation: 5492
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dyadic View Post
You're correct. I was looking at a combined statistical area chart which has the 3 cities a population base over 8 million (Cleveland 3,497,711, Cincinnati 2,188,001, and Columbus 2,348,495) compared to Indy's 2,310,360. That's a huge difference. While it is true Indy doesn't have competition within the state but it does have it outside the state (Chicago). Also Indiana has a much smaller population base to draw from. Ohio population is 11,594,163 compared to Indiana 6,596,855 ... that's a noticeable difference. Btw, Chicago and Minneapolis and Detroit lack instate competition which is never mentioned. Regardless of all the above Indy still outperforms Columbus economically.
The Detroit area is less than half of Michigan's population (45%) it's population is quite spread out. Which is not comparable to The Twin cities and Chicagoland which by far dominate their states demographics.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-21-2015, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Washington, DC area
10,705 posts, read 18,488,746 times
Reputation: 5405
Indy can pass whoever they want on paper with whatever stats you want to use, but it will never pass most of the other major cities in the midwest from a built urban environment, amenities and cultural standpoint in my opinion.

Indy will always be a tier below places like MSP, STL, Cleveland etc and even places like KC and Cincy are going to remain a step above Indy for the foreseeable future regardless of GDP and CSA population.

And I can't believe Chicago is even part of the conversation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-21-2015, 03:06 PM
 
1,480 posts, read 1,287,072 times
Reputation: 1486
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcmo View Post
Indy can pass whoever they want on paper with whatever stats you want to use, but it will never pass most of the other major cities in the midwest from a built urban environment, amenities and cultural standpoint in my opinion.

Indy will always be a tier below places like MSP, STL, Cleveland etc and even places like KC and Cincy are going to remain a step above Indy for the foreseeable future regardless of GDP and CSA population.

And I can't believe Chicago is even part of the conversation.
Your operative phrase is "in my opinion". Mention Indianapolis and you are sure to spit venom.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-21-2015, 03:59 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,205 posts, read 8,352,813 times
Reputation: 4622
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcmo View Post
Indy can pass whoever they want on paper with whatever stats you want to use, but it will never pass most of the other major cities in the midwest from a built urban environment, amenities and cultural standpoint in my opinion.

Indy will always be a tier below places like MSP, STL, Cleveland etc and even places like KC and Cincy are going to remain a step above Indy for the foreseeable future regardless of GDP and CSA population.

And I can't believe Chicago is even part of the conversation.
Step above Indy in terms of...?

Minneapolis and St. Louis are older denser cities. It's like saying Houston will always be a tier below Philadelphia. Well, Houston is now larger with a larger GDP, but of course it will never be more dense and urban, it's just not built that way. And Columbus has VERY much a similar environment to Indianapolis, which are the two cities this thread is about.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-21-2015, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
1,277 posts, read 4,063,109 times
Reputation: 688
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
Step above Indy in terms of...?

Minneapolis and St. Louis are older denser cities. It's like saying Houston will always be a tier below Philadelphia. Well, Houston is now larger with a larger GDP, but of course it will never be more dense and urban, it's just not built that way. And Columbus has VERY much a similar environment to Indianapolis, which are the two cities this thread is about.


You my friend are ill informed. Columbus' central city is drastically different than Indy. Columbus' central city was built with brick, Victorian architecture, row homes, apartment buildings, and dense commercial districts. Columbus' downtown is surrounded by commercial retail districts ( some gentrified others not) and urban neighborhoods with large apartment buildings and brick homes. Indy's downtown is not surrounded by dense retail areas like Columbus. Indy does not have a short north, German village, olde town east, or franklinton. This is a huge difference. Columbus' central city is overall a league above Indy in terms of its urban fabric. This is where the two cities are anything but similar. Columbus has the most dense urban neighborhoods in all of ohio. The university district and the short north now surpass the density of Cincinnati and Cleveland census tracts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-21-2015, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
4,270 posts, read 3,333,628 times
Reputation: 3001
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dyadic View Post
Your operative phrase is "in my opinion". Mention Indianapolis and you are sure to spit venom.
He's right. Indianapolis will never be as urban or offer the same amenities. It's below the other cities mentioned. Louisville is more urban than Indianapolis, and that's not saying much.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-21-2015, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,205 posts, read 8,352,813 times
Reputation: 4622
Quote:
Originally Posted by streetcreed View Post
You my friend are ill informed. Columbus' central city is drastically different than Indy. Columbus' central city was built with brick, Victorian architecture, row homes, apartment buildings, and dense commercial districts. Columbus' downtown is surrounded by commercial retail districts ( some gentrified others not) and urban neighborhoods with large apartment buildings and brick homes. Indy's downtown is not surrounded by dense retail areas like Columbus. Indy does not have a short north, German village, olde town east, or franklinton. This is a huge difference. Columbus' central city is overall a league above Indy in terms of its urban fabric. This is where the two cities are anything but similar. Columbus has the most dense urban neighborhoods in all of ohio. The university district and the short north now surpass the density of Cincinnati and Cleveland census tracts.
I'm curious, are you able to share some pictures of these dense and urban neighborhoods?

Indianapolis may not have much in downtown real estate and row houses, but the downtown district definitely looks more dense from a distance than Columbus does. I've only ever driven past Columbus, never been able to pay the city a proper visit.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top