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View Poll Results: What are Greater Indianapolis & Greater Columbus' ceilings in the Midwest over the course of the
They will surpass all places in the Midwest in population and economy except for Chicago, Detroit, and the Twin Cities 29 39.73%
They will settle somewhere in the mid-range and wont ever completely surpass Cleveland or Saint Louis 24 32.88%
They will stay where they are now as relative upstarts 11 15.07%
They will decline and lose ground in the future 4 5.48%
They will even surpass Chicago, Detroit, and the Twin Cities (CSAs) 1 1.37%
Other 4 5.48%
Voters: 73. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-21-2015, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati(Silverton)
1,577 posts, read 2,306,615 times
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^ LOL You can't get a real feeling of a city just by driving through it. Cities and metros are vast.
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Old 05-21-2015, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
21,081 posts, read 15,366,366 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unusualfire View Post
^ LOL You can't get a real feeling of a city just by driving through it. Cities and metros are vast.
They're vast but what you see on the interstate is real, but incomplete. It still forms part of a legitimate opinion.
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Old 05-22-2015, 12:55 AM
 
1,480 posts, read 1,292,655 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shakeesha View Post
He's right. Indianapolis will never be as urban or offer the same amenities. It's below the other cities mentioned. Louisville is more urban than Indianapolis, and that's not saying much.
Name the amenities these cities have over Indianapolis?
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Old 05-22-2015, 06:45 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Norwood)
3,386 posts, read 3,707,388 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shakeesha View Post
They will decline and lose future ground, and it's going to stay just like that. The only metro to join the big four will be Cincinnati when it merges with Dayton to overtake St. Louis.
Quote:
Originally Posted by unusualfire View Post
Cincinnati Dayton is already recognized internationally as a UA.

Major Agglomerations of the World - Population Statistics and Maps
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcmo View Post
Indy can pass whoever they want on paper with whatever stats you want to use, but it will never pass most of the other major cities in the midwest from a built urban environment, amenities and cultural standpoint in my opinion.

Indy will always be a tier below places like MSP, STL, Cleveland etc and even places like KC and Cincy are going to remain a step above Indy for the foreseeable future regardless of GDP and CSA population...
Yes. As cited above, in order to gel, this "twin-city in-house" thread conveniently sidesteps important dynamics of STL, KC, CLEVE and CINCY. Basically, the paper-thin projections presented here are little more than wish-fulfillment fantasies not meant to be tampered with by "outsiders" with boots on the ground.

Last edited by motorman; 05-22-2015 at 07:21 AM..
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Old 05-22-2015, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
1,277 posts, read 4,068,473 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
I'm curious, are you able to share some pictures of these dense and urban neighborhoods?

Indianapolis may not have much in downtown real estate and row houses, but the downtown district definitely looks more dense from a distance than Columbus does. I've only ever driven past Columbus, never been able to pay the city a proper visit.
If you go to census tract figures you will see that Columbus' urban neighborhoods are much more dense than Indy and some of the most dense in Ohio. Columbus developed completely different than Indy. Pre 1950 Columbus was built with brick, row homes, and commercial districts. North of downtown a large university was built and around that a city within a city.

At this point census estimates put Columbus' actual city density even higher than Cincinnati. Indy is much more spread out it annexed an entire county if Columbus annexed its main county the population would be over a million.

There are pictures it's called Google. Columbus' central city urban neighborhoods and Indy's are night and day. Google short north, Victorian village, German village, the university district, olde town east, Clintonville, Grandview. Regarding the two downtowns Indy has more retail but in terms of residence Columbus has a ton of quality development occurring and a few residential modern high rises. Indy is not really ahead in residential downtown growth either.

Last edited by streetcreed; 05-22-2015 at 06:25 PM..
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Old 05-22-2015, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,233 posts, read 8,387,248 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by streetcreed View Post
If you go to census tract figures you will see that Columbus' urban neighborhoods are much more dense than Indy and some of the most dense in Ohio. Columbus developed completely different than Indy. Pre 1950 Columbus was built with brick, row homes, and commercial districts. North of downtown a large university was built and around that a city within a city.

At this point census estimates put Columbus' actual city density even higher than Cincinnati. Indy is much more spread out it annexed an entire county if Columbus annexed its main county the population would be over a million.

There are pictures it's called Google. Columbus' central city urban neighborhoods and Indy's are night and day. Google short north, Victorian village, German village, the university district, olde town east, Clintonville, Grandview. Regarding the two downtowns Indy has more retail but in terms of residence Columbus has a ton of quality development occurring and a few residential modern high rises. Indy is not really ahead in residential downtown growth either.
I kinda expected you to be rude about it and not share anything, instead directing me to "Google" for all my needs. Merely expected a proud Columbus resident like yourself may have some personal pictures they'd like to show off, but after seeing the chip you have on your shoulder I see it's all personal bias fueling your argument. Thanks for contributing, what little you did!
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Old 05-22-2015, 10:58 PM
 
Location: Fishers, IN
6,495 posts, read 10,481,760 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by streetcreed View Post
You my friend are ill informed. Columbus' central city is drastically different than Indy. Columbus' central city was built with brick, Victorian architecture, row homes, apartment buildings, and dense commercial districts. Columbus' downtown is surrounded by commercial retail districts ( some gentrified others not) and urban neighborhoods with large apartment buildings and brick homes. Indy's downtown is not surrounded by dense retail areas like Columbus. Indy does not have a short north, German village, olde town east, or franklinton. This is a huge difference. Columbus' central city is overall a league above Indy in terms of its urban fabric. This is where the two cities are anything but similar. Columbus has the most dense urban neighborhoods in all of ohio. The university district and the short north now surpass the density of Cincinnati and Cleveland census tracts.
Mt. Adams feels more urban and dense to me than the Short North.
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Old 05-22-2015, 11:02 PM
 
Location: Earth
2,549 posts, read 3,119,134 times
Reputation: 1202
Quote:
Originally Posted by streetcreed View Post
If you go to census tract figures you will see that Columbus' urban neighborhoods are much more dense than Indy and some of the most dense in Ohio. Columbus developed completely different than Indy. Pre 1950 Columbus was built with brick, row homes, and commercial districts. North of downtown a large university was built and around that a city within a city.

At this point census estimates put Columbus' actual city density even higher than Cincinnati. Indy is much more spread out it annexed an entire county if Columbus annexed its main county the population would be over a million.

There are pictures it's called Google. Columbus' central city urban neighborhoods and Indy's are night and day. Google short north, Victorian village, German village, the university district, olde town east, Clintonville, Grandview. Regarding the two downtowns Indy has more retail but in terms of residence Columbus has a ton of quality development occurring and a few residential modern high rises. Indy is not really ahead in residential downtown growth either.
However, contrary to the outer areas what you failed to mention is that Indy's downtown core is more vibrant and dense at street level with far more activity. Downtown Columbus lacks big time. The city's core has no answer for Monument Circle. If the Commons is the best you can come up with then Indy has the War Memorial. Oh, wait you tore down City Center and Indy still has better retail downtown and can manage to keep Circle Centre active without Polaris and Easton (Fashoin Mall, Castleton-burbs) knocking at the door.
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Old 05-23-2015, 03:09 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati(Silverton)
1,577 posts, read 2,306,615 times
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Can we all just agree to disagree. No one is blowing anyone out of the water.
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Old 05-23-2015, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Somewhere extremely awesome
2,843 posts, read 2,309,985 times
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I'd say that Indianapolis and Columbus are comfortably in the same tier as Cincinnati, Cleveland, Kansas City, and St. Louis. They might currently be in the low end of that tier right now, and they might gain prominence in that tier, but there's too much of a gap between them and the Detroit and Minneapolis/St. Paul tier to expect them to become equals in the short-term.
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