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Old 05-19-2015, 09:30 AM
 
1,353 posts, read 1,137,967 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
I still genuinely know 0 people who moved to Georgia. Surprised I don't see these numbers play out in my anecdotal evidence. Lots move to NC, mostly old people to FL, but seriously - not one person I know chose Georgia. And I know a good number of people who moved to NC.

But it still is a small number when compared to FL and NJ. I mean double the New Yorkers move to NJ than GA and triple move to FL than GA.

I've lived in FL and GA. FL has more New Yorkers, but Atlanta is chalk full of them. I had an attorney in Atlanta who was from Brooklyn. Also, lots of New Yorkers at Emory (which is like 30% Jewish, not that Atlanta isn't Jewish for the South but lots of those students are from East Coast), and Georgia Tech.

I am surprised you don't know a single soul who has moved to Atlanta/GA. I actually have a hard time believing that. I think it's clear from the numbers that Americans who identify as Italian don't live in Atlanta in high numbers, so one could infer that with the amount of people who have moved from the Tri-State Area to Atlanta metro over the past 30+ years, clearly not so many of them are Italian.
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Old 05-19-2015, 09:34 AM
 
11,904 posts, read 9,637,243 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anonelitist View Post

I am surprised you don't know a single soul who has moved to Atlanta/GA. I actually have a hard time believing that. I think it's clear from the numbers that Americans who identify as Italian don't live in Atlanta in high numbers, so one could infer that with the amount of people who have moved from the Tri-State Area to Atlanta metro over the past 30+ years, clearly not so many of them are Italian.
Well that's the thing. Many whites in my area are Italian. About 25% of my town is of Italian descent. Lots of Irish too, good number of Jews.

And as I said in my last post, I actually do know one black family who moved to Atlanta but moved back within 5 years, which is probably why I forgot - because they're here again. They actually never even sold their house here. That's all. Funny enough, 3 families I know who moved to NC are all or part Italian descent. Two moved to the Raleigh area, one to a coastal area.
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Old 05-19-2015, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,626 posts, read 24,832,767 times
Reputation: 11185
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
I'd be interested in going to an Italian area in New Orleans, for example, and seeing how it compares to around here. Also to see how the food compares.
New Orleans has the oldest Italian-American community in the United States. There was an interesting program on public television not along about the Italian community down there.

http://www.pbs.org/the-italian-americans/home/

Side note: one interesting thing I learned from this series was the origins of the street parades where Italians carry their patron saints. In the series, one historian explains how the Catholic Church in NYC was dominated by the Irish, and they forbade the display of any Italian saints in churches. The Irish saw the Italians as superstitious with rituals that bordered on paganism. To protest the removal of Italian saints from the church, the Italians took their saints to the streets of East Harlem, and so began the tradition.

According to another historian featured in the series, Italians were segregated by place of origin. If you originated from Northern Italy, they marked that on your papers, and you were apparently treated better. If you originated from Southern Italy or Sicily, you were detained longer, and not treated as well as the Northern Italians.

It was also interesting to hear about the presence of White Protestant women in Italian-American homes. White Protestant social workers (nearly all women) largely thought that Italian childrearing practices were harmful to children and basically imposed their practices on Italian women.
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Old 05-19-2015, 09:39 AM
 
1,353 posts, read 1,137,967 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UAE50 View Post
Italian Ancestry, Metro Area
New York: 3,246,878
Boston: 1,105,474
Chicago: 688,706
Philadelphia: 983,916
Los Angeles: 589,501
Washington: 483,667
San Francisco: 443,958
Miami: 357,488
Detroit: 308,661
Hartford: 244,641
Dallas: 157,447
Atlanta: 144,902
Houston: 141,108
Boston 23.4%
Hartford 20.1%
Philadelphia 16.3%
New York 16.2%
San Francisco 9.7%
Washington 8.0%
Chicago 7.2%
Detroit 7.2%
Miami 6.0%
Los Angeles 4.4%
Atlanta 2.6%
Dallas 2.3%
Houston 2.2%
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Old 05-19-2015, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,626 posts, read 24,832,767 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anonelitist View Post
Boston 23.4%
Hartford 20.1%
Philadelphia 16.3%
New York 16.2%
San Francisco 9.7%
Washington 8.0%
Chicago 7.2%
Detroit 7.2%
Miami 6.0%
Los Angeles 4.4%
Atlanta 2.6%
Dallas 2.3%
Houston 2.2%
I'm not sure where you're getting these numbers from. The Philadelphia MSA is 13.9% Italian and the NYC MSA is 13.1%. These can't even represent CSA numbers since DC's MSA is 4.6% Italian and Baltimore's is 6.4%.

According to the most recent ACS data, these are the Top 10 metros for Italian ancestry reported.

New York - 2,632,782 (13.1%)
Philadelphia - 838,951 (13.9%)
Chicago - 665,874 (7.0%)
Boston - 654,948 (14.0%)
Los Angeles - 391,290 (3.0%)
Pittsburgh - 387,078 (16.4%)
Bay Area - 322,878 (5.0%)
Washington - 276,164 (4.6%)
Detroit - 268,684 (6.3%)
Cleveland - 211,584 (10.2%)

Last edited by BajanYankee; 05-19-2015 at 10:05 AM..
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Old 05-19-2015, 10:03 AM
 
Location: ITP - City of Atlanta Proper
7,797 posts, read 11,738,575 times
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I think it is pretty safe to assume that a huge chunk of Atlanta's ~150,000 Italians are from the NYC Metro area and other Northeastern cities as recent (last 3 decades or so) transplants without thinking very much about it since historically Atlanta didn't have a high Italian population like say New Orleans. Where else would they come from? Italy?

Edit:

I forgot to add that from a personal perspective, all the Italians in Atlanta that I know are from NYC, Upstate NY, NJ, and Brazil. In that order.
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Old 05-19-2015, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,626 posts, read 24,832,767 times
Reputation: 11185
Here's Italian ancestry by % of non-Hispanic White population.

New Haven - 34.4%
New York - 27.5%
Hartford - 23.7%
Scranton - 21.9%
Philadelphia - 21.8%
Buffalo - 21.5%
Rochester - 21.2%
Syracuse - 20.3%
Providence - 19.6%
Boston - 19.0%
Pittsburgh - 19.0%
Worcester - 16.5%
New Orleans - 16.5%
Miami - 15.5%
Cleveland - 14.6%
Erie - 14.4%
Chicago - 12.9%
Bay Area - 12.8%
Tampa - 11.7%
Baltimore - 10.9%
Washington - 9.8%
Los Angeles - 9.7%
San Diego - 9.5%
Phoenix - 8.2%
Richmond - 8.0%
Raleigh - 7.6%
Norfolk - 7.5%
Detroit - 9.3%
Jacksonville - 6.9%
St. Louis - 6.4%
Houston - 5.8%
Seattle - 5.5%
Charlotte - 5.5%
Atlanta - 4.8%

Last edited by BajanYankee; 05-19-2015 at 10:56 AM..
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Old 05-19-2015, 10:45 AM
 
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The great waves of European immigrants in the late 1800s-early 1900s largely avoided the South, and settled in the large cities of the Northeast and Midwest..
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Old 05-19-2015, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Dallas
282 posts, read 257,447 times
Reputation: 279
Quote:
Originally Posted by waronxmas View Post
Wow, this post is dripping with elitism...and by someone from Dallas no less.

You found one statistic to prove your claim, but it's a minor difference. Within context, that was during the middle of the recession so there were bound to be a bit a loss given that NYC wasn't as affected as Atlanta was. However, the biggest feeder counties from NYC to Atlanta are Queens and Kings counties (always has been) and they're destination is typically to Gwinnett, Dekalb or Clayton counties. But I'm sure you're aware of that.
When did I ever say that wasn't the case?

I pointed out several times that different demographics do and like different things, which is probably why that poster doesn't know anyone who has ever moved to Atlanta. Working-class black people from marginal areas move to Atlanta, yes. These numbers are reversed when you do places with huge black working-class populations like Brooklyn and Newark.

Why would you think the migration figures would be opposite? Why would there be larger flows from Manhattan into Atlanta?

Even when I move the slider to pre-recession, 2006, it's the same:

499 people moved from New York County, NY to Fulton County, GA
688 people moved from Fulton County, GA to New York County, NY

And I'm sure most of those people are from Harlem, Washington Heights, etc. Our corporate office is in Manhattan, go there all the time, know tons of people who live there, and I truly have never heard anyone in the city mention Atlanta, let alone move there. But these are all white-collar professionals. I know people from Atlanta who live there though.

Last edited by UAE50; 05-19-2015 at 11:54 AM..
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Old 05-19-2015, 11:13 AM
 
4,801 posts, read 3,451,682 times
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So I notice the pattern of Italian Southerners concentrating in heavily Catholic areas like Baltimore and New Orleans. Makes sense considering the strong Catholic roots of many Italians. Otherwise I notice it in huge metros like DC where pretty much everyone lives, and Florida where Northeastern Italians relocate. I wonder if in Tampa much of the Italian presence came from early settlements directly from Italy like it did in New Orleans and Baltimore?

I do remember though the first time I met an Italian who sounded Southern and I was like "whoaaaa this is real???" I thought it was all "bada bing" type New York sound (because apparently that's just the way Italians are supposed to talk according to 25 year old me).
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