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Old 05-22-2015, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
31,598 posts, read 53,291,591 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SweethomeSanAntonio View Post
San Antonio is fast approaching the 2.5 million mark, "dwarfs" is a bit of an exaggeration. Dekalb and Fulton Counties cover between 800-900 square miles and include the bulk of urban Atlanta, 1.7 million residents, the rest of the metro is not as urban, a whole lot of low density exburbs over a very large territory. San Antonio has 1.5 million people within less than 400 square miles, granted San Antonio doesn't have nowhere near as many exburbs like Atlanta, there isn't much outlying exburbs in the western and southern portions of metro S.A, the heavy population base is north and northwest of San Antonio and along the I-35 corridor towards Austin, one of the fastest growing regions in the country.
Your reasoning for claiming that its an exaggeration to say that Atlanta dwarfs San Antonio is totally flawed.

Atlanta has over 6 million people in it's combined statistical area. That totally dwarfs San Antonio.
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Old 05-22-2015, 09:05 AM
 
8,702 posts, read 6,383,312 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SweethomeSanAntonio View Post
San Antonio is fast approaching the 2.5 million mark, "dwarfs" is a bit of an exaggeration. Dekalb and Fulton Counties cover between 800-900 square miles and include the bulk of urban Atlanta, 1.7 million residents, the rest of the metro is not as urban, a whole lot of low density exburbs over a very large territory. San Antonio has 1.5 million people within less than 400 square miles, granted San Antonio doesn't have nowhere near as many exburbs like Atlanta, there isn't much outlying exburbs in the western and southern portions of metro S.A, the heavy population base is north and northwest of San Antonio and along the I-35 corridor towards Austin, one of the fastest growing regions in the country.
If you are a guy, is it important to know your bra size? Exactly! Would it make sense for two guys to argue who has the bigger bra size? Exactly! That is a metric for women....not men. Similarly, these MSA, CSA and all these other metrics ARE NOT DESIGNED FOR use by 99% percent of people. They are for politics and maybe marketing purposes.

When have any of you been riding in your car and crashed into the invisible forcefield of a city boundary, county boundary, MSA boundary or CSA boundary? We do not live our every day lives bounded or restricted by these metrics....so why do we keep talking about them when we cannot even use them? I think what most people use is reasonable access, based upon a radius. You might consider your "area" to be defined as what you can have access to in a 30 minute drive, 40 minute drive, 50 minute drive, etc. I have never heard anyone say that they don't want to take a job because it is outside my official MSA, my official city or my official county. I have heard people say that it is too far a drive though...and that they wanted something closer. So people basically use distance....and not some man made constructs like city lines, county lines, MSA definitions and such.

For me, I just like to know how many people exist in a certain mile radius and that tells me how big a place is and what is likely available to me. All other metrics, to me, are like men arguing over their bra size. Now, granted, these statistics are good in providing information about population trends in an area.....but not in saying what area is really bigger or better than another area. I have been to San Antonio a couple of times, and lived in Atlanta for brief time. There are a lot of more people available to me in a 50 minute radius of Atlanta that a similar radius in San Antonio.....way more.

Last edited by Indentured Servant; 05-22-2015 at 09:39 AM..
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Old 05-22-2015, 09:07 AM
 
2,036 posts, read 1,449,871 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atadytic19 View Post
Looks like Seattle is in the top 20 now. It should have passed Memphis, is neck and neck with El Paso, and looks like both Seattle and El Paso will be passing Detroit soon.

I won't be surprised if the estimates for 2015 put Seattle at 18, El Paso at 19, Memphis at 20 and Detroit at 21.
After decades in the Top 20, Memphis has quickly fallen out of the Top 20 to #23 now. How sad...
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Old 05-22-2015, 10:10 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,558 posts, read 17,975,225 times
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Originally Posted by iknowftbll View Post
I think Omaha has annexed a few neighboring communities in the recent past. You should check to see the city's square mileage and it that has gone up, there's your answer. Other than that, the census people are constantly doing adjustments to their estimates and baselines, sometimes at a given city's request.
While annexation is certainly understandable and typical, how does it retroactively affect a baseline population? Wouldn't the population just be added in the year of the annexation? Lots of cities annex land but I haven't found other examples with this sort of disparity. Maybe there's someone from Omaha that can chime in here on the issue?
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Old 05-22-2015, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
31,598 posts, read 53,291,591 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
While annexation is certainly understandable and typical, how does it retroactively affect a baseline population? Wouldn't the population just be added in the year of the annexation? Lots of cities annex land but I haven't found other examples with this sort of disparity. Maybe there's someone from Omaha that can chime in here on the issue?
They always redo the baseline in order to match the current geographic boundaries. Ive seen it several times.
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Old 05-22-2015, 10:26 AM
 
550 posts, read 370,300 times
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I think what he is saying that if a city annexed after the census, they update the census figure to include the population the city would have been if the annexed area had already been a part of the city at the time of the count. I guess it is done because a census is an official count and maybe some agencies only use counts rather than yearly estimates so it would be important to add the new areas to reflect the present boundaries, based on official counts. So if city a had 100 people in 2010 and city b had 10 people, and city b got absorbed into city a then they take city a's population to be 110 because that is what it is now.
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Old 05-22-2015, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
423 posts, read 588,733 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atadytic19 View Post
Looks like Seattle is in the top 20 now. It should have passed Memphis, is neck and neck with El Paso, and looks like both Seattle and El Paso will be passing Detroit soon.

I won't be surprised if the estimates for 2015 put Seattle at 18, El Paso at 19, Memphis at 20 and Detroit at 21.
Almost certainly Denver would be somewhere in that list. Given its growth rate history its actually 50/50 that it doesn't surpass Seattle.
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Old 05-22-2015, 10:43 AM
 
2,548 posts, read 5,143,567 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
Your reasoning for claiming that its an exaggeration to say that Atlanta dwarfs San Antonio is totally flawed.

Atlanta has over 6 million people in it's combined statistical area. That totally dwarfs San Antonio.


Comparing CSA's to MSA's are not fair comparisons. Atlanta metro is much bigger but it doesn't dwarf San Antonio's.
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Old 05-22-2015, 10:51 AM
 
9,701 posts, read 6,727,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SweethomeSanAntonio View Post
Comparing CSA's to MSA's are not fair comparisons. Atlanta metro is much bigger but it doesn't dwarf San Antonio's.
Atlanta has 2.5 times San Antonio's population. It most certainly dwarfs SA.

SA isn't a particularly large or important city. It's only the fourth most important city in Texas. Atlanta is probably the most important city in the SE U.S.
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Old 05-22-2015, 10:58 AM
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Interesting! Thanks for sharing.
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