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Old 05-22-2015, 01:02 PM
 
Location: ITP - City of Atlanta Proper
7,796 posts, read 11,729,302 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SweethomeSanAntonio View Post
The term"Dwarf" is a harsh word to use when comparing cities.
Why would you think that? There are huge differences between a metro area depending on population. The dynamics and challenges of two metros with huge population differences is what brings out the term dwarf. What it takes to run metro San Antonio is dwarfed by what it takes to run a 6 million metro like Atlanta or Houston or Dallas or Miami or Philly, just like what it takes to run the NYC or LA metros dwarfs what it takes to run the 6 million level.

This concept cannot be that abstract for you, can it?
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Old 05-22-2015, 01:30 PM
 
Location: California → Tennessee → Ohio
1,399 posts, read 2,156,451 times
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San Jose, Calif., is now among the 10 U.S. cities with a population of 1 million or more.

Ten U.S. Cities Now Have 1 Million or More People
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Old 05-22-2015, 03:21 PM
 
1,353 posts, read 1,136,312 times
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anyone who has ever been to or through SA and Atlanta would think Atlanta is 3-4x the size, at least. Once you get to 5+ million people in a metro, there's a whole other feel that you get from a metro of that size. Exponentially more office space and retail, wider and more congested highways, world's busiest airport in this case, heavy rail transit, one of the largest skylines in the US complete with an abundance of high rise condos/apartments, major world class universities, etc etc etc

San Antonio is not a small city by any means, but I would say Atlanta as both a city and a metro crushes SA city and metro, irrespective of what population stats are on paper and however one wants to skew those stats to make a point.


Similarly, Jacksonville and San Francisco have almost the exact same population and they couldn't be more different and more "apart" on feel and scope of the city. Stats on paper hardly tell the full story.
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Old 05-22-2015, 03:45 PM
 
2,548 posts, read 5,129,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anonelitist View Post
anyone who has ever been to or through SA and Atlanta would think Atlanta is 3-4x the size, at least. Once you get to 5+ million people in a metro, there's a whole other feel that you get from a metro of that size. Exponentially more office space and retail, wider and more congested highways, world's busiest airport in this case, heavy rail transit, one of the largest skylines in the US complete with an abundance of high rise condos/apartments, major world class universities, etc etc etc

San Antonio is not a small city by any means, but I would say Atlanta as both a city and a metro crushes SA city and metro, irrespective of what population stats are on paper and however one wants to skew those stats to make a point.


Similarly, Jacksonville and San Francisco have almost the exact same population and they couldn't be more different and more "apart" on feel and scope of the city. Stats on paper hardly tell the full story.

Don't get carried away, now, it's a little more than twice the size. It has a bigger skyline & more congested. The freeway system is comparable, San Antonio does have an extensive network of freeways. I have driven through Atlanta more than once and it didn't seem super busy until I reached the central area, the twisting freeways and tunnels are cool.
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Old 05-22-2015, 04:12 PM
 
517 posts, read 357,353 times
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I don't think you can just look at the population and say one does or does not dwarf the other. New Orleans is a metro of about 1M. DFW is the largest in the south and I didn't think even DFW dwarfed NOLA. DFW does seem a lot bigger but didn't feel like it dwarfed NOLA.

ATL has a more impressive skyline, but I felt in the heart of the city SA didn't even feel smaller, let alone dwarfed.

In terms of amenities SA is dwarfed by ATL because ATL is the biggest thing in its state and the surrounding states. In Texas, SA has Austin nearby to compete with for amenities plus the Behemoths of Houston and DFW.

But all of that is circumstance and not simply population. Seattle for example, or Denver, are much smaller than ATL but they would go toe to toe with ATL in most categories because they anchor an area by themselves and are thus boosted by circumstance rather than mere population.
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Old 05-22-2015, 06:11 PM
 
1,632 posts, read 1,479,050 times
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Poor dwarfs caught in the middle(or bottom) of this highly intelligent discussion on 'dwarfs this' or 'dwarfs that'. I call for an immediate locking of this thread for Sizeism of the highest(or lowest) degree.
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Old 05-22-2015, 07:48 PM
 
6,385 posts, read 10,368,030 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
While annexation is certainly understandable and typical, how does it retroactively affect a baseline population? Wouldn't the population just be added in the year of the annexation? Lots of cities annex land but I haven't found other examples with this sort of disparity. Maybe there's someone from Omaha that can chime in here on the issue?
It should retroactively affect the baseline population because annexation isn't the same as growth, at least in terms of percentage.

One example I know of involves Nashville. While it is true that Nashville and Davidson County are a single government, there are several "satellite cities" that retain their own separate governments (therefore, they are not counted as part of Nashville's population -- referred to in Census terms as the 'balance').

One of those satellite cities voted to surrender their charter, and therefore was absorbed into the city of Nashville. It was basically a de facto annexation. It was relatively minor (~2,300 residents), but they were already residents of the county. If you counted that as "growth" for Nashville, then it would have an artificially high growth percentage.


A number of cities (Memphis has been a famous example) have masked population loss over the decades by aggressive annexation. Without the "adjustment", it would appear that some of these cities have healthy growth rates, when in fact, they are struggling.
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Old 05-22-2015, 08:27 PM
 
Location: California → Tennessee → Ohio
1,399 posts, read 2,156,451 times
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Fastest Growing Cities Are In The West And South

Latest U.S. Census Data: Fastest Growing Cities Are In The West And South : NPR
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Old 05-22-2015, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
12,766 posts, read 12,748,545 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atadytic19 View Post
Philly and Phoenix are neck and neck being 150 and 1537k respectively.

Both Charlotte and Fort Worth passed 800k, with FW, slipping ahead of Charlotte 812 to 809k.

SF at 857k increased its lead on Columbus at 835k
SF's lead on Columbus shrank, actually.
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Old 05-22-2015, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Florida
4,809 posts, read 2,213,636 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
No, that would be Miami. Its MSA and CSA are larger.
Miami is the largest CSA in the Southeast and that excludes Texas cities which always seems to have a pissin' match with the Atlanta.

Miami CSA : 5,929,819
Atlanta CSA : 5,614,323

Source : 2014 : List of Metropolitan Statistical Areas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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