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Old 06-05-2015, 08:09 AM
 
275 posts, read 298,157 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MynameisSam View Post
For city-life: Chicago > Philadelphia
For metro area-life: Philadelphia > Chicago
I don't know, I think I'd reverse those two. Chicago may be larger but it's not nearly as compact and you have to travel a lot more (by rail) to fully experience it. You really just need your legs and maybe a bike to enjoy almost all of what Philadelphia has to offer. Philly is just a lot denser, giving you an urban experience that is more like New York.
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Old 06-05-2015, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Bones View Post
I don't know, I think I'd reverse those two. Chicago may be larger but it's not nearly as compact and you have to travel a lot more (by rail) to fully experience it. You really just need your legs and maybe a bike to enjoy almost all of what Philadelphia has to offer. Philly is just a lot denser, giving you an urban experience that is more like New York.
That would completely depend on where you are in the city. Putting a blanket statement like this shows you aren't that familiar with the city even if you are. The pure fact is that there is a chunk of Chicago that is just as big as Philadelphia that is just as compact (population density wise). Yes, there are much less dense areas, but there's huge areas of town with high (for US standards) density that are very walkable. In fact, Chicago has a higher percentage of residents living in neighborhods with a walk score of 90+. When you go to 70+, Philadelphia is ahead, but not by much (something like 2% ahead)

Last edited by marothisu; 06-05-2015 at 08:53 AM..
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Old 06-05-2015, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
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Going off of ^, here's the data:

Percentage of residents living in neighborhoods with 90+ Walkscore
* Chicago: 16.8% (451,349 people)
* Philadelphia: 13.8% (210,352 people)

80+:
* Philadelphia: 56.6% (860,838 people)
* Chicago: 38.4% (1,031,474 people)

70+:
* Philadelphia: 76.8% (1,168,854 people)
* Chicago: 75.2% (2,019,249 people)

Translating these numbers, the interesting part is that if you were to put all the neighborhoods in Chicago that were 80+ (over 1 million people), it's about 68% of Philadelphia's overall population (their own = 56.6%).
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Old 06-05-2015, 09:13 AM
 
275 posts, read 298,157 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
That would completely depend on where you are in the city. Putting a blanket statement like this shows you aren't that familiar with the city even if you are. The pure fact is that there is a chunk of Chicago that is just as big as Philadelphia that is just as compact (population density wise). Yes, there are much less dense areas, but there's huge areas of town with high (for US standards) density that are very walkable. In fact, Chicago has a higher percentage of residents living in neighborhods with a walk score of 90+. When you go to 70+, Philadelphia is ahead, but not by much (something like 2% ahead)
Sure Chicago has areas that are as dense as Philadelphia, but its development is much more nodal. Philadelphia's dense areas are more seamlessly integrated.

This photo says it all:



Some of the densest areas in Chicago are several miles away from the city center.
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Old 06-05-2015, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Bones View Post
Some of the densest areas in Chicago are several miles away from the city center.
I don't think you are really that familiar with the city and that's not bad, but as someone who actually knows the city...you're completely wrong. Your map even shows a chunk of dark color right in the core. Do you even know where downtown is? If you did, you wouldn't be saying this. There are areas colored just as dark in the core as 5 miles north.

From the core on north along the lakefront, the density is fairly consistent throughout. The densest community area in town is Edgewater, but that is not much denser than the Near North Side, which is downtown. Weighted density of NNS is actually higher. Of the 15 densest census tracts in the city, 7 of them are in the core.

Community areas, starting from the core and going north along the lake:
* Loop (Downtown - CBD): 19,000 per sq mile
* Near North Side (Downtown - i.e. home to Michigan Avenue): 30,000 per sq mile
* Lincoln Park: 20,000 per sq mile
* Lakeview: 30,000 per sq mile
* Uptown: 24,000 per sq mile
* Edgewater: 33,000 per sq mile
* Rogers Park: 30,000 per sq mile

The two most north areas along the lakefront, Edgewater and Rogers Park, are no denser on average than Near North Side which is downtown. Anybody who is actually familiar with Chicago knows that the level of density is maintained for 9+ miles along the lakefront fairly consistently starting downtown. And with the current mini boom of residential construction happening downtown and has been for the last 2 years, the core right now is denser than it was in 2010 when the Census was taken and will continue to increase.
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Old 06-05-2015, 09:58 AM
 
Location: The City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
I don't think you are really that familiar with the city and that's not bad, but as someone who actually knows the city...you're completely wrong. Your map even shows a chunk of dark color right in the core. Do you even know where downtown is? If you did, you wouldn't be saying this. There are areas colored just as dark in the core as 5 miles north.

From the core on north along the lakefront, the density is fairly consistent throughout. The densest community area in town is Edgewater, but that is not much denser than the Near North Side, which is downtown. Weighted density of NNS is actually higher. Of the 15 densest census tracts in the city, 7 of them are in the core.

Community areas, starting from the core and going north along the lake:
* Loop (Downtown - CBD): 19,000 per sq mile
* Near North Side (Downtown - i.e. home to Michigan Avenue): 30,000 per sq mile
* Lincoln Park: 20,000 per sq mile
* Lakeview: 30,000 per sq mile
* Uptown: 24,000 per sq mile
* Edgewater: 33,000 per sq mile
* Rogers Park: 30,000 per sq mile

The two most north areas along the lakefront, Edgewater and Rogers Park, are no denser on average than Near North Side which is downtown. Anybody who is actually familiar with Chicago knows that the level of density is maintained for 9+ miles along the lakefront fairly consistently starting downtown. And with the current mini boom of residential construction happening downtown and has been for the last 2 years, the core right now is denser than it was in 2010 when the Census was taken and will continue to increase.
was just in Chicago last weekedn and River North continues to infill I stayed there for 5 days. Its amazing how much development and how much more active the area is relative to even ten years ago

Liked the Paris Bistro place
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Old 06-05-2015, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
was just in Chicago last weekedn and River North continues to infill I stayed there for 5 days. Its amazing how much development and how much more active the area is relative to even ten years ago

Liked the Paris Bistro place
Yeah - and also just north of Chicago Avenue in the Gold Coast (though billed as River North in a few areas) where I live is seeing a lot of action. The downtown area is still having a lot of activity with residential (and also new hotels) and will continue for awhile I think. Been a lot of NYC investors to buy buildings in River North, South Loop, and West Loop in the last 18 months.

Paris Bistro as in Paris Club? Place has been around for awhile, though it was reconcepted not too long ago. The ramen place next door used to actually be a bar part of the same bistro (separate from the 2nd floor dance club/lounge) until last summer.
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Old 06-05-2015, 10:19 AM
 
Location: The City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
Yeah - and also just north of Chicago Avenue in the Gold Coast (though billed as River North in a few areas) where I live is seeing a lot of action. The downtown area is still having a lot of activity with residential (and also new hotels) and will continue for awhile I think. Been a lot of NYC investors to buy buildings in River North, South Loop, and West Loop in the last 18 months.

Paris Bistro as in Paris Club? Place has been around for awhile, though it was reconcepted not too long ago. The ramen place next door used to actually be a bar part of the same bistro (separate from the 2nd floor dance club/lounge) until last summer.
Yep that is the one had dinner there among other places

Had good Italian at Coco paso too, reminded me a little of Amis in Philly

anyway lots more activity there and crowded on weekends seems like it is the new busiest bar area from what I could tell albeit a younger crowd than myself

Really enjoy Chicago rain and all this past weekend
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Old 06-05-2015, 10:33 AM
 
Location: The City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
That would completely depend on where you are in the city. Putting a blanket statement like this shows you aren't that familiar with the city even if you are. The pure fact is that there is a chunk of Chicago that is just as big as Philadelphia that is just as compact (population density wise). Yes, there are much less dense areas, but there's huge areas of town with high (for US standards) density that are very walkable. In fact, Chicago has a higher percentage of residents living in neighborhods with a walk score of 90+. When you go to 70+, Philadelphia is ahead, but not by much (something like 2% ahead)
both are very urban and mostly walkable

Chicago is more on a grand scale in roads buildings etc Philly is more compact

I do think Philly on the whole is slightly more walk-able but Chicago and the DT is most definitely larger (sizable amount).

Both are very urban and Chicago gives off a larger more grand feel, Philly is more compact and intimate if that makes sense

An argument can be made that either is better. I like both very much just but scale and size have to give the larger feel to Chicago even with drop offs or less senselessness

Two of my favorite cities so am generally very happy spending time in either
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Old 06-05-2015, 10:58 AM
 
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I also think Philly is slightly more urban/walkable than Chicago, though central Chicago and it's northside are very walkable and dense. It's just that when you start going south and west, it kind of falls off, plus I don't consider bungalows very urban, at least not like rowhouses.
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