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View Poll Results: Outside of NYC/Mexico City, which metro area experiences the biggest transit crush?
Greater LA 3 9.38%
SF Bay Area 1 3.13%
Chicagoland 7 21.88%
Greater Toronto 11 34.38%
Greater Montreal 2 6.25%
Metro DC 7 21.88%
Metro Boston 1 3.13%
Metro Philly 0 0%
Metro Vancouver 0 0%
Voters: 32. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-24-2015, 05:11 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 10,579,396 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
Have they played around with sending trains at shorter intervals (if they can)?
Not sure...

According to the TTC off peak frequency on the yonge/uni line is 4-5 mins and peak frequency (rush hour) is 2-3 mins.. I'd guess that is pretty good.

Toronto rapid transit - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

There's talk about an automatic train control system that will be installed by 2020 which could increase service frequency to 105 seconds.
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Old 05-24-2015, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 10,579,396 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post

Toronto sounds like it "wins."
Yeah that is the thing - no doubt the system is busy but it is also a reflection of political failure over the years to keep pace with growth in terms of transit infrastructure.. The city is starting to move in the right direction - particular with expanded service outside DT core but I don't think there are plans for Downtown relief anytime soon which means that part of the system will continue to be a transit 'crush' and will probably get worse given the insane growth of T.O's DT core so it is a 'win' and a 'lose' at the same time.
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Old 05-24-2015, 05:32 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 12,658,137 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
Yeah that is the thing - no doubt the system is busy but it is also a reflection of political failure over the years to keep pace with growth in terms of transit infrastructure.. The city is starting to move in the right direction - particular with expanded service outside DT core but I don't think there are plans for Downtown relief anytime soon which means that part of the system will continue to be a transit 'crush' and will probably get worse given the insane growth of T.O's DT core so it is a 'win' and a 'lose' at the same time.
The good news is the demand is there.
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Old 05-24-2015, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Rockville, MD
849 posts, read 1,419,850 times
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I'm almost positive that Yonge/Bloor is busier than any rapid transit station in US/Canada- Mexico City *might* have a busier subway station, but i dunno...NY Penn station *MAY* be busier than Bloor/Yonge if you combine LIRR/Amtrak/NJ Transit with the subway ridership, but NOT on subway alone.
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Old 05-24-2015, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Rockville, MD
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I'm surprised that there haven't been any votes for Vancouver...the 99 B-Line is the bus route in North America and SkyTrain system handles ~400k passengers on fairly low capacity rolling stock...so while its overall ridership may not be all that high, the "crush" most definitely is.


Anyone here ridden both the el in Chicago and the T in Boston? How would you compare them in terms of perceived crowds? I'd imagine they're somewhat comparable (i.e. less of a crush than Toronto/Montreal/DC, but more than SF/Philly- though BART can get really crowded during rush hours, but that's more a result of its low frequency and single trunk through San Francisco than anything else.
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Old 05-24-2015, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,326 posts, read 18,079,072 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
Not sure...

According to the TTC off peak frequency on the yonge/uni line is 4-5 mins and peak frequency (rush hour) is 2-3 mins.. I'd guess that is pretty good.

Toronto rapid transit - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

There's talk about an automatic train control system that will be installed by 2020 which could increase service frequency to 105 seconds.
Yeah that's pretty good. Chicago used to experience stuff like what you showed in the videos, especially during rush hour and especially even more when the Cubs were playing. A few years ago they started sending them in every 2-3 minutes and things got better. Still crowded, but not as much completely packed stuff. Really made a positive difference though.
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Old 05-24-2015, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bballniket View Post
I'm almost positive that Yonge/Bloor is busier than any rapid transit station in US/Canada- Mexico City *might* have a busier subway station, but i dunno...NY Penn station *MAY* be busier than Bloor/Yonge if you combine LIRR/Amtrak/NJ Transit with the subway ridership, but NOT on subway alone.
During the week at least, the subways aren't too bad in many lines. I've had my packed moments on lines like the 2 or 3, but definitely not everyday. I haven't experienced too many times a subway platform really packed during the week when everyone is commuting. Weekends I've had it more often to be honest, especially riding to/from an area like SoHo.

Penn Station is pretty busy though with everything. Sometimes right outside of it on the street around 34th and 7th can be pretty crazy with all the foot traffic.
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Old 05-24-2015, 09:16 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
14,326 posts, read 18,079,072 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bballniket View Post
Anyone here ridden both the el in Chicago and the T in Boston? How would you compare them in terms of perceived crowds? I'd imagine they're somewhat comparable (i.e. less of a crush than Toronto/Montreal/DC, but more than SF/Philly- though BART can get really crowded during rush hours, but that's more a result of its low frequency and single trunk through San Francisco than anything else.
I'm from Chicago - On the north side, the lines can get pretty crowded between the Red, Blue, and Brown lines. I've had plenty of times in the mornings on the Red Line going to work between 8am and 9am where I had to wait for a few more trains because they were completely packed. Coming back home at rush hour from downtown can be a similar experience. On weekends, it's a crapshoot. You could easily ride from downtown north on the Red Line at like 10am on a Saturday and have it be pretty empty, and then come back a few hours later on the same line and have it be really full where you can barely move. During the winter months it's not as bad, but when summer hits and it's tourist season, it's a lot worse.

The worst part about living on the north side and working downtown is when the Cubs play. The Red Line drops off right next to the stadium, and the Brown Line not far away. Not only does it get so crowded you can barely move, but it's full of fans who don't ride the train much, if at all ever. Can't tell you how many times I've had to get off at my stop and there's a bunch of San Diego Padre fans just kind of standing there, spinning around in a circle. They don't realize that they should get off the train to let everyone else off.


I've been working in NYC for most of the last 10 months and I actually don't find it that bad. I think everyone assumes that every line is going to be plugged up during morning/evening rush hour, but honestly it's not that bad. Not anything as bad as I've experienced in any other world city to be honest. I think the fact that the system is so big with so many lines probably helps this.
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Old 05-24-2015, 10:34 PM
 
Location: Rockville, MD
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Quote:
During the week at least, the subways aren't too bad in many lines. I've had my packed moments on lines like the 2 or 3, but definitely not everyday. I haven't experienced too many times a subway platform really packed during the week when everyone is commuting. Weekends I've had it more often to be honest, especially riding to/from an area like SoHo.

Penn Station is pretty busy though with everything. Sometimes right outside of it on the street around 34th and 7th can be pretty crazy with all the foot traffic.
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NYC is more manageable than you'd think because of the tremendous amount of infrastructure they have in place. As densely populated and massive as the city is, I feel like it's one of the few large cities in the country actually has the infrastructure to support that enormous population...NYC is certainly an incredibly operation of scale.

I think part of it has to do with the fact that the entertainment/business hubs are covered by SO many lines, so that when they do get slammed, no single line feels ALL the pressure.

In Chicago, the Howard Branch of the Red line and the Brown line are definitely strained during rush hour.
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Old 05-24-2015, 10:36 PM
 
Location: Rockville, MD
849 posts, read 1,419,850 times
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Bloor/Yonge in Toronto is pretty interesting in that it receives OFF-PEAK frequencies of 4-5 minutes (by far the best in US/Canada) and the ridership is so high that it's still insanely crowded..Toronto is interesting though in that suburban bus ridership is even VERY high...buses very frequent (10 mins or less) pretty much all hours of the day along virtually every major road in the city.

I feel like the reason Toronto's (relatively small) subway system has such high ridership is because of how well the bus network feeds into the rail system. I wouldn't be surprised if >70% of subway trips in Toronto began with a bus trip.

So Toronto definitely has inadequate rail infrastructure for a metro its size, but its buses really help leverage the usability of the rail system that currently exists.
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