U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 10-27-2017, 09:58 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,458 posts, read 2,998,808 times
Reputation: 1939

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I don't think I was clear. I was saying that for both DC and Atlanta, their sizes match their feels and DC is larger than Atlanta, both in city population and MSA (although not by a whole lot). DC would feel larger to me if it had a traditional skyline.
DC in relation does feel a good bit larger than Atlanta because of it's urbanity and to me their MSA populations aren't really that close, not to even mention CSA. Atlanta stretches much much further with almost half the amount of density just to reach 5 or 6 million people. I have lived in both and although I don't proclaim DC as a mega city nor Atlanta as a small podunk town, there is a difference in intensity and energy of how both places feel to me.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-27-2017, 12:40 PM
 
1,870 posts, read 1,236,448 times
Reputation: 1856


Beautiful; that is a great way to show how useless that rankings by city proper have become. It should be shown to anyone who can't seem to grasp the concept of arbitrary boundaries.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-27-2017, 09:15 PM
 
761 posts, read 409,216 times
Reputation: 516
Well Atlanta is EASILY explained because the city ITSELF is ABOUT 600k. Atlanta, like D.C. is a smallish core city with large suburbs.


Austin, big do you think it is? Its over 900K residents but unlike Atlanta or D.C. has small suburbs. Its still bigger than Charlotte, Raleigh, Memphis and Nashville. If anything, I/m/o, Austin plays bigger than 900K. No metro area in the nation has changed more in the last ten years. This Place Sure Has Changed: Which Cities Have Changed the Most? - MagnifyMoney


Austin has some nationally recognized events in SXSW, Austin City Limits Music Festival and the U.S. Formula One Grand Prix. In my opinion San Antonio is a city that at 1.4 million seems slower that its size would suggest.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-27-2017, 09:18 PM
 
761 posts, read 409,216 times
Reputation: 516
Quote:
Originally Posted by motorman View Post
Cincinnati. City population of 298,000--metro population of almost 2.2 million (Ohio's largest MSA). Very soon the Cincinnati/Dayton corridor ("CIN-DAY") will become a combined metro of nearly 3.2 million people.
That will never happen. Dayton is over 55 miles from Cincy. Baltimore Washington are separate because they are 40 miles apart. Dallas FW are only 30 miles away so they do qualify.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-27-2017, 09:28 PM
 
761 posts, read 409,216 times
Reputation: 516
Quote:
Originally Posted by murksiderock View Post
DC is a 6.1 million person metropolis but I can make the argument it feels larger. The District proper has a daytime population over 1.15 million, and with the easy integration of multiple public transportation systems, complex interstate system, two major airports, heavy pedestrian traffic, it feels more like a city headed towards 10 million...

I wouldn't say Pittsburgh feels "significantly" larger than Nashville, but it does look and feel larger. Nashville feels smaller than most cities it's size, so I'd say Nashville is an example of a city that feels smaller than it actially is, but it is filling in and densifying rapidly...


Make the argument it feels larger? How? Nothing you said is not anything any other big metro has.
And Pittsburgh IS larger than Nashville by at least 500K if you look at MSA. Plus, Pitt being an older city in a very hilly area will fell busier because its residents can live in certain areas due to the terrain.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-27-2017, 09:34 PM
 
761 posts, read 409,216 times
Reputation: 516
Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
Exactly why people in DC, Boston, SF etc could give a rats tail about city municipal boundaries.

DC for example has it's original 100 sq mi diamond district that includes the 15 sq mi Alexandria, and 26 sq mi Arlington. The population within this 100 sq miles is over 1.1 million which already would be the 10th largest city in the country, and that is still about 1/3 the physical size of the average "major city".

Now of course SF and Boston would jump too in the same scenario of adding their local next door municipalities too.
Alexandria was never part of the D.C. as was Arlington.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-27-2017, 09:39 PM
 
761 posts, read 409,216 times
Reputation: 516
Quote:
Originally Posted by murksiderock View Post
-Atlanta doesn't feel larger than its size; it feels in the right spot. DC does feel larger...

-Cleveland absolutely does NOT feel larger than it actually is, I have no clue where people get this from, other than wishing it were true from its laurels. Cleveland feels what it is, a ~2 million person metro, and an easy argument can be made that it feels smaller than a lot if it's peers. Pittsburgh feels to be on the large end but I don't know id say it feels larger than maybe 2.7 million. Baltimore feels larger...

Regarding Pittsburgh's "village feel", I will specifically contend that is an honest interpretation. The Southside feels like a collection of, if not "villages", it is very reminiscent of small town Appalachia with a more urban form. We dined a few times at the Eat N'Park on Liberty in South Hills; that entire South Hills/Dormont area is very village-like. Even going further into the city, the Allentown/South Side Slopes/East Carson areas have the same feel, as does Oakland and surroundings (toured the UPitt area and ate at a Popeyes on Fifth to satisfy my fried chicken cravings); Oakland is like a college town plopped into the middle of a city...

None if this should be misconstrued as suggesting Pittsburgh isn't urban, but a if a place can be both urban and unnassumingly quaint, Pittsburgh is that place, and I think that is a strong, strong benefit. I think that every neighborhood seems to have it's own main street, it's own local everything, lends to the overwhelming sense of community. Pittsburgh has traditional seeming urban form, and then it has suburban-like feel in neighborhoods like the West End or Crafton Heights. Pittsburgh is unique in this regard and I find it very attractive that it's a large city with a semblance of small-town vibe...

--People are underselling Charlotte. It's coming to it's own as a city that feels larger than it actually is. It doesn't feel smaller than Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Indy, KC, or Sacramento, and I find it very hard to believe it feels smaller than most of the other peer cities. It feels slightly smaller than Baltimore, but only slightly so. I've been to both many times, even in recent years (Clt last in '16, Bmore last in '14), including living in Charlotte at one point, and Baltimore is not a city that one feels an enormous size differential from Charlotte in...

Charlotte clearly isn't everyone's taste, but it's downtown is as large or larger than everyone else in its peer group. Combine that with its vibrancy (which is definitely underrated and has several peer downtowns beat), rapid building and population growth, large land area, and all the statistics to back it up, I find it questionable for someone to claim Charlotte feels smaller than it actually is. If your "major cities" list is only the top 5-10 cities in this country, Charlotte isn't a major city, but if your list includes a Top 20, Charlotte is in that conversation for sure, maybe only a spot or two outside of it...

-I'd say it's safe to say Baltimore feels larger than it actually is. I don't think Nashville feels larger than any peer city in size, except Providence, which feels smaller. Nashville is at the ass end (aka the small end) of its peer group and it feels that way...

-Indianapolis does not feel smaller than its size; it feels adequate. Likewise, Birmingham does not feel larger than its size, I don't even know where people get that from. Birmingham has one of the smallest "feels" Of it's peer group, though I'd hesitate to say it feels smaller. It feels adequately placed...

-Richmond "feels" on the larger and of its peer group, though maybe not larger than that group. Sacramento actually surprised me in that it feels comparably sized to peer cities, my assumption was that it would feel smaller....

-when considering Norfolk/Virginia Beach, one has to take into account that it's an oversized metro that combined two metros together. It feels smaller than peer metros. If you look at the cities individually, both Norfolk and Virginia Beach feel the same size, probably because they seamlessly blend into each other; though The Beach has a +200,000 person advantage, it doesnt feel larger than Norfolk. And though Norfolk has a more urban core city, it doesnt feel larger than Virginia Beach, it just has a larger downtown...

They don't operate as one city politically but functionally, in terms of the movement if people and the cultural crossover between both (people attend events in both cities), they are more one city than not, so when viewing them as one city, you have to look at its portion of the Hampton Roads MSA, which is 1.194 million population. The combination of the two or the two taken individually are and look smaller than Richmond in every way, and if you put their 1.194 million with that peer group, it fits right there at the small end. I wouldn't say it feels smaller than that group (Buffalo, Birmingham, Rochester, etc), but it damn sure doesn't feel larger...

-lol Asheville feels slightly larger than its size but let's not get carried away here, it doesnt feel like a big city. Memphis feels country-ish, but it feels larger than people give it credit for. Nashville is bigger, but there is no real demonstrable difference in feeling of size differential. Nashville blows Memphis away in other criteria, but neither "feel" larger than the other...

-Knoxville is definitely a city I think feels larger than its size, it feels very comparable--in size, not necessarily amenities--to any city with an MSA between 1-1.1 million. It does not feel much smaller than Birmingham or Buffalo, only slightly so. Little Rock feels adequately sized, smaller than Knoxville and on the small e.d of its peer group...



Austin has surpassed all of those cities in size and I would take its downtown over CLT or Raleigh hands down.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-27-2017, 10:14 PM
 
Location: California x North Carolina (soon)...
3,320 posts, read 2,241,294 times
Reputation: 3662
Quote:
Originally Posted by walker1962 View Post
Austin has surpassed all of those cities in size and I would take its downtown over CLT or Raleigh hands down.
Okay lol...

Quote:
Originally Posted by walker1962 View Post
Alexandria was never part of the D.C. as was Arlington.
Wrong...

Quote:
Originally Posted by walker1962 View Post
Make the argument it feels larger? How? Nothing you said is not anything any other big metro has.
And Pittsburgh IS larger than Nashville by at least 500K if you look at MSA. Plus, Pitt being an older city in a very hilly area will fell busier because its residents can live in certain areas due to the terrain.
DC has stark differences with Atlanta in terms of daytime commuting population, structural density, population density, the spread of public transportation, DC has more modes of public transportation, far more diversity, far more international flavor, has a greater presence of power and wealth/money than Atlanta, far more pedestrian traffic downtown and citywide, even busier interstate traffic than Atlanta....

Is this enough for you? DC has a noticeable energy and atmosphere that is just at a higher degree than Atlanta. If I wasn't a city stat geek, there's no way I'd think DC and Atlanta were similarly-sized. Like @resident said, not that I think Atlanta is a small city--because it isn't--but DC is and feels larger than Atlanta in every manner; I literally can't think of one measure in which Atlanta "feels" bigger than DC, and I lived in Metro Atlanta and have been in the city many times, and I grew up in the Northern Virginia burbs of DC and have been there even more times...
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-28-2017, 08:17 AM
 
11,493 posts, read 5,551,757 times
Reputation: 5949
Quote:
Originally Posted by _Buster View Post

Beautiful; that is a great way to show how useless that rankings by city proper have become. It should be shown to anyone who can't seem to grasp the concept of arbitrary boundaries.
Jacksonville is known as being a massive sprawl city, not sure what your point is
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-28-2017, 09:40 AM
 
2,548 posts, read 5,128,827 times
Reputation: 743
Quote:
Originally Posted by walker1962 View Post
Well Atlanta is EASILY explained because the city ITSELF is ABOUT 600k. Atlanta, like D.C. is a smallish core city with large suburbs.


Austin, big do you think it is? Its over 900K residents but unlike Atlanta or D.C. has small suburbs. Its still bigger than Charlotte, Raleigh, Memphis and Nashville. If anything, I/m/o, Austin plays bigger than 900K. No metro area in the nation has changed more in the last ten years. This Place Sure Has Changed: Which Cities Have Changed the Most? - MagnifyMoney


Austin has some nationally recognized events in SXSW, Austin City Limits Music Festival and the U.S. Formula One Grand Prix. In my opinion San Antonio is a city that at 1.4 million seems slower that its size would suggest.
San Antonio also has nationally & internationally recognized televised events as well some held every year. Alamo Bowl, Army- All America Bowl, Marquee worldwide Boxing events, NBA Playoffs, Final Four's, and one of the largest Rodeos on the planet. San Antonio also has one of the largest tech gaming conventions Pax South which attracts people worldwide.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top