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Old 04-05-2016, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Seattle aka tier 3 city :)
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San Diego to me feels like an extension of Orange County, in other words, a giant suburb.
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Old 04-05-2016, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
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The small, compact downtown of Pittsburgh works to its advantage in the long term. The times I've visited, I noticed most of the new construction was focused there. The topography of the metro area makes it feel more like several small villages rather than one large urban area. It's not a negative thing at all, just an observation.
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Old 10-20-2017, 12:58 PM
 
Location: South Austin, 78745
2,588 posts, read 1,744,950 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dacoolguy View Post
For some reason I always feel these cities are bigger than what their population says.
1. San Francsico
2. Seattleany
3. Boston
4. Washington DC
5. Atlanta
6. Miami
7. Minneapolis
8. New Orleans
9. Cleveland
10. Pittsburgh

I always thought these cities were smaller than what their population shows.
1. Phoenix
2. San Antonio
3. San Jose
4. Austin
5. Jacksonville
6. Columbus
7. El Paso
8. Oklahoma City
9. Indianapolis
10. Charlotte
The cities that seem bigger on your list have been big cities for quite awhile, so alot of people will think of them as traditionally big American cities and they will feel like a big city.

The cities that seem smaller on your list are fairly new to the big city game, so they will feel like smaller cities to most people, especially the people who remember when those cities were much smaller than what they are now. Those smaller cities on your list I think of as the cities of the future.

What I find interesting is that nearly every small city on your list, except for maybe Oklahoma City and El Paso, has more people living there than any of the big city's on your list ever had.

That's city limits...Not metro area
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Old 10-20-2017, 01:09 PM
 
Location: South Austin, 78745
2,588 posts, read 1,744,950 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Why not just say SW Ohio?
My guess is because Northern Kentucky and Southeast Indiana is included in that 3.2 million population. If you really wanna be accurate and all inclusive, the metro area would be called something like InDayCinTucky.
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Old 10-20-2017, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Seminole County, FL
7,790 posts, read 5,356,139 times
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Montreal (both city AND metro) to me feels bigger than its population suggests. While not small by any means (I think city is 2M and metro is 4.2M) it's always felt more up to par with Chicago, minus the skyline. In terms of urban amenities, it's up there with the largest cities in NA.
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Old 10-20-2017, 04:21 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,404 posts, read 24,408,127 times
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Honolulu feels bigger than it is. Itís much denser and more vibrant than similar sized metro areas.
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Old 10-20-2017, 06:28 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
4,286 posts, read 3,352,979 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBoy205 View Post
Houston feels bigger than 6.6 million people. The city is massive.
Birmingham feels bigger than 1.2 million.
Birmingham feels about the right size it is. Houston does feel massive.
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Old 10-20-2017, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,603 posts, read 1,817,677 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Honolulu feels bigger than it is. Itís much denser and more vibrant than similar sized metro areas.
I bet if you count the tourists that live there temporarily the population would be much higher.
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Old 10-21-2017, 08:01 AM
 
1,875 posts, read 1,241,622 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shakeesha View Post
The small, compact downtown of Pittsburgh works to its advantage in the long term. The times I've visited, I noticed most of the new construction was focused there. The topography of the metro area makes it feel more like several small villages rather than one large urban area. It's not a negative thing at all, just an observation.

Its a strange way to put it. Pittsburgh is a city known for it's neighborhoods. but... several small villages??? Have you never been to the East end? Its continuous urban fabric for a large area. You can walk from downtown, through the Strip to Lawrenceville, Bloomfield, Oakland , Shadyside and East Liberty and its a roughly straight walk through continuous dense urban areas for about 7 miles in a single direction. Downtown is slightly separated from some other areas due to the rivers and a hill, plus a dead zone of 1960s urban renewal gone wrong (uptown). But that is the case in many cities.

Pittsburgh is significantly bigger than Nashville, and it feels way bigger. Also its a lot more dense. Most of the construction isn't downtown, its in Oakland, East liberty, Lawrenceville, and the Strip District.

https://www.bing.com/images/search?v...x=2&ajaxhist=0

http://pittsburghskyline.com/images/...ine.com_23.jpg

https://www.bing.com/images/search?v...=29&ajaxhist=0

Last edited by _Buster; 10-21-2017 at 08:17 AM..
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Old 10-21-2017, 08:16 AM
 
Location: California x North Carolina (soon)...
3,343 posts, read 2,255,906 times
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DC is a 6.1 million person metropolis but I can make the argument it feels larger. The District proper has a daytime population over 1.15 million, and with the easy integration of multiple public transportation systems, complex interstate system, two major airports, heavy pedestrian traffic, it feels more like a city headed towards 10 million...

I wouldn't say Pittsburgh feels "significantly" larger than Nashville, but it does look and feel larger. Nashville feels smaller than most cities it's size, so I'd say Nashville is an example of a city that feels smaller than it actially is, but it is filling in and densifying rapidly...
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