U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Celebrating Memorial Day!
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-21-2017, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
4,317 posts, read 3,382,871 times
Reputation: 3044

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by _Buster View Post
Its a strange way to put it. Pittsburgh is a city known for it's neighborhoods. but... several small villages??? Have you never been to the East end? Its continuous urban fabric for a large area. You can walk from downtown, through the Strip to Lawrenceville, Bloomfield, Oakland , Shadyside and East Liberty and its a roughly straight walk through continuous dense urban areas for about 7 miles in a single direction. Downtown is slightly separated from some other areas due to the rivers and a hill, plus a dead zone of 1960s urban renewal gone wrong (uptown). But that is the case in many cities.

Pittsburgh is significantly bigger than Nashville, and it feels way bigger. Also its a lot more dense. Most of the construction isn't downtown, its in Oakland, East liberty, Lawrenceville, and the Strip District.

https://www.bing.com/images/search?v...x=2&ajaxhist=0

http://pittsburghskyline.com/images/...ine.com_23.jpg

https://www.bing.com/images/search?v...=29&ajaxhist=0
It doesn't to me, it feels smaller than what it is especially the metro area. Cincinnati has the same affect. It feels like several small villages linked together. Both downtowns feel compact and intimate especially compared to some other cities.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-21-2017, 09:28 AM
 
1,889 posts, read 1,251,577 times
Reputation: 1883
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shakeesha View Post
It doesn't to me, it feels smaller than what it is especially the metro area. Cincinnati has the same affect. It feels like several small villages linked together. Both downtowns feel compact and intimate especially compared to some other cities.
What neighborhoods in Pittsburgh have you been to?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-21-2017, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
4,317 posts, read 3,382,871 times
Reputation: 3044
Quote:
Originally Posted by _Buster View Post
What neighborhoods in Pittsburgh have you been to?
Lawrenceville, Garfield, East Liberty, Bloomfield, Oakland, North side, Downtown etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-21-2017, 09:46 AM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
1,988 posts, read 853,789 times
Reputation: 2379
"Looking and Feeling"large vs small are subject to where you go in the metro area/ city.

For example, If you came to visit Dallas and only drove or took the train from the airport to downtown Dallas you would probably get the impression that the metro feels smaller than the 7.2 million that it is. You would probably assume that Philly is larger even though it is over a million smaller.

If you drove across the metroplex as I often do for work and easily wrack up a couple hundred miles in a day, I have no trouble at all believing we have 7.2 million folks in DFW.

The same is true with Phoenix, looking at the downtown it doesn't seem that large, but try to drive across it!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-21-2017, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
4,317 posts, read 3,382,871 times
Reputation: 3044
Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
"Looking and Feeling"large vs small are subject to where you go in the metro area/ city.

For example, If you came to visit Dallas and only drove or took the train from the airport to downtown Dallas you would probably get the impression that the metro feels smaller than the 7.2 million that it is. You would probably assume that Philly is larger even though it is over a million smaller.

If you drove across the metroplex as I often do for work and easily wrack up a couple hundred miles in a day, I have no trouble at all believing we have 7.2 million folks in DFW.

The same is true with Phoenix, looking at the downtown it doesn't seem that large, but try to drive across it!
That's true as well. It will be interesting to see Dallas larger than Chicago some day.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-21-2017, 01:30 PM
 
1,889 posts, read 1,251,577 times
Reputation: 1883
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shakeesha View Post
Lawrenceville, Garfield, East Liberty, Bloomfield, Oakland, North side, Downtown etc.
and these neighborhoods reminded you of small villages? I'm sorry I'm just really not buying that...

Lawrencville is many blocks of dense rowhouses and a long 20 block business district along Butler st.

https://www.bing.com/images/search?v...x=3&ajaxhist=0

Garfield is a mix of housing styles but lots of densely packed SFH and some apts. and most people don't even know they're in Garfield when they are so that is a little strange.

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4655...7i13312!8i6656

East Liberty is an area in transition that used to have a lot of hise rise public housing projects built in the 50s and 60s, but is now where Google is

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4616...7i13312!8i6656

Bloomfiled is a historically Italian neighborhood, and besides several business districts its mostly rowhouses and some apts

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4622...7i13312!8i6656

Oakland has several large universities and a lot of cultural institutions, lots of hospitals and a high rise apartment district, it is quintessentially northeast urban
https://www.bing.com/images/search?v...x=1&ajaxhist=0

https://www.bing.com/images/search?v...x=8&ajaxhist=0

The North Side is also quite urban and is a large neighborhood with several different sections, and kind of hard to get good pictures of. the area was wrecked by interstate 279 going in the 60s. also has a large hospital system, breweries, hotels, casino and stadiums, Andy Warhol Museum, Mattess Factory art installation and exhibitions, etc. Housing is mostly dens rowhomes and a lot of historic ones

https://www.bing.com/images/search?v...x=3&ajaxhist=0

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4472...7i13312!8i6656

Downtown is very dense and urban of course

https://www.bing.com/images/search?v...x=0&ajaxhist=0

https://www.bing.com/images/search?v...x=2&ajaxhist=0


https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4407...7i13312!8i6656

All of these areas are connected to one another, and many times you don't know where one ends and another begins. And Pittsburgh also has other neighborhoods that are large and urban such as Shadyside, the Strip District, Squirrel Hill, and the South side. So I'm not getting how being in those area reminded you of small villages. Is it just that there are lots of different business districts? Do you have a more sunbelt idea of what a city is - lots of highways and strip malls?

Last edited by _Buster; 10-21-2017 at 02:09 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-21-2017, 02:11 PM
 
11,493 posts, read 5,626,691 times
Reputation: 5950
Quote:
Originally Posted by _Buster View Post
and these neighborhoods reminded you of small villages? I'm sorry I'm just really not buying that...

Lawrencville is many blocks of dense rowhouses and a long 20 block business district along Butler st.

https://www.bing.com/images/search?v...x=3&ajaxhist=0

Garfield is a mix of housing styles but lots of densely packed SFH and some apts. and most people don't even know they're in Garfield when they are so that is a little strange.

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4655...7i13312!8i6656

East Liberty is an area in transition that used to have a lot of hise rise public housing projects built in the 50s and 60s, but is now where Google is

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4616...7i13312!8i6656

Bloomfiled is a historically Italian neighborhood, and besides several business districts its mostly rowhouses and some apts

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4622...7i13312!8i6656

Oakland has several large universities and a lot of cultural institutions, lots of hospitals and a high rise apartment district, it is quintessentially northeast urban
https://www.bing.com/images/search?v...x=1&ajaxhist=0

https://www.bing.com/images/search?v...x=8&ajaxhist=0

The North Side is also quite urban and is a large neighborhood with several different sections, and kind of hard to get good pictures of. the area was wrecked by interstate 279 going in the 60s. also has a large hospital system, breweries, hotels, casino and stadiums, Andy Warhol Museum, Mattess Factory art installation and exhibitions, etc. Housing is mostly dens rowhomes and a lot of historic ones

https://www.bing.com/images/search?v...x=3&ajaxhist=0

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4472...7i13312!8i6656

Downtown is very dense and urban of course

https://www.bing.com/images/search?v...x=0&ajaxhist=0

https://www.bing.com/images/search?v...x=2&ajaxhist=0


https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4407...7i13312!8i6656

All of these areas are connected to one another, and many times you don't know where one ends and another begins. And Pittsburgh also has other neighborhoods that are large and urban such as Shadyside, the Strip District, Squirrel Hill, and the South side. So I'm not getting how being in those area reminded you of small villages. Is it just that there are lots of different business districts? Do you have a more sunbelt idea of what a city is - lots of highways and strip malls?
Oakland is not Northeast urban!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-21-2017, 02:17 PM
 
1,709 posts, read 958,429 times
Reputation: 985
For some reason I always feel these cities are bigger than what their population says.
1. Los Angeles
2. Dallas/Ft. Worth
3. Philadelphia
4. Houston
5. Minneapolis (Mainly because of neighboring St. Paul being adjacent to it)


I always thought these cities were smaller than what their population shows.
1. Denver
2. San Diego
3. Austin
4. New Orleans
5. Baltimore
6. Raleigh
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-21-2017, 04:13 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,404 posts, read 24,464,757 times
Reputation: 8775
Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
I bet if you count the tourists that live there temporarily the population would be much higher.
Probably not more than 50k-100k at most, itís not really a popular destination for ďsnowbirdsĒ as itís much more expensive than places like FL or AZ. Also itís all the residential high rises that I think make it feel bigger than it is. You simply donít see that kind of built environment in metros itís size or 3-4x its size.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2017, 09:48 AM
 
442 posts, read 349,656 times
Reputation: 239
Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
"Looking and Feeling"large vs small are subject to where you go in the metro area/ city.

For example, If you came to visit Dallas and only drove or took the train from the airport to downtown Dallas you would probably get the impression that the metro feels smaller than the 7.2 million that it is. You would probably assume that Philly is larger even though it is over a million smaller.

If you drove across the metroplex as I often do for work and easily wrack up a couple hundred miles in a day, I have no trouble at all believing we have 7.2 million folks in DFW.

The same is true with Phoenix, looking at the downtown it doesn't seem that large, but try to drive across it!

So true, I was gonna comment the same thing about San Antonio. People say it feels smaller but if you actually know or drive the city and see how big it actually its easier to understand how SA has 1.million people here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top