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Old 10-22-2017, 08:59 AM
 
448 posts, read 386,920 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IrishIllini View Post
The city limits are massive. Miles upon miles on SF detached housing doesn't necessarily make a region feel "bigger" in an urban sense. Seems we're talking about the urbanity of regions rather than their actual population. Houston does not have the foot traffic you'd see in a place like San Francisco or Portland which tends to make a place feel larger than it actually is.
Houston imo feels massive as well, it goes on and on and has the largest freeway in the country. There are skyscrapers all over the city like 3 or 4 different downtowns.
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Old 10-22-2017, 09:27 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,716,292 times
Reputation: 11120
Quote:
Originally Posted by dacoolguy View Post
For some reason I always feel these cities are bigger than what their population says.
1. San Francsico 46.9 m2
2. Seattle 83.8 m2
3. Boston 48.3 m2
4. Washington DC 61.1 m2
5. Atlanta 133.5 m2
6. Miami 36.0 m2
7. Minneapolis 54.0 m2
8. New Orleans 169.4 m2
9. Cleveland 77.7 m2
10. Pittsburgh 55.4 m2

I always thought these cities were smaller than what their population shows.
1. Phoenix 517.6 m2
2. San Antonio 461.0 m2
3. San Jose 177.5 m2
4. Austin 312.7 m2
5. Jacksonville 747.4 m2
6. Columbus 218.5 m2
7. El Paso 256.8 m2
8. Oklahoma City 606.3 m2
9. Indianapolis 361.5 m2
10. Charlotte 305.4 m2
Isn't the reason obvious?
To put this in some comparative context, the combined land area of San Francisco, Boston, DC, Miami, Minneapolis, and Pittsburgh (301.7 m2) is still less than either Austin (312.7 m2) or Charlotte (305.4 m2) alone. The combined population of the smaller land area cities that make up this comparison is nearly 3.4 million.

An obvious outlier from the OP's perception is New Orleans. By land area, it's quite large for its population and its metro population isn't particularly large.
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Old 10-22-2017, 10:25 AM
 
9,337 posts, read 9,471,240 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
Isn't the reason obvious?
To put this in some comparative context, the combined land area of San Francisco, Boston, DC, Miami, Minneapolis, and Pittsburgh (301.7 m2) is still less than either Austin (312.7 m2) or Charlotte (305.4 m2) alone. The combined population of the smaller land area cities that make up this comparison is nearly 3.4 million.

An obvious outlier from the OP's perception is New Orleans. By land area, it's quite large for its population and its metro population isn't particularly large.
A lot of New Orleans east is uninhabited salt marshes which could as "land" but is pretty generous.
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Old 10-22-2017, 01:35 PM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
4,466 posts, read 2,280,160 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
Isn't the reason obvious?
To put this in some comparative context, the combined land area of San Francisco, Boston, DC, Miami, Minneapolis, and Pittsburgh (301.7 m2) is still less than either Austin (312.7 m2) or Charlotte (305.4 m2) alone. The combined population of the smaller land area cities that make up this comparison is nearly 3.4 million.

An obvious outlier from the OP's perception is New Orleans. By land area, it's quite large for its population and its metro population isn't particularly large.
i made this poll:
favorite metro whose biggest city is < 100 m^2
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Old 10-23-2017, 08:56 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,935 posts, read 3,413,007 times
Reputation: 2416
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
Isn't the reason obvious?
To put this in some comparative context, the combined land area of San Francisco, Boston, DC, Miami, Minneapolis, and Pittsburgh (301.7 m2) is still less than either Austin (312.7 m2) or Charlotte (305.4 m2) alone. The combined population of the smaller land area cities that make up this comparison is nearly 3.4 million.

An obvious outlier from the OP's perception is New Orleans. By land area, it's quite large for its population and its metro population isn't particularly large.
Exactly why people in DC, Boston, SF etc could give a rats tail about city municipal boundaries.

DC for example has it's original 100 sq mi diamond district that includes the 15 sq mi Alexandria, and 26 sq mi Arlington. The population within this 100 sq miles is over 1.1 million which already would be the 10th largest city in the country, and that is still about 1/3 the physical size of the average "major city".

Now of course SF and Boston would jump too in the same scenario of adding their local next door municipalities too.
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Old 10-23-2017, 09:03 AM
 
7,626 posts, read 4,490,605 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Oakland is not Northeast urban!
Thatís not true. Oakland is as urban as half of Boston. Only Greater Downtown Boston (North End through Back Bay), South End and Kenmore are more urban than Oakland.
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Old 10-23-2017, 09:05 AM
 
7,626 posts, read 4,490,605 times
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New Orleans feels like it should anchor a metro of 2 mil+.
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Old 10-23-2017, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,509 posts, read 2,949,609 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
New Orleans feels like it should anchor a metro of 2 mil+.
Well, it was one of the most visited cities in the nation, which would account for its disproportionate "feel", in terms of infrastructure and influence. Post-Katrina, I'm not sure that holds up anymore.
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Old 10-23-2017, 09:30 AM
 
7,626 posts, read 4,490,605 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by qworldorder View Post
Well, it was one of the most visited cities in the nation, which would account for its disproportionate "feel", in terms of infrastructure and influence. Post-Katrina, I'm not sure that holds up anymore.
Itís not just tourism. New Orleans was a top 10 US city by population, and didnít fall out of the top 20 until the 1980 census. It feels like a big city because it was, and it has the legacy infrastructure. Even post Katrina, it feels like a big city.
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Old 10-23-2017, 10:05 AM
 
12,356 posts, read 18,172,799 times
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I think Birmingham feels larger than its population. I think that being Alabama's largest city and metro area helps. It has "big city bones" too.
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