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Old 05-25-2015, 10:34 PM
 
Location: Dallas
282 posts, read 256,977 times
Reputation: 279

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We only have a handful of "real" cities in the U.S

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Old 05-25-2015, 11:35 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,829 posts, read 9,829,915 times
Reputation: 7981
Very cool. Interesting that Philadelphia, which many (and correctly) assume to be a majority rowhome city-has 3% living in suburban areas, the same as Seattle. This is mostly in the far Northwest and Northeast parts of the city.
https://www.google.com/maps/@40.0610...3g!2e0!6m1!1e1
https://www.google.com/maps/@40.0534...JQ!2e0!6m1!1e1

Wow @ Nashville, although it was pretty evident flying in and out of.
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Old 05-25-2015, 11:43 PM
 
Location: Downtown LA
1,192 posts, read 1,226,542 times
Reputation: 848
Interesting chart, but the problem is that it doesn't account for the wildly different style boundaries from city to city. Take Baltimore, for example. It's listed as 0% on the chart. Does that mean Baltimore is completely urban? No, it just means that Baltimore City covers a relatively small area and that most of its suburban neighborhoods (of which there are planty) all fall outside of the city, in Baltimore County.

Whether any suburbs fall within a given city's boundary has as much to do with local geography and historical accident as it has to do with how suburban a metro area is as a whole.
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Old 05-25-2015, 11:51 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,207 posts, read 25,902,249 times
Reputation: 8963
What's the methodology? Because I disagree that Washington D.C. is 100% urban. All you have to do is go around Northwest DC west of Rock Creek Park to see that. Areas up there look pretty suburban.
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Old 05-26-2015, 02:02 AM
 
1,653 posts, read 1,941,474 times
Reputation: 1549
Yeah there is something wrong with Detroit's percentage. Motown is often derided for having a single-family house, suburban layout.



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Old 05-26-2015, 06:22 AM
 
Location: Baltimore
682 posts, read 680,760 times
Reputation: 547
Quote:
Originally Posted by DistrictDirt View Post
Interesting chart, but the problem is that it doesn't account for the wildly different style boundaries from city to city. Take Baltimore, for example. It's listed as 0% on the chart. Does that mean Baltimore is completely urban? No, it just means that Baltimore City covers a relatively small area and that most of its suburban neighborhoods (of which there are planty) all fall outside of the city, in Baltimore County.

Whether any suburbs fall within a given city's boundary has as much to do with local geography and historical accident as it has to do with how suburban a metro area is as a whole.
Okay I have the rundown Urban density: Nearly half of America's biggest cities look like giant suburbs
Kolko and Trulia developed their own definition by asking more than 2,000 adults whether they thought they lived in an urban, suburban, or rural neighborhood. "Our analysis showed that the single best predictor of whether someone said his or her area was urban, suburban or rural was ZIP code density," Kolko explained in an article for Fivethirtyeight this week. "Residents of ZIP codes with more than 2,213 households per square mile typically described their area as urban. Residents of neighborhoods with 102 to 2,213 households per square mile typically called their area suburban."

In 16 of them, more than half the city could be considered suburban, based on density. Eight of them were about two-thirds suburban, or more. Sunbelt cities like like Charlotte, Forth Worth, Phoenix, Tuscon are especially diffuse. Nashville has little more than an urban nub.

Initially, I was surprised by the fact that both New York and Washington, D.C., qualified as 100 percent "urban" by Kolko's measure. Large sections of Queens, where it's not unheard of to find backyard pools and front lawns, seem awfully 'burb-like, as do some wealthier, mansion-studded chunks of Northwest D.C. Even the least urban parts of Queens are still more urban than the average neighborhood in many other cities."
And many other cities, for that matter, barely look like cities at all.

Baltimore's inner city boundary suburban neighborhoods all have a dense population around 5000-8000 people per square mile like in the north Baltimore city neighborhoods of Roland Park and Guilford. So even though there are characteristics of suburban life in the city they are dense and by the data used it is considered to have a kind of urban convenience with suburban charm.

Last edited by Northernest Southernest C; 05-26-2015 at 07:04 AM..
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Old 05-26-2015, 07:22 AM
 
Location: Westside Grand Rapids
3,570 posts, read 3,035,151 times
Reputation: 5492
Quote:
Originally Posted by usroute10 View Post
Yeah there is something wrong with Detroit's percentage. Motown is often derided for having a single-family house, suburban layout.


I think Detroit's percentage makes sense. It's the only city in it's market over 500k and they must consider the entire city urban. Vs Phoenix which has Mese and itself which must be considered almost entirely suburban.
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Old 05-26-2015, 07:28 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
31,575 posts, read 53,103,852 times
Reputation: 14495
Even New York City isnt 100% urban. While I really like this ranking's premise, it's findings are highly questionable.
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Old 05-27-2015, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
4,272 posts, read 3,336,466 times
Reputation: 3001
Quote:
Originally Posted by DistrictDirt View Post
Interesting chart, but the problem is that it doesn't account for the wildly different style boundaries from city to city. Take Baltimore, for example. It's listed as 0% on the chart. Does that mean Baltimore is completely urban? No, it just means that Baltimore City covers a relatively small area and that most of its suburban neighborhoods (of which there are planty) all fall outside of the city, in Baltimore County.

Whether any suburbs fall within a given city's boundary has as much to do with local geography and historical accident as it has to do with how suburban a metro area is as a whole.
Thanks for explaining that.
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Old 05-27-2015, 02:16 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,543 posts, read 17,884,191 times
Reputation: 10686
I'd be interested to know what constitutes a "suburban zip code" and who made that decision. There just seems to be something missing here that makes me dismiss this entire study.
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