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View Poll Results: Overall the city that blends the most attributes of global, international, cosmopolitan, and diversi
Atlanta 33 20.12%
Philadelphia 67 40.85%
Seattle 64 39.02%
Voters: 164. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-01-2015, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lets Eat Candy View Post
Yeah. I mean it might also be a necessity thing since it's a whole lot easier to cross into Canada with a passport than without a passport. There are at least a few people in Northwestern Washington State who commute to somewhere in Vancouver.

By percentage of population who own a passport:
How Many Americans Have a Passport?

Washington: 57.28%
Pennsylvania: 45.11%
Georgia: 38.73%
Here is where people go from these three cities or where people are hosting foreigners from in these three cities by O&D traffic. I'll go with all of the ones over 50,000.

Seattle:
01. Seoul-Incheon, South Korea: 136,718
02. London, United Kingdom: 126,514
03. Tokyo, Japan: 108,244
04. Victoria, Canada: 106,881
05. Vancouver, Canada: 103,192
06. Puerto Vallarta, Mexico: 86,709
07. San Jose Del Cabo, Mexico: 85,521
08. Beijing, China: 71,925
09. Toronto, Canada: 69,177
10. Calgary, Canada: 68,483
11. Paris, France: 64,868
12. Cancun, Mexico: 57,836
13. Taipei, Taiwan: 55,655
14. Manila, Philippines: 55,646

Atlanta:
01. Seoul-Incheon, South Korea: 188,207
02. London, United Kingdom: 185,587
03. Toronto, Canada: 177,215
04. Cancun, Mexico: 165,260
05. Montego Bay, Jamaica: 97,117
06. Montreal, Canada: 84,040
07. Nassau, Bahamas: 74,619
08. Mexico City, Mexico: 73,910
09. Paris, France: 72,536
10. Frankfurt am Main, Germany: 65,001

Philadelphia:
01. Montego Bay, Jamaica: 166,346
02. London, United Kingdom: 152,350
03. Cancun, Mexico: 151,564
04. Toronto, Canada: 112,477
05. Punta Cana, Dominican Republic: 71,236
06. Paris, France: 66,789
07. Rome, Italy: 64,165
08. Frankfurt am Main, Germany: 60,495
09. Montreal, Canada: 53,102

Global Gateways: International Aviation in Metropolitan America | Brookings Institution

Honestly, whether it is total foreign born, or O&D, or huge multinational corporations, or whatever else, I think reasonably most would see the three as pretty much the same tier. Now the question is which one of the three pulls ahead of the other two, that is interesting because so many avenues and boulevards a person can take to make their claim, all of it is legit (so long as the reasoning is rational). I think it is an interesting discussion in the making, honestly. I'm also curious to see what is that one thing or few things that pulls the favors for one over the other two, anyone have any ideas?
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Old 06-01-2015, 01:49 PM
 
Location: ITP - City of Atlanta Proper
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Brown University did an excellent study based off of the 2010 Census that ranked various metros on their diversity. Here are the results from the study. I believe a picture tells a thousand words:

Atlanta
US2010


Philadelphia
US2010


Seattle
US2010
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Old 06-01-2015, 06:32 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
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One other important note regarding migration to these metro areas is that Philadelphia lies within a cadre of cities (also including NYC, Chicago and LA) where domestic net migration and international net migration are in completely opposite directions. This in contrast to both Atlanta and Seattle, which both have comparably positive levels of net domestic and net international migration.

In other words, international migration is a much greater share of Philadelphia's growth. In contrast, the region is simultaneously losing (presumably) its native-born residents. There's no sign of this trend of stopping any time soon, and it will undoubtedly have interesting implications for the city/region over the next few decades, as it re-develops a more global feel that it was once known for a century ago as a major immigrant hub.

Two Very Different Types of Migrations Are Driving Growth in U.S. Cities - CityLab
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Old 06-02-2015, 07:42 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
In other words, international migration is a much greater share of Philadelphia's growth. In contrast, the region is simultaneously losing (presumably) its native-born residents. There's no sign of this trend of stopping any time soon, and it will undoubtedly have interesting implications for the city/region over the next few decades, as it re-develops a more global feel that it was once known for a century ago as a major immigrant hub.

Two Very Different Types of Migrations Are Driving Growth in U.S. Cities - CityLab
International migration may fueling its growth but I doubt it will really develop much of a "global feel," particularly compared to a century ago.

Foreign Born population

New York - 5,564,308 (28.2%)
Los Angeles - 4,400,918 (34.0%)
Bay Area - 2,397,781 (29.0%)
Miami - 2,174,308 (38.3%)
Chicago - 1,699,830 (17.6%)
Washington - 1,245,847 (21.6%)
Boston - 771,081 (16.7%)
Atlanta - 720,983 (13.4%)
Seattle - 591,405 (16.9%)
Philadelphia - 586,013 (9.8%)
Detroit - 379,510 (8.8%)
Portland - 281,081 (12.4%)
Cleveland - 118,205 (5.7%)

Philly clearly has a ways to go in this department. It is about as international as Detroit and less international than Portland--two cities most people probably don't think of as being particularly cosmopolitan.
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Old 06-02-2015, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Philly clearly has a ways to go in this department. It is about as international as Detroit and less international than Portland--two cities most people probably don't think of as being particularly cosmopolitan.
Again, though, if the metro area gains approximately 20K in international migrants per year, and loses, say, 15K native-born folks per year, that's having a greater net effect, and it won't take long for the percentage of foreign-born to start creeping upward.

Surely it won't happen overnight, but that's exactly what happened to several other cities--the trend was just delayed in Philly.
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Old 06-02-2015, 01:18 PM
 
Location: ITP - City of Atlanta Proper
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
Again, though, if the metro area gains approximately 20K in international migrants per year, and loses, say, 15K native-born folks per year, that's having a greater net effect, and it won't take long for the percentage of foreign-born to start creeping upward.

Surely it won't happen overnight, but that's exactly what happened to several other cities--the trend was just delayed in Philly.
I wonder how many of those folks are people who first moved to NYC, then moved to Philly for the cheaper COL, but still commute to NYC for work?
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Old 06-02-2015, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
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It is interesting, my personal thought was that if any of the three has the slight edge currently it would be Atlanta but these City-Data polls are always interesting like that as it trails the other two by a bit.

I could definitely see the argument for any of the three though and I am not suggesting anything otherwise or to the contrary. Just that I personally thought on paper Atlanta looked the best rounded of the three, and it is further behind in the polls so something hasn't registered yet.

In the future, I think Seattle. Seattle just has to grow more of a business cachet overseas than it already has and I think it'll be good. It has the demographics and the seaport already but I think Atlanta's been a better draw for global multinational corporations to this point.
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Old 06-02-2015, 04:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red John View Post
It is interesting, my personal thought was that if any of the three has the slight edge currently it would be Atlanta but these City-Data polls are always interesting like that as it trails the other two by a bit.

I could definitely see the argument for any of the three though and I am not suggesting anything otherwise or to the contrary. Just that I personally thought on paper Atlanta looked the best rounded of the three, and it is further behind in the polls so something hasn't registered yet.

In the future, I think Seattle. Seattle just has to grow more of a business cachet overseas than it already has and I think it'll be good. It has the demographics and the seaport already but I think Atlanta's been a better draw for global multinational corporations to this point.
Atlanta has recently gotten a lot more European investment...a few European Tech companies are putting their NA Headquarters in Atlanta...and then we just got 2 giants: Mercedes and Porche...both European automotive companies who moved their NA HQ to Atlanta.

I would like to see more Asian corporations set up camp in Atlanta, but I can easily see why they would prefer a Seattle or Sf or even a Houston.

But to your point of Atlanta trailing behind...I mean, there's a huge anti-Atlanta bias on these type of forums simply because it's not urban and it's in the south. If Atlanta was in the west or midwest, it would win a lot more polls on City-Data.
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Old 06-02-2015, 07:45 PM
 
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I think people are confusing sophisticated white people with top tier college degrees and experience studying or living abroad for some time with actually being "international".

I would guess CC Philly has the most educated, most traveled young professionals of any of these cities, and I would venture a guess the vast majority are white. Outside of that, Philly to me seems like a more blue collar black/white town.

Atlanta *is* more diverse, but still feels largely black + white with some Asians/Hispanics sprinkled in, and as another poster alluded to, the real diversity is in the suburbs, on the highways (where people spend a lot of time in their own cars), etc etc.

Seattle approaches the urbanity of Philly on a smaller level, but definitely has more global interest, is more globally connected, has more foreigners, and is more diverse.

I voted for Seattle, though based on a set of criteria and how one breaks statistics down and combines sheer facts with subjective perception/observation, then it could be either Philly or Atlanta next. I'd probably say Philly based on some of the more subjective criteria (truly urban environments lend themselves to a higher degree of cosmopolitanism, in my opinion, even if stats on paper don't tell that particular story).
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Old 06-02-2015, 11:24 PM
 
Location: ITP - City of Atlanta Proper
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anonelitist View Post
I think people are confusing sophisticated white people with top tier college degrees and experience studying or living abroad for some time with actually being "international".

I would guess CC Philly has the most educated, most traveled young professionals of any of these cities, and I would venture a guess the vast majority are white. Outside of that, Philly to me seems like a more blue collar black/white town.

Atlanta *is* more diverse, but still feels largely black + white with some Asians/Hispanics sprinkled in, and as another poster alluded to, the real diversity is in the suburbs, on the highways (where people spend a lot of time in their own cars), etc etc.

Seattle approaches the urbanity of Philly on a smaller level, but definitely has more global interest, is more globally connected, has more foreigners, and is more diverse.

I voted for Seattle, though based on a set of criteria and how one breaks statistics down and combines sheer facts with subjective perception/observation, then it could be either Philly or Atlanta next. I'd probably say Philly based on some of the more subjective criteria (truly urban environments lend themselves to a higher degree of cosmopolitanism, in my opinion, even if stats on paper don't tell that particular story).
I disagree on some of what you wrote, but you bring up a salient point: it's a matter of perception.

While it may seem that way, Atlanta literally is the more diverse/cosmopolitan/international city on paper among the three. However, this is a relatively new thing. In 1990, there were just 55,000 Latinos in Metro Atlanta and Now there 547,000. The same is true of the Asian population which was 49,000 in 1990 and now 254,000.

As the saying goes "Rome wasn't built in a day" and these communities along with the Native African and European communities (which have also grown significantly in the last 20 years but not as dramatically) will take a while to have an impact on total culture of the city. However, it is not as if they've had no impact.

While it is true that epicenter of Atlanta's immigrant culture is in the Northeast burbs (which by the way were lily white america in the 90s, and In the case of Gwinnett redneck central) it's not as if it is confined there. These people go to work, shop, party, and go to entertainment events in the city center just like everyone else and you'll see them all in great numbers everywhere. These communities are even starting to open businesses and live in urban districts like Midtown and eastern Downtown. Chinese and Koreans in particular are leading the charge and are "starting to takeover" neighborhoods like Lenox/North Buckhead.

So yeah, perception-wise Atlanta isn't really there yet in the national consciousness it will be real soon. One thing that has a lot of buzz is that there is a good chance that a popular Asian city councilman is one of the big front runners to be the next mayor. Some people outside Atlanta might find that statement farfetched, but it's where this city is headed.
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