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View Poll Results: Most similar area to Charlotte
Raleigh/Durham, NC 14 22.58%
Greensboro/Winston-Salem, NC 1 1.61%
Columbia, SC 6 9.68%
Greenville/Spartanburg, SC 2 3.23%
Atlanta, GA 23 37.10%
Nashville, TN 10 16.13%
Dallas/Ft. Worth, TX 3 4.84%
Other 3 4.84%
Voters: 62. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-05-2015, 08:48 AM
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Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
Unless you're ready to settle down in the suburbs and start a family, stay away from Raleigh/Durham and Charlotte. Basically what I tell everyone. We're (Raleigh) not the area where you hit up clubs chasing women or men around.
Seems to me there'd be plenty for a single person in the Raleigh area. It's not some sleepy suburb. It's a big city, you just might have to try a little harder than you would in other places.
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Old 06-07-2015, 11:47 AM
 
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Of the options listed...Nashville. Atlanta is way too large to be similar to Charlotte and very different historically. They are both fast-growing metros with shiny new skylines and that's about where the similarities end. Nashville is a bit more in Charlotte's league.
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Old 06-07-2015, 11:56 AM
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Location: Trumpville
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Downtown and uptown Dallas have a similar feel to Charlotte. Highland Park is somewhat similar to the Myers Park area of Charlotte. Of course DFW as a whole is very different than the Charlotte metropolitan area but there are more similarities than most realize.
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Old 06-08-2015, 09:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
Of the options listed...Nashville. Atlanta is way too large to be similar to Charlotte and very different historically. They are both fast-growing metros with shiny new skylines and that's about where the similarities end. Nashville is a bit more in Charlotte's league.
There's an argument to be made for Nashville, but Atlanta and Charlotte have more similarities that definitely go beyond growth rates and new architecture.
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Old 06-09-2015, 03:09 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
There's an argument to be made for Nashville, but Atlanta and Charlotte have more similarities that definitely go beyond growth rates and new architecture.
Like what? Tell us. A bunch of bland suburbs? The city of Atlanta is nothing like the city of Charlotte.

Atlanta has much better nightlife, better neighborhoods, an extremely diverse economy, high concentration of wealth in Buckhead, much better shopping(this doesn't compare),liberal, LGBQT capital, a large hip hop scene(unheard of in Charlotte), and a downtown that feels far more historic.

To me, outside of what he said and bland suburbs, they don't resemble each other. Maybe demographics and high growing black pop., but that's it.
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Old 06-09-2015, 06:51 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Like what? Tell us. A bunch of bland suburbs? The city of Atlanta is nothing like the city of Charlotte.

Atlanta has much better nightlife, better neighborhoods, an extremely diverse economy, high concentration of wealth in Buckhead, much better shopping(this doesn't compare),liberal, LGBQT capital, a large hip hop scene(unheard of in Charlotte), and a downtown that feels far more historic.

To me, outside of what he said and bland suburbs, they don't resemble each other. Maybe demographics and high growing black pop., but that's it.
In terms of their oldest urban neighborhoods (streetcar suburbs), the two cities have similarities. Grant Park, Inman Park, Old Fourth Ward, Virginia-Highland, Ansley Park, Cabbagetown, Druid Hills, Candler Park, etc. are very similar to Fourth Ward, Dilworth, Myers Park, Elizabeth, Wilmore, Plaza-Midwood, Wesley Heights, NoDa, etc. in terms architecture and vibe. For both cities, these neighborhoods give you a much better sense of the city's identity and character than their downtowns. And of course, as Southern Piedmont cities, both have characteristics inherent to the region geographically and historically, such as the rolling hills, tree cover, their historic status as significant railroad hubs (Atlanta more so than Charlotte), textile industry, etc. Both have rivers that run through/near the city but nowhere close to downtown. Stock car racing has played a role in the history of each city (Charlotte more so than Atlanta). As Atlanta is central to a large swath of the Southeast and serves as a hub for the region, Charlotte is central to the Carolinas and acts as its primary hub. And of course, both are big business centers in the Southeast, probably the two biggest.

Of course they have several differences as you stated, which is why I cringe when people claim Charlotte is just a "mini-Atlanta," but the similarities certainly go beyond a bunch of sprawling suburbs. But you're really not all that familiar with Charlotte based on reading some stuff you've said in the past, so I'm not surprised that you think the way you do--which is interesting because casual visitors to Atlanta often say the same things you say about Charlotte (nothing but sprawl, no history whatsoever, no interesting neighborhoods, blah blah blah).
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Old 06-09-2015, 02:17 PM
 
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I have to agree I see a lot of similarities in Atlanta and Charlotte that if nothing else come from both being in the southern Piedmont and because they are the only two sizable cities in this region. Growing up in South Carolina you always compare Charlotte and Atlanta even though we all know Atlanta is bigger.

Also Charlotte has a lot more for a city its size like the CLT airport being one of the busiest in the country, banking headquarters, etc. Charlotte to me has a lot more than many cities much bigger so I think some similarities outside of simply size can be made as well.

As for Charlotte peer cities ive always looked at San Antonio, Nashville, Jacksonville
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Old 06-10-2015, 07:36 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ColaClemsonFan11 View Post
I have to agree I see a lot of similarities in Atlanta and Charlotte that if nothing else come from both being in the southern Piedmont and because they are the only two sizable cities in this region. Growing up in South Carolina you always compare Charlotte and Atlanta even though we all know Atlanta is bigger.

Also Charlotte has a lot more for a city its size like the CLT airport being one of the busiest in the country, banking headquarters, etc. Charlotte to me has a lot more than many cities much bigger so I think some similarities outside of simply size can be made as well.

As for Charlotte peer cities ive always looked at San Antonio, Nashville, Jacksonville
Atlanta is bigger, but try more than twice bigger. I don't really see a lot of similarities between Charlotte and Atlanta, but I know it's convenient for people to imagine them just because of their locations and population booms. The cities look so completely different to me that I jus can't imagine what is similar about them.

There are actually several sizable metros in the southern Piedmont...Richmond, the Triangle, the Triad, Greenville-Spartanburg, and Birmingham.
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Old 06-11-2015, 12:23 AM
 
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I find it interesting that some people get so defensive about comparing the likes of Atlanta, Charlotte, and Nashville. All 3 are definitely unique in their own ways, but I think you have to be kidding yourself if you can't find some commonalities in their makeup.

Charlotte is not a mini-Atlanta, and neither is Nashville...but as a consequence of where and when the cities developed, you can definitely see some similarities. All 3 are New South powerhouses that have shiny new urban centers with a bit less urban grit than their more historically industrial Northeastern and Midwestern counterparts, and all 3 are surrounded by quite a large amount of sprawl. They are certainly not the only cities in the South that fit this description -- in fact, many do. But even in comparison to our Texas cousins, Atlanta, Charlotte, and Nashville resemble each other much more than any resemble Dallas, Houston, or San Antonio in city layout (Austin is a bit of an enigma to me).

You could also point to some cultural characteristics -- such as none of the cities being true "Deep South" cities, as well as all being on the fringes, but not within the Appalachian region.
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Old 06-11-2015, 05:59 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
In terms of their oldest urban neighborhoods (streetcar suburbs), the two cities have similarities. Grant Park, Inman Park, Old Fourth Ward, Virginia-Highland, Ansley Park, Cabbagetown, Druid Hills, Candler Park, etc. are very similar to Fourth Ward, Dilworth, Myers Park, Elizabeth, Wilmore, Plaza-Midwood, Wesley Heights, NoDa, etc. in terms architecture and vibe. For both cities, these neighborhoods give you a much better sense of the city's identity and character than their downtowns. And of course, as Southern Piedmont cities, both have characteristics inherent to the region geographically and historically, such as the rolling hills, tree cover, their historic status as significant railroad hubs (Atlanta more so than Charlotte), textile industry, etc. Both have rivers that run through/near the city but nowhere close to downtown. Stock car racing has played a role in the history of each city (Charlotte more so than Atlanta). As Atlanta is central to a large swath of the Southeast and serves as a hub for the region, Charlotte is central to the Carolinas and acts as its primary hub. And of course, both are big business centers in the Southeast, probably the two biggest.

Of course they have several differences as you stated, which is why I cringe when people claim Charlotte is just a "mini-Atlanta," but the similarities certainly go beyond a bunch of sprawling suburbs. But you're really not all that familiar with Charlotte based on reading some stuff you've said in the past, so I'm not surprised that you think the way you do--which is interesting because casual visitors to Atlanta often say the same things you say about Charlotte (nothing but sprawl, no history whatsoever, no interesting neighborhoods, blah blah blah).
This is an awesome post Mutiny. I can't understand, for the life of me, why some ATL folks crap on Charlotte so hard. Any reasonable person knows Charlotte is not on the same level as ATL, by any stretch, but there are still plenty of comparable similarities. Any dope that's actually spent more than an afternoon in the two can tell you that.

I find it incredibly ironic that some boosters from ATL, who have to put up with so much false BS on CD, turn around and do the exact same thing to Charlotte. It'd be great if the folks from ATL, Charlotte, Nashville, Raleigh ect. stopped spending so much time putting down each other and started focusing on promoting the SE and it's progressive booming cities as a whole. There's enough trash online that we have to deal with already. Lets try our best to avoid the friendly fire.
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