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Old 05-31-2015, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Montreal
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From what I remember, all these cities are pretty hilly. And in fact, Pittsburgh and the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre area are pretty similar in that they're both in the mountains of Pennsylvania (albeit in different corners of the state) and they're both in coal-mining country. I'm wondering: a) Is Pittsburgh more hilly or less hilly than Scranton or Wilkes-Barre? b) Are both of these Pennsylvania metro areas hillier than Cincinnati? How do the two Pennsylvania metro areas mentioned here compare to Charleston, West Virginia?
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Old 05-31-2015, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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Charleston itself is actually pretty flat because it's located in a river valley, but it's surrounded by mountains.
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Old 05-31-2015, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Montreal
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In partially answering one of my own questions, from having gone to one part of Pittsburgh and one part of Cincinnati, it seems to me that Cincy hills are rolling where Pittsburgh hills are rugged. Does that sound right?
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Old 05-31-2015, 01:51 PM
 
Location: alexandria, VA
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The "Burgh" is very hilly. Steep hills too. After all, it's smack in the middle of the Alleghany Plateau.
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Old 05-31-2015, 04:43 PM
 
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Wilkes Barre is quite a bit hillier than Pittsburgh, granted I haven't been to Pittsburgh in like 5 years. Even the retail areas are all at different elevations, like the abandoned Walmart thats foundation was at the same height as the top of the Wegmans that is a couple minute walk. Its main roads aren't too steep, but always sloping some direction, like coming up past Dallas or down when coming from Tunkhannock. Residential streets can be pretty steep. The Wyoming Valleys elevation varies from 400-2400. Pittsburgh's ranges from 700-1300.
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Old 05-31-2015, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ghdana View Post
Wilkes Barre is quite a bit hillier than Pittsburgh, granted I haven't been to Pittsburgh in like 5 years. Even the retail areas are all at different elevations, like the abandoned Walmart thats foundation was at the same height as the top of the Wegmans that is a couple minute walk. Its main roads aren't too steep, but always sloping some direction, like coming up past Dallas or down when coming from Tunkhannock. Residential streets can be pretty steep. The Wyoming Valleys elevation varies from 400-2400. Pittsburgh's ranges from 700-1300.
Looking at it online, Wilkes-Barre, at least within the city proper, doesn't seem to have the rugged topography changes Pitsburgh does. I mean, Pittsburgh basically has a mountain directly across from Downtown. It's hard to beat that.

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Old 06-01-2015, 07:37 AM
 
Location: Northeast Suburbs of PITTSBURGH
3,492 posts, read 3,309,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ghdana View Post
Wilkes Barre is quite a bit hillier than Pittsburgh, granted I haven't been to Pittsburgh in like 5 years. Even the retail areas are all at different elevations, like the abandoned Walmart thats foundation was at the same height as the top of the Wegmans that is a couple minute walk. Its main roads aren't too steep, but always sloping some direction, like coming up past Dallas or down when coming from Tunkhannock. Residential streets can be pretty steep. The Wyoming Valleys elevation varies from 400-2400. Pittsburgh's ranges from 700-1300.
The Wyoming valley is only built up in the valley.

Also, comparing the elevation change of a city of 55 sq miles to a metro is not an accurate way of comparison. Also where in the valley is the elevation 400?

Pittsburghs metro varies from 600' in beaver to 3000' in Westmoreland and Fayette counties.
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