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View Poll Results: Pittsburgh vs Minneapolis
Pittsburgh 80 41.88%
Mineeapolis 95 49.74%
Both pretty much the same 16 8.38%
Voters: 191. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-14-2015, 08:33 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
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Some people are trying to imply that Minneapolis has a higher crime rate than Pittsburgh, and others are trying to imply that Minneapolis is sterile and squeaky-clean.

Which one is it?

There's quite an awful lot of grit in Minneapolis. However, there really isn't any wide-scale abandonment or urban prairies like you find in some neighborhoods of Pittsburgh.
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Old 06-15-2015, 08:03 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
11,921 posts, read 11,065,670 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennifat View Post
There's quite an awful lot of grit in Minneapolis. However, there really isn't any wide-scale abandonment or urban prairies like you find in some neighborhoods of Pittsburgh.
Pittsburgh probably does have more blight than Minneapolis, since we had a much steeper population decline. But compared to other rust belt cities, blight is relatively minor here. You don't see one side of the city almost entirely trashed, like you do with cities like Cleveland or Saint Louis. Out of the 90 official neighborhoods we have, probably around 10 are highly blighted, with an equal number showing significant gaps due to demolition.

One thing we really don't have much of is urban prairie. Partially this is because prairie implies flat empty areas due to demolition. Pittsburgh has never had tons of flat land compared to most cities, and most of the flat neighborhoods have remained relatively desirable. Californa-Kirkbride and Homewood are the only two flat areas I can think of where entire city blocks have been demolished (discounting areas being cleared in preparation for redevelopment).

The more common thing in Pittsburgh is the slow abandonment/demolition of houses on steep slopes and winding roads, which basically results in forestland taking back over, with the remaining houses on the street increasingly looking like some backwoods part of West Virginia. This is one of the most extreme examples I know of. Here's another. And another.

Note that not all blighted neighborhoods in Pittsburgh are dangerous ghettos. Spring Garden looks like **** in places, but it's not particularly high crime.
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Old 06-15-2015, 10:36 AM
 
5,805 posts, read 8,341,198 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _Buster View Post
Well, you're pretty misinformed. People aren't moving away from the Pittsburgh area en masse, or at all. That happened more than 30 years ago when the steel industry collapsed. As a result Pgh had an older population for most of the past 30 years, but now the demographics have changed and more people are moving in than leaving. The population has stabilized.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craziaskowboi View Post
They're not doing that in Pittsburgh, though. Here's the real problem:



On the other hand, notice how more people are moving in than out.
Save your statements as templates, so that you can just keep Copy and Pasting. Because you're gonna have to keep explaining this Over and Over and Over again.

People really have this overly simplistic view of "Loss of Population =People fleeing in droves" like there can't be any other explanation.
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Old 06-15-2015, 04:20 PM
 
1,172 posts, read 1,188,265 times
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Originally Posted by DesertMan101 View Post
Reading these forums, I can't help but feel like MSP is pretty over hyped.
LOL! Overhyped when compared to whom? MSP does very well for itself and has more to offer (in some cases a lot more) than most metros in the 1 - 4 million range, including Phoenix. That said, why don't you get off your computer or phone and visit instead making such ridiculous statements?

Last edited by YIMBY; 06-15-2015 at 04:39 PM..
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Old 06-15-2015, 04:28 PM
 
1,172 posts, read 1,188,265 times
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Originally Posted by bradjl2009 View Post
Wrong again 'Polo Bro'. Here are the top 10 most concentrated 'Millennial markets' - GeekWire

Pittsburgh practically has the same amount of 20 somethings as Minneapolis.
According to the 2010 Census, Minneapolis had 124,395 people in the 20 - 34 age range, Pittsburgh had 93,952. With St. Paul there were 201,302 so no, it's not that close.

As of 2013, the 20 - 34 age range for the core cities: MPLS - STPL: 208,391, Pittsburgh: 94,015.
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Old 06-16-2015, 07:14 AM
 
1,889 posts, read 1,253,677 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YIMBY View Post
According to the 2010 Census, Minneapolis had 124,395 people in the 20 - 34 age range, Pittsburgh had 93,952. With St. Paul there were 201,302 so no, it's not that close.

As of 2013, the 20 - 34 age range for the core cities: MPLS - STPL: 208,391, Pittsburgh: 94,015.
So you are adding another city, and comparing an area in Minnesota that is more than twice the land area as the city of Pittsburgh limits? and you think that's a valid comparison?

Last edited by _Buster; 06-16-2015 at 08:08 AM..
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Old 06-16-2015, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
20,355 posts, read 20,541,636 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _Buster View Post
So you are adding another city, and comparing an area in Minnesota that is more than twice the land area as the city of Pittsburgh limits? and you think that's a valid comparison?
most connected twin city pairings ?
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Old 06-16-2015, 08:50 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Ghengis View Post
which has nothing whatsoever to do with my point

for any meaningful comparison you need to use comparables. meaning probably msa or urban area, not selectively picked city limit populations. Pittsburgh is more connected to the immediate cities surrounding it than Minneapolis is to St. Paul. But it's surrounding urban areas were not included in YIMBY's post.

you are going to get skewed results when comparing stats on a land area in Minnestoa that's more than twice as large as the one in Pittsburgh. this shouldn't be difficult to understand.
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Old 06-16-2015, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
29,643 posts, read 65,800,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _Buster View Post
which has nothing whatsoever to do with my point

for any meaningful comparison you need to use comparables. meaning probably msa or urban area, not selectively picked city limit populations. Pittsburgh is more connected to the immediate cities surrounding it than Minneapolis is to St. Paul. But it's surrounding urban areas were not included.

you are going to get skewed results when comparing stats on a land area in Minnestoa that's more than twice as large as the one in Pittsburgh. this shouldn't be difficult to understand.
It's really tough, though, to draw the "lines" here. For example, Pittsburgh seamlessly flows into adjacent municipalities like Edgewood, Swissvale, Wilkinsburg, Mt. Oliver, and Dormont. With that being said Minneapolis also flows pretty seamlessly into Edina (do a Google Street View of South France Avenue & W. 50th St. as a prime example). St. Paul and Maplewood (home of 3M) flow pretty seamlessly into one another as well.
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Old 06-16-2015, 09:12 AM
 
1,889 posts, read 1,253,677 times
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Originally Posted by SteelCityRising View Post
It's really tough, though, to draw the "lines" here. For example, Pittsburgh seamlessly flows into adjacent municipalities like Edgewood, Swissvale, Wilkinsburg, Mt. Oliver, and Dormont. With that being said Minneapolis also flows pretty seamlessly into Edina (do a Google Street View of South France Avenue & W. 50th St. as a prime example). St. Paul and Maplewood (home of 3M) flow pretty seamlessly into one another as well.
yup, which is why for most of these types of things, urban area or just MSA is used. but at the minimum, if someone was summing up city limits, they should at least try to get comparable land areas to compare.
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