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View Poll Results: Pittsburgh vs Minneapolis
Pittsburgh 80 41.88%
Mineeapolis 95 49.74%
Both pretty much the same 16 8.38%
Voters: 191. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-06-2015, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Limbo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
Most Midwesterners flock to those cities just for the weather.
Most? I highly doubt that's true.

People get used to the summers in the southeast just as they get used to the winters in the mid-west.
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Old 07-06-2015, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Miami Beach, FL/Tokyo, Japan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emcee squared View Post
Most? I highly doubt that's true.

People get used to the summers in the southeast just as they get used to the winters in the mid-west.
The summers in the southeast are a cake walk compared to the winters in the Midwest.

Pretty much the entire Michigan is relocating to states like Florida, Texas or Arizona. Ask any Michigander and they will say the weather in the South is better save for a tiny anomaly of people.
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Old 07-06-2015, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
The summers in the southeast are a cake walk compared to the winters in the Midwest.

Pretty much the entire Michigan is relocating to states like Florida, Texas or Arizona. Ask any Michigander and they will say the weather in the South is better save for a tiny anomaly of people.
Every Michigander I ever met told me they hated Florida.
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Old 07-06-2015, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
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I'm a Floridian who lived in Chicago and found the winters more tolerable there than summertime in FL. It's just a personal preference although several of my friends who made the same move as me (lived in Chicago but originally from Jax) all felt the same.

I guess it's hard to make a generalization one way or another.
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Old 07-06-2015, 11:47 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clevelander1991 View Post
Nightlife: Don't Know, haven't been around both enough
Culture: Pittsburgh
Shopping: What kind? Pittsburgh doesn't have a MOA, Minny doesn't have a Carson Street
Dining: Pittsburgh
Scenery: Pittsburgh
Outdoor Activities: Pittsburgh
Crime Rate: Minneapolis? Not sure
Economy: Even
Weather: Pittsburgh
Quality of Life: Pittsburgh
Higher Education: Pittsburgh
Location: Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh with a pretty easy victory IMO, though both cities are nice.
lol
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Old 07-06-2015, 12:16 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackbeauty212 View Post
This one comes down to who ever has the most Homers/Boosters.... Doubt very many have actually been to both Cities to make a fair comparison, even though they are comparable based on certain metrics.
Well put.

I, fortunately, have lived in both. Both are great cities. I may be able to make a fair, reasonable comparison:

Nightlife: Minneapolis, by a hair. I think that the nightlife in Minneapolis (outside of Hennepin and 1st Avenues) appeals more to my late-20's demographic than the Southside, though (which would be more fun for college kids with fake IDs)

Culture: This could mean many things. As far as high culture goes....it's a real push. I prefer the MIA to the Carnegie Museum of Art, but I prefer Carnegie's Natural History Museum to anything comparable we have in the Twin Cities (which would include the Minnesota History Museum and Bell Museum, I suppose).

Minneapolis is a leader in live theater, music, stand-up comedy, dance, and I much prefer Minneapolis's offerings of galleries and free art events. Pittsburgh does all of these things well, though, and one could argue it does a few better...

Shopping: Um....neither are really known for it. Shadyside's offering of boutiques and local places beats out Uptown or 50th and France, though, in my opinion. So I guess I'll give it to Pittsburgh?

(side bar: clevelander1991, if you think Carson Street is a major shopping district, or that Minneapolis has nothing like it, then it's obvious you haven't spent much time in either city...)

Dining: Minneapolis. And this one ain't close. But both cities were awful restaurant towns up until 10-20 years ago, and in both, the restaurant scene has really emerged. Minneapolis is just a little further on the trajectory than Pittsburgh is, at this point.

Scenery: Pittsburgh, and it ain't close. (as far as natural scenery goes, anyway. If you want downtown or city-scape: they pretty much tie for skyline, when you talk about it objectively and don't consider that Pittsburgh's hills provide more dramatic vantage points. I prefer Pittsburgh's residential architecture, too-- it's rowhouses, georgian style buildings that I remember in Shadyside, and all of the houses of Squirrel Hill, Point Breeze, etc. Minneapolis isn't bad in this regard, but I do prefer Pittsburgh. Also, as far as parkland goes, while Minneapolis's system is more extensive, it consists mostly of small community parks. Schenley and Highland Parks are in-your-face, stately, early-century, palaces to leisure)

Outdoor Activities: Minneapolis. Pittsburgh's largest parks are gorgeous, but the system is not integrated with trails and bike paths like Minneapolis's is. Also, Pittsburgh has few (if any) urban lakes. I do think Pittsburgh has done a better job overall of utilizing its river(s) for recreational purposes. And I am told you can bike from the Southside all the way to DC! (I don't bike...). I also think that Minneapolis, overall, has better outdoor recreation closer by than Pittsburgh does. If you're really into hills, the North Shore by Duluth is easy to get to and provides similar options for hiking and skiing as Western Pennsylvania. But Ohiopyle doesn't hold a candle to the lakes and state park options near Minneapolis.

Crime: Supposedly Minneapolis's crime rate is higher, overall. But to be honest, they are both very safe cities, and if you avoid certain neighborhoods (the Hill in Pittsburgh, or Jordan in Minneapolis), you will be properly insulated from crime.

Economy: Probably even, when all is said and done. Probably very comparable unemployment rates and job creation. Pittsburgh is a little lower salary on average, but more than cheaper enough to offset the difference. In fact, I was amazed with how easily people were able to buy houses in Pittsburgh, given their ages and incomes.

Weather: Pittsburgh, and it ain't even close. The typical Minneapolis apologist will talk about how we tolerate winters because the summers are "beautiful." Weather-wise, the summers are better in Pittsburgh, there are fewer mosquitoes and the winter's aren't nearly as bad. Pittsburgh actually gets four seasons, too....Minneapolis really doesn't. Unless your seasons are Winter, Thaw, Summer, and pre-Winter blizzard season.

Quality of Life: Um....I think it's probably easier to get ahead in Pittsburgh. Traffic is a little better, from my observation, although Minneapolis isn't bad in that regard. the weather thing certainly impacts quality of life, too.

Higher Education: Pittsburgh. But if you throw St. Paul (Macalester, St. Thomas, St. Kates, Hamline, William Mitchell, Concordia) into the mix, and Northfield (Carleton, St. Olaf), then Minneapolis has a fighting chance. The U is an elite public research institution....and Minneapolis has some other smaller colleges like Augsburg. But Pittsburgh has Pitt, CMU, Chatham, Carlow, Duquesne and Point Park all within city-limits. There may be fewer undergrad and grad students in Pittsburgh total, but they probably make up a higher percentage of the population. And all of the programs in Pittsburgh are comparable or better than in Minneapolis (except maybe Law). So, yeah...Pittsburgh.

Location: Pittsburgh. Minneapolis is too isolated. Pittsburgh is about equidistant from New York and Chicago, with lots of cool cities in between.

So....in my opinion, I guess it's 6-4 Pittsburgh, with a couple of ties?
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Old 07-06-2015, 12:18 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clevelander1991 View Post
Wow.... I suppose it is in big part influenced by how many people from there are on the board...

Minneapolis might win for economy and sheer acreage of park space...

But for history, high culture, regional location, weather, higher education, variety of outdoor opportunities, etc., neighborhood feel/mom & pops, it strikes me that Pittsburgh would win rather handily. Would anyone dispute that? I'm not meaning to say that Minneapolis isn't an attractive city or that it doesn't have those other things, just that Pittsburgh at least from an objective standpoint would seem to have "more" and "better".
Have you ever been to Minneapolis? Answer honestly, please.
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Old 07-06-2015, 12:23 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clevelander1991 View Post
High Culture: I can't speak to literary publishing as a criterion as I'm not well versed enough to comment on it. I suppose in general I should've expanded it. I was also including museums into the equation. As good as Minny's museums may be, they likely don't have a single one as dynamic as the Carnegie Museum of Natural History. Also, since it's a legacy city, maybe I'm biased in favor of those being from Cleveland, but unless Minny had a significant financier at a certain point in time, I can't imagine either the Walker or the MMA as matching the Carnegie Museum of Art either, at least not on range and esteem of collection is concerned. Carnegie Museum of Art - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Again, admittedly some of this I'm attributing to Pittsburgh due to assumption of strong similarities to Cleveland, which is quite possibly in Top 5 in America in terms of museums/high culture. I guess I included other things also, the Heinz History and Architecture Center, the Cathedral of Learning at Pitt. Not to mention the Warhol Museum is there also. I see that both the Pittsburgh Symphony and Minnesota Orchestra are both likely Top 10 nationally, but I think that the fact that Pittsburgh's plays in a beaux arts style palace helps their cause. Can't speak to Minneapolis cultural/theater district, but I'm guessing that Pittsburgh's can more than hold it's own. Cultural District, Pittsburgh - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Also, Pittsburgh does have the Pittsburgh Carnegie Library.

Regional location: I would say that the East Coast helps it significantly, being <6 hours from New York, <5 hours from Toronto, <4 hours from DC and <3 hours from a host of other destinations is good, but also, the spectacular access Pittsburghers have to varied landscapes and nature that are very impressive within an hours drive.

Higher Education: Again, this is one of those Minneapolis is very good, but Pittsburgh just might be better, ones. Pittsburgh I believe has over 100,000 college students within city limits. Carnegie Mellon as a school is likely more esteemed than any in the Minneapolis area, though UM is good, UM and Pitt appear to be relatively comparable, though their standing varies sharply depending on which ranking system is used (ARWU, Forbes, USNWR, etc.) Pittsburgh also has Duquesne which I believe is USNWR Top 100 and a number of somewhat esteemed liberal arts schools in the surrounding communities.

Variety of outdoor opportunities: Again, this is one where admittedly, I don't know as much as I'd like to, and so if more information could be provided about Minny, I may change my tune on. I know that from Pittsburgh which may not be as bike friendly as Minny but still pretty darn good, you can take something called the Great Allegheny Passage, which goes 300 miles through all sorts of towns and series and ends up by the Chesapeake Bay, passing through Washington, DC along the way. For the weekend warrior, I'm not sure that Minny offers something similar. The BWCA, a few hours north of Minny is incredible, but if I had to guess (again I don't know), I'd imagine that the Mississippi River at least has too strong of currents for regular kayaking, on the other hand, business professionals could leave their offices in Pittsburgh, change real quick, and be out on the Monongahela River in a matter of minutes... Pittsburgh also has something an hour to the south called Ohiopyle State Park, where one can rent a raft and float on Class 4 whitewater rapids less than an hour to the south of the city.. It was a favorite daytrip of ours growing up. If Minny does offer something similar, I'm not familiar with it. Also, while I'm sure that Minny offers some nice hiking trails and parks, I may be wrong, but I'd have to guess that unlike CLE or PITT, there are very few if any places near the city where elevation exceeds 1,000 feet. Pittsburgh on the other hand has places like that all around the city, and it has places like Coopers Rock State Forest and Forbes State Forest within an hour that REALLY ARE spectacular.

Neighborhood Feel/Mom&Pops: Admittedly this one is somewhat difficult to assess. However, I'm guessing that Pittsburgh has a much more signficant Ellis Island Culture in it's restaurants and establishments around town than does Minny, which I'd have to imagine has newer, likely more hipster urban areas, but ones that don't have the architectural significance or sense of establishment that say Pittsburgh areas like Carson Street, Lawrenceville and Bloomfield would have (like rowhouses/brownstones etc., although there's not much Minneapolis can do to change that).
This whole post proves that you've never been to Minneapolis, and possibly never Pittsburgh, either. Please kindly withdraw from this debate and leave it to those who actually know BOTH cities...
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Old 07-06-2015, 12:29 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by srsmn View Post
Nightlife: Minneapolis, by a hair. I think that the nightlife in Minneapolis (outside of Hennepin and 1st Avenues) appeals more to my late-20's demographic than the Southside, though (which would be more fun for college kids with fake IDs)
Pittsburgh really is a college age to mid-20s city, whereas Minneapolis is more of a mid-20s to early 30s city.

In one you're mainly hanging out figuring out what you want to do and in the other you're focusing on career (while getting some of that other stuff in).

Good jobs with a reasonable cost of living is mainly what puts Minneapolis over the top. Plus the dating scene doesn't dry up as much as it does in Pittsburgh after a certain age.

But if you can't handle the cold then it's really a moot point.
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Old 07-06-2015, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Northeast Suburbs of PITTSBURGH
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Quote:
Originally Posted by srsmn View Post
Well put.

I, fortunately, have lived in both. Both are great cities. I may be able to make a fair, reasonable comparison:

Nightlife: Minneapolis, by a hair. I think that the nightlife in Minneapolis (outside of Hennepin and 1st Avenues) appeals more to my late-20's demographic than the Southside, though (which would be more fun for college kids with fake IDs)

Culture: This could mean many things. As far as high culture goes....it's a real push. I prefer the MIA to the Carnegie Museum of Art, but I prefer Carnegie's Natural History Museum to anything comparable we have in the Twin Cities (which would include the Minnesota History Museum and Bell Museum, I suppose).

Minneapolis is a leader in live theater, music, stand-up comedy, dance, and I much prefer Minneapolis's offerings of galleries and free art events. Pittsburgh does all of these things well, though, and one could argue it does a few better...

Shopping: Um....neither are really known for it. Shadyside's offering of boutiques and local places beats out Uptown or 50th and France, though, in my opinion. So I guess I'll give it to Pittsburgh?

(side bar: clevelander1991, if you think Carson Street is a major shopping district, or that Minneapolis has nothing like it, then it's obvious you haven't spent much time in either city...)

Dining: Minneapolis. And this one ain't close. But both cities were awful restaurant towns up until 10-20 years ago, and in both, the restaurant scene has really emerged. Minneapolis is just a little further on the trajectory than Pittsburgh is, at this point.

Scenery: Pittsburgh, and it ain't close. (as far as natural scenery goes, anyway. If you want downtown or city-scape: they pretty much tie for skyline, when you talk about it objectively and don't consider that Pittsburgh's hills provide more dramatic vantage points. I prefer Pittsburgh's residential architecture, too-- it's rowhouses, georgian style buildings that I remember in Shadyside, and all of the houses of Squirrel Hill, Point Breeze, etc. Minneapolis isn't bad in this regard, but I do prefer Pittsburgh. Also, as far as parkland goes, while Minneapolis's system is more extensive, it consists mostly of small community parks. Schenley and Highland Parks are in-your-face, stately, early-century, palaces to leisure)

Outdoor Activities: Minneapolis. Pittsburgh's largest parks are gorgeous, but the system is not integrated with trails and bike paths like Minneapolis's is. Also, Pittsburgh has few (if any) urban lakes. I do think Pittsburgh has done a better job overall of utilizing its river(s) for recreational purposes. And I am told you can bike from the Southside all the way to DC! (I don't bike...). I also think that Minneapolis, overall, has better outdoor recreation closer by than Pittsburgh does.If you're really into hills, the North Shore by Duluth is easy to get to and provides similar options for hiking and skiing as Western Pennsylvania. But Ohiopyle doesn't hold a candle to the lakes and state park options near Minneapolis.

Crime: Supposedly Minneapolis's crime rate is higher, overall. But to be honest, they are both very safe cities, and if you avoid certain neighborhoods (the Hill in Pittsburgh, or Jordan in Minneapolis), you will be properly insulated from crime.

Economy: Probably even, when all is said and done. Probably very comparable unemployment rates and job creation. Pittsburgh is a little lower salary on average, but more than cheaper enough to offset the difference. In fact, I was amazed with how easily people were able to buy houses in Pittsburgh, given their ages and incomes.

Weather: Pittsburgh, and it ain't even close. The typical Minneapolis apologist will talk about how we tolerate winters because the summers are "beautiful." Weather-wise, the summers are better in Pittsburgh, there are fewer mosquitoes and the winter's aren't nearly as bad. Pittsburgh actually gets four seasons, too....Minneapolis really doesn't. Unless your seasons are Winter, Thaw, Summer, and pre-Winter blizzard season.

Quality of Life: Um....I think it's probably easier to get ahead in Pittsburgh. Traffic is a little better, from my observation, although Minneapolis isn't bad in that regard. the weather thing certainly impacts quality of life, too.

Higher Education: Pittsburgh. But if you throw St. Paul (Macalester, St. Thomas, St. Kates, Hamline, William Mitchell, Concordia) into the mix, and Northfield (Carleton, St. Olaf), then Minneapolis has a fighting chance. The U is an elite public research institution....and Minneapolis has some other smaller colleges like Augsburg. But Pittsburgh has Pitt, CMU, Chatham, Carlow, Duquesne and Point Park all within city-limits. There may be fewer undergrad and grad students in Pittsburgh total, but they probably make up a higher percentage of the population. And all of the programs in Pittsburgh are comparable or better than in Minneapolis (except maybe Law). So, yeah...Pittsburgh.

Location: Pittsburgh. Minneapolis is too isolated. Pittsburgh is about equidistant from New York and Chicago, with lots of cool cities in between.

So....in my opinion, I guess it's 6-4 Pittsburgh, with a couple of ties?
Very unbiased post and good comparison.

I do have a grip though. Have you ever been to the laurel Highlands? The skiing there is the best in the Eastern US (hold for the Adirondacks and vermont). Nothing within a 10 hour drive of Minneapolis can compare.

I also think if you compare parks in the city or UA level Minneapolis would win. But including Ohiopyle, laurel caverns and Moraine parks it's definitely comparable
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