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View Poll Results: Which city do you think Chicago feels most like on the street level?
NYC 30 33.71%
Philadelphia 20 22.47%
San Francisco 10 11.24%
Washington DC 11 12.36%
Other 18 20.22%
Voters: 89. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-11-2015, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Earth
2,549 posts, read 3,114,352 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anonelitist View Post
^^^Are we supposed to give Chicago brownie points for all the gated/closed off residential high rises it has on its north shore or all the towers sitting on parking pedestals in/near downtown? Come on...weird comment.

We're talking urban level on the street, which has nothing to do with how tall the buildings are and everything to do with how these buildings interact with the street. Some of Chicago's best, most vibrant neighborhoods are those set back from its row of resi skyscrapers on the waterfront.

In San Francisco, I'll take 20 traditional apartment/rowhouse neighborhoods in vibrancy any day over skyscraper dominated Rincon Hill.

For the record, Chicago is miniscule compared to New York when it comes to high rise living. Chicago also still builds massive parking structures and there are plenty of buildings that don't reach the curb. None of this is the case in NYC, which is absolutely on a different level. Don't even pretend otherwise.
However, many people who live in a city would rather live in a highrise than say a row house community. It's all about preference..brownie points have nothing to do with it. It's a fact that some people even in NYC would rather live in a highrise building with better views from say the 60th floor. You may not agree with the residential highrise folks but it's subjective regardless of what you prefer in a city.
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Old 06-12-2015, 02:29 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 6,676,246 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanologist View Post
However, many people who live in a city would rather live in a highrise than say a row house community. It's all about preference..brownie points have nothing to do with it. It's a fact that some people even in NYC would rather live in a highrise building with better views from say the 60th floor. You may not agree with the residential highrise folks but it's subjective regardless of what you prefer in a city.
This is all true, but has zero to do with the thread topic, which is urban level on the street.

Highrises have nothing to do with street level urban feel. If anything, they harm the street level feel in most cities.
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Old 06-12-2015, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 12,570,480 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anonelitist View Post
^^^Are we supposed to give Chicago brownie points for all the gated/closed off residential high rises it has on its north shore or all the towers sitting on parking pedestals in/near downtown? Come on...weird comment.

We're talking urban level on the street, which has nothing to do with how tall the buildings are and everything to do with how these buildings interact with the street. Some of Chicago's best, most vibrant neighborhoods are those set back from its row of resi skyscrapers on the waterfront.

In San Francisco, I'll take 20 traditional apartment/rowhouse neighborhoods in vibrancy any day over skyscraper dominated Rincon Hill.

For the record, Chicago is miniscule compared to New York when it comes to high rise living. Chicago also still builds massive parking structures and there are plenty of buildings that don't reach the curb. None of this is the case in NYC, which is absolutely on a different level. Don't even pretend otherwise.
I think Chicago has a San Francisco-sized area of pretty human-scaled neighborhoods. They aren't quite as tight and human-scaled as some of their SF equivalents, but they are mostly pretty close. I'd say the streets of Chicago feel just about as busy as those in SF. However, the two cities look quite different - makes sense because Chicago is a Midwestern city and SF is a Western city.

I do agree that there is more green space in cities like Chicago, DC, LA, Boston than in a places like NYC, SF and PHI.
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Old 06-12-2015, 04:47 PM
 
Location: So California
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SF feels much more dense and vibrant than Chicago. Chicago feels big and spread out in comparison.
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Old 06-12-2015, 04:55 PM
 
Location: Earth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
This is all true, but has zero to do with the thread topic, which is urban level on the street.

Highrises have nothing to do with street level urban feel. If anything, they harm the street level feel in most cities.
Sure you can still have an active urban street level lined with amenities at the base of a highrise if done right. Chicago does have them. Also don't bother with car garage argument. They can be found in most cities in the country which doesn't make the surrounding environment any less urban. People in cities do have cars. My point is that Chicago is more urban vertical than SF, DC or Philly along with an active street level. You actually have the best of both worlds in this case. Having an active urban street level isn't just restricted to a neighborhood with only 2-3 story buildings.
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Old 06-12-2015, 05:06 PM
 
Location: So California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanologist View Post
Sure you can still have an active urban street level lined with amenities at the base of a highrise if done right. Chicago does have them. Also don't bother with car garage argument. They can be found in most cities in the country which doesn't make the surrounding environment any less urban. People in cities do have cars. My point is that Chicago is more urban vertical than SF, DC or Philly along with an active street level. You actually have the best of both worlds in this case. Having an active urban street level isn't just restricted to a neighborhood with only 2-3 story buildings.

FYI - San Francisco has the best of both worlds as well.
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Old 06-12-2015, 05:52 PM
 
Location: Earth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slo1318 View Post
FYI - San Francisco has the best of both worlds as well.
Yes, in which it has more row homes with less highrise options where as Chicago has the opposite. I prefer highrises so a city like Chicago would suit my options much better. The highrise choices in SF is more limited compared to Chicago.
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Old 06-13-2015, 10:49 AM
 
9,701 posts, read 6,676,246 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanologist View Post
Sure you can still have an active urban street level lined with amenities at the base of a highrise if done right. Chicago does have them.
But the best street-level neighborhoods in Chicago are lowrise, which makes sense, as highrises tend to deaden blocks.
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanologist View Post
Also don't bother with car garage argument. They can be found in most cities in the country which doesn't make the surrounding environment any less urban.
Obviously this is completely untrue. Cities that have highrises with giant parking garages at the base tend to have worse street-level environments. You even see it in Chicago, which is one of the most urban U.S. cities.

Saying that it makes no difference, and therefore Oklahoma City has the same street-level urban environment as Rome, is complete nonsense.

Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanologist View Post
People in cities do have cars. My point is that Chicago is more urban vertical than SF, DC or Philly along with an active street level.
Actually, no, in most major cities around the world, people don't have cars, for the most part.

And we are not talking about "urban vertical". It has zero to do with the thread. We are only talking about street level vibrancy in this thread, nothing else. And cars do have a (negative) impact on street-level feel, no question. Street level garages kill urbanity.
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Old 06-13-2015, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Prince George's County, Maryland
6,212 posts, read 7,037,521 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nola101 View Post
but the best street-level neighborhoods in chicago are lowrise, which makes sense, as highrises tend to deaden blocks.

Obviously this is completely untrue. Cities that have highrises with giant parking garages at the base tend to have worse street-level environments. You even see it in chicago, which is one of the most urban u.s. Cities.

Saying that it makes no difference, and therefore oklahoma city has the same street-level urban environment as rome, is complete nonsense.


Actually, no, in most major cities around the world, people don't have cars, for the most part.

And we are not talking about "urban vertical". It has zero to do with the thread. We are only talking about street level vibrancy in this thread, nothing else. And cars do have a (negative) impact on street-level feel, no question. Street level garages kill urbanity.
+2
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Old 06-13-2015, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
5,256 posts, read 12,565,187 times
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I would say Milwaukee.
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