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Old 06-09-2015, 11:28 PM
 
Location: DC
2,037 posts, read 2,143,381 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
Then, I'm curious what all those people living in huge million dollar+ houses in much of Howard County do for a living.
They work in DC, Howard really should be considered part of the DC metro area, not the Baltimore one.
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Old 06-10-2015, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
682 posts, read 683,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DistrictSonic View Post
They work in DC, Howard really should be considered part of the DC metro area, not the Baltimore one.
About 101,370 federal employees in Maryland commute to Washington, according to 2010 estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau. And around 17,465 of them live in Baltimore and the surrounding counties exclusive of DC Metro area.

Here are Commuting Patterns of Maryland Residents and Workers by Workforce Region for Howard and Carroll Counties referred as "Mid-Maryland" in this Mid-Maryland WIA Report. It has commuting patterns for every MD county and include commuting patterns to/from DC and the MD counties of DC Metro. Data used to develop the Labor and Commuter Shed reports was sourced from the U.S. Census Bureau LEHD Origin-Destination Employment statistics (LODES) database, and extracted through the Census Bureau's OnTheMap (OTM) application
Updated June 4, 2015



What I get from the data is that a good number of people that live in Howard and Carroll counties work in their respective counties while a good majority of them work in the Baltimore Metro Baltimore County, Baltimore City, including Howard and Carroll counties. While the DC Metro county of Montgomery employ more "mid-Maryland" residents there then the district itself.

Last edited by Northernest Southernest C; 06-10-2015 at 02:11 PM..
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Old 06-12-2015, 09:37 PM
 
1,207 posts, read 911,365 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DistrictSonic View Post
Baltimore's MSA includes places which for all intensive purposes include DC suburbs. Case in point, Howard County. There is a bit of a halo effect in the southern suburban communities, as a result of DC, where in shares suburbs. So it is more or less an illusion. Baltimore itself is not that great.
DC-centric folks get so upset when anything about the Baltimore area isn't as bad as they would like it to be. Sure Baltimore area incomes would be a little lower if you didn't include Howard County. But the truth is that, except for Baltimore City, the whole metro area is quite prosperous when compare with US averages. Even in Baltimore City, the younger population is far more prosperous and well educated than older people there.
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Old 06-12-2015, 09:39 PM
 
Location: Nashville TN
4,925 posts, read 4,605,046 times
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How the hell do you live in NYC and the Bay Area on less than 60k a year after federal, state and city tax you are left with next to nothing to live on.
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Old 06-13-2015, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,505 posts, read 2,741,877 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UKWildcat1981 View Post
How the hell do you live in NYC and the Bay Area on less than 60k a year after federal, state and city tax you are left with next to nothing to live on.
Roommates, tv dinners/pizza/street food and public transportation. Lol there are "poor" people who live on less than $20k and get by decently in these cities. The "expectations" of people on City Data never cease to amaze me. If you're single, $60k is more than enough in even NYC and the Bay. People truly don't know how to manage money these days. Smh at people trying to live that Sex and the City/Entourage life in these cities. FREE bars/block parties, FREE Meetups, FREE parks. Throw that in with pregaming before bars, cheap Netflix, and cheap cell service, and everything a young person needs can be done cheaply, and fun, in these cities. Lol at people thinking living in high ceiling lofts, eating out everyday at trendy restaurants and paying $50 for drinks each night is normal city life. Suckers...
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Old 06-13-2015, 10:08 AM
 
1,132 posts, read 1,774,686 times
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Baltimore is a little over-hated. The issue is with both unemployment and crime. Baltimore has plenty of good jobs if you can get one and have the qualifications.
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Old 08-18-2016, 11:45 AM
 
1,207 posts, read 911,365 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
It's an MSA wide thing, Maryland is the wealthiest median income state one the U.S. So actually makes a lot of sense outside of the 630,000 people in Baltimore City proper.
Per Capita incomes in Baltimore City are 13% below the national average - low but nowhere near the lowest. Since the City is only 22% of the MSA's population, somewhat low incomes there don't drag down the median all that much.

Also, Baltimore City's Millennials are surprising well educated, even when compared with slightly older Baltimoreians. I wouldn't be surprised to find out that even Baltimore City's Millennials are have above average median incomes.

Finally, Harford and Carroll Counties, which aren't all that close to Washington DC, have incomes near the state average and are therefore pretty prosperous. Baltimore County (which doesn't include Baltimore City) has incomes only a little below the state average and way above the national average.
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Old 08-18-2016, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Texas
2,723 posts, read 1,321,418 times
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It seems like dollar for dollar, adjusted the cost of living that Minneapolis/St.Paul and Hartford come out ahead as metropolitan areas.

I would venture to guess that Des Moines would also be very good in this category also as it has similarities to Hartford.

I am shocked to see Salt Lake City is so low. But there are many, many young adults that are university aged in the area. Salt Lake City always to me has seemed like it had many well-off younger people. Perhaps if they were to compare 30-35 year old's as opposed to 20-25 year old's it would come off much better in the area.

It seems like places like Herriman, South Jordan and Draper in Salt Lake County are filled with 30 year old's who own large houses and luxury European cars.

I am not surprised with Denver being higher then a majority of major cities. The city has many, many people in their 20s and 30s who move here for employment purposes from all over. I am constantly shocked at the rental budgets of many of these new people from other areas.

If one adjusts to apartment rents though, other western metropolitan areas like Las Vegas and Phoenix are about on the same level.
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Old 08-18-2016, 04:55 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,252 posts, read 5,561,355 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pwduvall View Post
Per Capita incomes in Baltimore City are 13% below the national average - low but nowhere near the lowest. Since the City is only 22% of the MSA's population, somewhat low incomes there don't drag down the median all that much.

Also, Baltimore City's Millennials are surprising well educated, even when compared with slightly older Baltimoreians. I wouldn't be surprised to find out that even Baltimore City's Millennials are have above average median incomes.

Finally, Harford and Carroll Counties, which aren't all that close to Washington DC, have incomes near the state average and are therefore pretty prosperous. Baltimore County (which doesn't include Baltimore City) has incomes only a little below the state average and way above the national average.
Meaning that Baltimore is doing pretty damn good on its own. Baltimore is also one of the fastest growing cities in the country for millennials.
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Old 08-18-2016, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
21,081 posts, read 15,376,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pwduvall View Post
Per Capita incomes in Baltimore City are 13% below the national average - low but nowhere near the lowest. Since the City is only 22% of the MSA's population, somewhat low incomes there don't drag down the median all that much.

Also, Baltimore City's Millennials are surprising well educated, even when compared with slightly older Baltimoreians. I wouldn't be surprised to find out that even Baltimore City's Millennials are have above average median incomes.

Finally, Harford and Carroll Counties, which aren't all that close to Washington DC, have incomes near the state average and are therefore pretty prosperous. Baltimore County (which doesn't include Baltimore City) has incomes only a little below the state average and way above the national average.
Isn't Baltimore in a rich state governed by rich, liberal Democrats?
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