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Old 08-25-2015, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Silver Hill, Albuquerque
765 posts, read 717,889 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elkotronics View Post
True - Albuquerque is not much like Tucson or Phoenix at all. I like both states for their differences, though. Both offer a warm climate, lots of sand and fairly friendly people. Perhaps a bit more so the people of New Mexico are friendly.
As an Albuquerque native who spent the better part of a decade in Tucson, I disagree: the two cities have a lot in common starting with their similar size. For one thing, they have a similar mix of cultures and similar arts/entertainment scene, though Tucson is a little more segregated than Albuquerque and probably has a more pronounced "college town" vibe. There are plenty of differences, though.
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Old 08-25-2015, 11:54 AM
 
Location: New Mexico via Ohio via Indiana
1,418 posts, read 1,178,923 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cactus Hibs View Post
As an Albuquerque native who spent the better part of a decade in Tucson, I disagree: the two cities have a lot in common starting with their similar size. For one thing, they have a similar mix of cultures and similar arts/entertainment scene, though Tucson is a little more segregated than Albuquerque and probably has a more pronounced "college town" vibe. There are plenty of differences, though.
I stand corrected, they are probably the most comparable Southwestern towns. Size, flagship college, NE Heights/Foothills, etc.
But lots of differences also. But good points.
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Old 08-26-2015, 09:48 PM
 
4,554 posts, read 2,021,418 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smarino View Post
Take it from me,Texas is Texas. It's not a Southern state, nor is it a Southwestern state. It's the West. I've lived in several cities in Texas, and others I have talked to that have lived there say the same thing. We're talking politics and culture here, not necessarily ethnicity, and certainly not history. I'm talking about what its like today.

Arizona, where I have also lived, is far too conservative, right wing and Anglo for me to ever, ever consider it a Southwestern state as well. It just doesn't have that feeling.

New Mexico and Colorado are Southwestern states, and in my mind New Mexico is the epitome of what the Southwest is about. There really is no sense in describing why, because it isn't a verbal thing. Go there and live, and you will know exactly what I'm talking about. Of course, it depends on where you're talking about in New Mexico too. Las Cruces, where we lived for four years before moving here to Florida (which is NOT a Southern state by any stretch of the term), didn't have that Southwest feeling, but that may be because I lived in Albuquerque for so long before we moved to LC. It could also be because LC is so close to Mexico. There is almost no Native American culture or peoples in LC., just as there are very few similarities between Albuq and LC, especially the food. We considered the food in LC to be peasant Mexican food, w/ lots of lard in the beans, lots of cheese slathered on the burritos, etc. The food in Albuq was some of the best food I ever ate in my life outside of New Orleans, and I miss it a lot. If not for the crime and the cold winters, it would be someplace I might like to return to. When we left LC, we were done w/ it.

I'm in Las Cruces, and while much of what you say in comparing it to ABQ is true, ABQ can't beat LC for layback, peaceful living. We are a small town comparatively speaking, so that goes with the territory. I LOVE both ABQ and LC, but the southern part of the state has its own charms. We do have White Sands...and the Organ Mountains are just as lovely as the Sandias. What I do miss in LC is the presence of the Native American influence, just as you mentioned. When I first moved here over 40 years ago, we did have a greater presence, mostly at NM State University, but lots of children in our schools. Now hardly any. That is the thing I love most about ABQ - When you are in ABQ you KNOW you are in New Mexico. That's one of the reasons why I love the university there. Closest thing we have to that 'feeling' here in LC is Old Mesilla. That also is the spirit of NM. Yes, I've had great food in ABQ, but in LC, you have to know where to go... and NOT go! Plus, most Las Crucens don't eat out so much, because (especially) the old families here cook our southwestern food better than any restaurant could EVER do! You're right. The essence of NM is something that is felt, not verbalized. I don't know how you could choose FLA over NM! To me the thing about NM is- LC, ABQ or Santa Fe- I feel a part of them all no matter how long it's been since I've traveled up north. And everything in between is just as golden. There is so much diversity in the land, people, culture ...NM is quite singular.
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Old 08-26-2015, 09:51 PM
 
4,554 posts, read 2,021,418 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cactus Hibs View Post
As an Albuquerque native who spent the better part of a decade in Tucson, I disagree: the two cities have a lot in common starting with their similar size. For one thing, they have a similar mix of cultures and similar arts/entertainment scene, though Tucson is a little more segregated than Albuquerque and probably has a more pronounced "college town" vibe. There are plenty of differences, though.

Agree!
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Old 08-27-2015, 05:55 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
5,583 posts, read 5,511,398 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tangelag View Post
Agree!
I agree also.
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Old 08-27-2015, 07:01 PM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
24,130 posts, read 38,859,608 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pacifico View Post
Ive always thought Arizona and New Mexico were true southwest states.

but then again Albuquerque seems to have lots in common with both Phoenix and San Antonio.

Any opinions or insights?
I do not agree with: "Albuquerque seems to have lots in common with both Phoenix and San Antonio." But my opinion and experiences would be different than yours.

We have a forum called City vs. City for such comparisons, for example:
Albuquerque or Tucson?!
Albuquerque compared to Phoenix
Albuquerque or Phoenix
Albuquerque versus Tucson.
Albuquerque or Tucson 10 year outlook
Tucson vs. Albuquerque
Which is more urban, with more of a "big city" feel: Albuquerque or Phoenix?
Albuquerque, NM vs. San Antonio, TX
San Antonio or Albuquerque?
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Old 08-30-2015, 02:07 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
631 posts, read 2,104,887 times
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Texas is hot, humid and cold.

New Mexico has a nice variety of weather depending on where you are in the state and it a dryer climate and Arizona is probably the same way.
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Old 09-12-2015, 11:39 PM
 
2,198 posts, read 1,227,272 times
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Having lived in both Az (White Mountains) and NM (Northwestern part of the state), I see those two states as being very different. In addition to where I lived, I had a brother in Albuquerque, a brother-in-law in Las Cruces, and another brother-in-law (and some friends) in Sante Fe. I also had relatives in Tucson and Phoenix areas, and spent significant time in Flagstaff. I have only driven through Texas. I do know some people from Texas, and they are their own thing. I wouldn't compare Texas in general to either AZ or NM, but I will say there are places in Eastern NM that feel more like a mix to me.

I don't feel like New Mexico and Arizona are all that alike, with the exception of weather in similar latitudes/regions and the areas on the Navajo Rez. I lived very close to the Navajo Rez in NM and close to one of the Apache Rez in Arizona. But the communities felt very different, the food was different, and the overall feel was different. I agree that NM is its own place, and I think it's one of a kind. It has a very special place in my heart. And I really, really miss stuffed sopapillas smothered in green chile
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Old 09-24-2015, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
1,335 posts, read 797,433 times
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I think altitude and climate probably serve as better dividers than the state lines. Arizona, New Mexico and Texas each has such tremendous topographical and climate differences within each state, that it's easy to find places even within each state that seem like they're from different worlds.

I guess I do feel kinship to New Mexico, but that is mostly because I have always had family in NM and have spent a lot of time there. I live near Phoenix and I agree it doesn't really have an analog anywhere in NM. A lot of people who live here do love to complain about snowbirds and people moving in from other states and changing/compromising the culture/politics/whatever, which I assume could be an issue in parts of NM as well, e.g. Santa Fe. I think NM by virtue of its smaller population and the fact that much more of the population was born there -- and indeed may have roots going back 400 years -- has a more defined sense of place and culture than many places in America.
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Old 09-24-2015, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Silver Hill, Albuquerque
765 posts, read 717,889 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottsdaleMark View Post
I think altitude and climate probably serve as better dividers than the state lines. Arizona, New Mexico and Texas each has such tremendous topographical and climate differences within each state, that it's easy to find places even within each state that seem like they're from different worlds.

I guess I do feel kinship to New Mexico, but that is mostly because I have always had family in NM and have spent a lot of time there. I live near Phoenix and I agree it doesn't really have an analog anywhere in NM. A lot of people who live here do love to complain about snowbirds and people moving in from other states and changing/compromising the culture/politics/whatever, which I assume could be an issue in parts of NM as well, e.g. Santa Fe. I think NM by virtue of its smaller population and the fact that much more of the population was born there -- and indeed may have roots going back 400 years -- has a more defined sense of place and culture than many places in America.
400 years? Try 4,000+...I think the continued presence of a large Native American population in New Mexico has had and continues to have a major influence on its culture. You get that a little bit in Arizona (especially in Flagstaff and the NE), but I agree, the much larger population (and much larger population born elsewhere in the US) dilutes it to a fair extent.
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