U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-19-2015, 01:17 PM
 
Location: New York NY
4,133 posts, read 5,940,379 times
Reputation: 8670

Advertisements

NYC has quite a few streets that are iconic/well-known outside the area -- and Houston street is NOT one them! (I've never met or heard of anyone who comes to the city and says that Houston street is on their must-see list.) The streets that are "brands" almost everywhere:

Broadway -- always means theater and entertainment
42nd St -- (see above)
Wall St -- shorthand for high finance, though most of Wall St is now apartments
Madison Ave --shorthand for the ad business, though that's mostly moved on now
7th Ave -- shorthand for the fashion biz
Park Ave -- means old-money wealth and elegance
Fifth Ave -- also old-money, but also high-end shopping like Sak's and Tiffany's
125th St --means Harlem, center of Black American culture

I think these are all widely know outside of NYC, but ther may be a few others I can't think of off the top of my head
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-19-2015, 02:22 PM
 
1,564 posts, read 1,008,221 times
Reputation: 496
Vegas has the Strip of course,
Miami has South Beach
N.y has Broadway, 42nd st ,Times Square area, 5th ave,
L.A has Hollywood blvd, Sunset Blvd, Rodeo drive in Beverly Hills,
Wilshire of course, Broadway in DTLA, Crenshaw is like the Center of Black culture on the Westcoast.
Cant forget Mulholland Drive & Melrose.
Atlanta has Peachtree & Dogwood
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-19-2015, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Seattle aka tier 3 city :)
1,078 posts, read 893,983 times
Reputation: 667
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonelitist View Post
SF is definitely a city with very very well known neighborhoods as opposed to streets. The Haight actually refers more to the neighborhood than the street that runs through it. Same goes for the Fillmore. Or the Mission. Or the Castro (Castro St was another one not mentioned, as well as Mission, but people know those names as neighborhoods, not streets). Duboce Triangle has Duboce Ave. Pacific Heights has Pacific Ave. I really can't think of another city besides New York that has so many really famous neighborhoods. But the city isn't a city of streets so much. Even Union Square consists of multiple streets. When the real estate brokerages compile lists of most expensive retail streets or office streets, I feel like they very clearly have a hard time picking a street in San Francisco and sometimes even just include whole submarket name (like Union Square, for retail, as opposed to say Stockton St or Grant or Sutter).
I would have to disagree on this wholeheartedly, South Central, Venice, East LA, West Hollywood, the valley, west LA, and Hollywood have no rivals outside of New York. Not to mention famous burbs such as Pasadena, Beverly Hills, Santa Monica, Inglewood, Compton, Long Beach, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-19-2015, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Miss Jankins (Say nothing bad).
1,232 posts, read 1,355,028 times
Reputation: 1500
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonelitist View Post
I think Peachtree is quite well known. People in and out of Atlanta know it as a running joke that there are so many Peachtrees (because there are). All in good fun. As Atlanta continues to grow and become more prominent and as Peachtree itself develops, it will only become more and more well known.
I live in Atlanta. I've been on Peachtree Street. I've heard the joke. I've been confused about the many Peachtree Streets. I've been on a few of the streets mentioned in this thread. Therefore, I especially don't get the vibrant part.

If Cwkimbro, Mutiny, and a few others say that it is iconic/ famous/ vibrant, I'll buy it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-19-2015, 02:44 PM
 
279 posts, read 259,983 times
Reputation: 681
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThreeSides View Post
I live in Atlanta. I've been on Peachtree Street. I've heard the joke. I've been confused about the many Peachtree Streets. I've been on a few of the streets mentioned in this thread. Therefore, I especially don't get the vibrant part.

If Cwkimbro, Mutiny, and a few others say that it is iconic/ famous/ vibrant, I'll buy it.
Peachtree is certainly famous, and it certainly is iconic for Atlanta, but I would never by any stretch of imagination call it vibrant
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-19-2015, 03:07 PM
 
1,353 posts, read 1,135,440 times
Reputation: 790
^^^Threesides wants a current resident of Atlanta to say that Peachtree is iconic/famous, not someone who doesn't live in Atlanta but still knows Peachtree and thinks it's iconic/famous. (lol)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-19-2015, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,504 posts, read 2,727,471 times
Reputation: 2688
Quote:
Originally Posted by citylove101 View Post
NYC has quite a few streets that are iconic/well-known outside the area -- and Houston street is NOT one them! (I've never met or heard of anyone who comes to the city and says that Houston street is on their must-see list.) The streets that are "brands" almost everywhere:

Broadway -- always means theater and entertainment
42nd St -- (see above)
Wall St -- shorthand for high finance, though most of Wall St is now apartments
Madison Ave --shorthand for the ad business, though that's mostly moved on now
7th Ave -- shorthand for the fashion biz
Park Ave -- means old-money wealth and elegance
Fifth Ave -- also old-money, but also high-end shopping like Sak's and Tiffany's
125th St --means Harlem, center of Black American culture

I think these are all widely know outside of NYC, but ther may be a few others I can't think of off the top of my head
Yea, Houston isn't a particularly famous/iconic street at all. I'd argue there are outerborough streets more "famous" than Houston (Queens Blvd, Flatbush Avenue, Grand Concourse for starters) and even none of these are particularly famous outside of the metro. Pretty much all major NYC thoroughfares are vibrant, and the above are even more vibrant than Houston. Not seeing Houston St as a factor at all.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-19-2015, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Springfield, Ohio
11,784 posts, read 9,705,627 times
Reputation: 10783
I would include Woodward Avenue in Detriot on any Top 10 "iconic" list, even if it's nothing like it used to be.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-19-2015, 03:44 PM
 
1,353 posts, read 1,135,440 times
Reputation: 790
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calisonn View Post
I would have to disagree on this wholeheartedly, South Central, Venice, East LA, West Hollywood, the valley, west LA, and Hollywood have no rivals outside of New York. Not to mention famous burbs such as Pasadena, Beverly Hills, Santa Monica, Inglewood, Compton, Long Beach, etc.
Yea, I'll give you that. But then I'd easily put SF and Bay Area at 3rd. I can't think of another city or metro with as many really well known neighborhoods/burbs. Perhaps Chicago, but less so today in 2015 than say the 1980s or before. Maybe South FL.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-19-2015, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 12,561,310 times
Reputation: 3941
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonelitist View Post
Yea, I'll give you that. But then I'd easily put SF and Bay Area at 3rd. I can't think of another city or metro with as many really well known neighborhoods/burbs. Perhaps Chicago, but less so today in 2015 than say the 1980s or before. Maybe South FL.
As weird as this may sound New Orleans might be up there too. French Quarter, Garden District, Lower Ninth Ward, Gentilly.

In Chicago all I can think of is The Loop, Boystown, Wrigleyville, Magnificent Mile - maybe Lincoln Park and Hyde Park. Obviously I am a city nerd so I can name probably 2 dozen Chicago neighborhoods but this is what I think most people would know.

San Francisco / Bay area is hard because it has a lot of well known suburbs/satellite cities like Oakland, San Jose/Silicon Valley, and Palo Alto. Within San Francisco there is The Haight, Chinatown, Fisherman's Wharf, The Mission, The Presidio, Telegraph Hill, Tenderloin, and maybe SOMA and maybe The Castro.

I'd say that is good enough for a second-place finish. Los Angeles easily has the most well-known suburbs/satellite cities and NYC easily has the most in-city neighborhoods that are well known.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top