U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-23-2015, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Earth
2,549 posts, read 3,112,295 times
Reputation: 1198

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Though I'll add Midtown was developed relatively late, maybe 1860s. I don't think age affects much how much the shop concentration is.



I'd guess Wriggleyville might compare somewhat well with an outer borough neighborhood, though still less dense. Haven't been Wriggleyville; have been to Wicker Park.



I think they're only similar in the city centers. Outside Chicago isn't that similar to NYC. In some ways by scale and archecture, the closest Northeastern city to Chicago residential neighborhoods is Boston lots of two and three family buildings, and both have a lot of wooden buildings. Densities are fairly similar except in the Chicago high rise neighborhoods by the lake, and Boston has a bunch of with 5 story ish apartment block surrounding downtown which nearly the same density. Chicago's gridded and goes on for much longer than Boston of course.
Chicago also has more residential highrises than both Boston and Philly combined. When it comes to vertical urban living (highrise residents/skyscraper office workers) Chicago easily beats any area of the Northeast outside NYC.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-23-2015, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,205 posts, read 8,352,813 times
Reputation: 4622
Quote:
Originally Posted by PerseusVeil View Post
I agree that quite a lot of the Loop is, first and foremost, Chicago's CBD. Even with the increased number of residents over previous decades, a lot of the Loop outside of Michigan Ave by the parks and the Art Institute, the shopping on State Street, etc, is dead outside of standard of business hours. If you want a lively part of downtown, a neighborhood like River North is where someone is better off.

That being said, I'm not getting the idea that Wrigleyville is "edgy." Parts of the Clark strip certainly need some TLC, which makes me get the rustic comment, but I didn't ever think I'd here edgy and Wrigleyville used in the same sentence. Could you two elaborate what you mean by that?
By edgy I merely meant cool and hip. It's kind of known as a party district, especially amongst Cubs fans. The general populace seems to be younger as well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2015, 09:28 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 6,666,855 times
Reputation: 9775
Wrigleyville is the polar opposite of edgy. It's a neighborhood centered around a baseball stadium, and filled with suburbanites and frat-boy types. It most definitely isn't "cool and hip", unless you think sports bars and fast food are "cool and hip".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2015, 09:45 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,205 posts, read 8,352,813 times
Reputation: 4622
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Wrigleyville is the polar opposite of edgy. It's a neighborhood centered around a baseball stadium, and filled with suburbanites and frat-boy types. It most definitely isn't "cool and hip", unless you think sports bars and fast food are "cool and hip".
Your definition and my definition of "edgy" differ. And it is "cool" and "hip" from what I've seen, and there's a lot more to it than fast food joints, which I don't remember seeing any of, and sports bars. You can't argue semantics on what's cool and what's not, so please don't even try.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2015, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Chicago
2,357 posts, read 2,009,806 times
Reputation: 2181
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
By edgy I merely meant cool and hip. It's kind of known as a party district, especially amongst Cubs fans. The general populace seems to be younger as well.
It's popular, but not edgy by any means. Lots of frat bros and sorority basics.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Wrigleyville is the polar opposite of edgy. It's a neighborhood centered around a baseball stadium, and filled with suburbanites and frat-boy types. It most definitely isn't "cool and hip", unless you think sports bars and fast food are "cool and hip".
Its bars are full of college students and recent grads/transplants every weekend. The suburbanites only make it more congested, but they aren't the crowd that's filling the bars every weekend.

I can only stand a few of the bars there at this point, but its overall popularity can't be questioned. I agree that it's not edgy though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2015, 01:52 AM
 
Location: CA, NC, and currently FL
366 posts, read 273,806 times
Reputation: 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Shops seemed to be a bit more generic / chains. Food places seemed to be either be chains or sit-down restaurants, though I could have missed something.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
From my time spent in Chicago I do have to agree there are an awful lot of chain stores and restaurants, there's a good mix of local and regional places as well.
Wait I'm confused, what's actually being considered to be more chain dominated here, Midtown or Loop? Or are you guys talking of just Chicago and New York in general?

Also, are you actually considering size difference here?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2015, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,205 posts, read 8,352,813 times
Reputation: 4622
Quote:
Originally Posted by KaneKane View Post
Wait I'm confused, what's actually being considered to be more chain dominated here, Midtown or Loop? Or are you guys talking of just Chicago and New York in general?

Also, are you actually considering size difference here?
Well the size difference is obvious, but it doesn't really affect what the main question is, how are the two cities visually different at ground level.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2015, 09:44 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
45,740 posts, read 39,610,543 times
Reputation: 14671
Quote:
Originally Posted by KaneKane View Post
Wait I'm confused, what's actually being considered to be more chain dominated here, Midtown or Loop? Or are you guys talking of just Chicago and New York in general?
I was considering Midtown with the Loop. Not saying Midtown doesn't have plenty of chains, but there are non-chains [see some of the streetviews I posted]
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2015, 09:50 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
45,740 posts, read 39,610,543 times
Reputation: 14671
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
Well the size difference is obvious, but it doesn't really affect what the main question is, how are the two cities visually different at ground level.
The land area of Chicago is about the same as New York City excluding Staten Island. Obviously that's not what you mean by size, but in one respect the city sizes are similar.

Here's Wriggleville, 5 miles north of the Loop:

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9498...7i13312!8i6656

5 miles north of Times Square

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.8247...7i13312!8i6656

Greenpoint, Brooklyn looks a bit closer (actually closer in distance to Times Square, but longer by road/subway because of the East River):

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.7287...8i6656!6m1!1e1

more packed and a different look
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2015, 09:53 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
45,740 posts, read 39,610,543 times
Reputation: 14671
Another difference, not in Midtown but scattered in other older parts of Manhattan is stone paving:

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.7357...8i6656!6m1!1e1

In a very busy area. Few office skyscrapers but lots of shops. Old cast-iron district:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Gr...9b447def3f2cd0
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top