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Old 08-24-2015, 01:53 PM
 
211 posts, read 316,122 times
Reputation: 242

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Where I grew up a long time ago, Edgewater, around 10 miles or so north of the loop and Devon Ave I would say about 12 miles are so as well. Do the 360.

[SIZE=3][/SIZE]
[SIZE=3]https://www.google.com/maps/@41.992651,-87.6583135,3a,75y,193.91h,89.62t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1steN***jP-azpbE236dREWg!2e0!7i3328!8i1664!6m1!1e1[/SIZE]
[SIZE=3]https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9976...7i13312!8i6656[/SIZE]
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Old 08-24-2015, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Earth
2,549 posts, read 3,115,626 times
Reputation: 1198
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Where are those photos from?

Interesting stuff. I wasn't implying that Chicago didn't have stone paving or that stone paving reflects age. Just as an example it's something Manhattan has while Chicago doesn't (or at least more of it than Chicago the NYC examples weren't in out of the way corners).
Okay, I must have misunderstood you earlier. The two photos I shot are actually in Birmingham, AL's Morris Avenue. The city decided to preserve this area with the stone pavers still intact. It would have been nice if Chicago could have preserved more of the stone paved streets it had that are now covered by asphalt. When you look at Manhattan I find it interesting how it evolved from the lower end of the island as it spread further up before pavers were more common with just dirt filled roads and horses. Kind of reminded of the scenes from the movie Gangs of New York.

What NY looked like back then before skyscrapers.
http://theredlist.com/media/database...theredlist.jpg
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Old 08-26-2015, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
3,238 posts, read 3,481,371 times
Reputation: 2850
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanologist View Post
Okay, I must have misunderstood you earlier. The two photos I shot are actually in Birmingham, AL's Morris Avenue. The city decided to preserve this area with the stone pavers still intact. It would have been nice if Chicago could have preserved more of the stone paved streets it had that are now covered by asphalt. When you look at Manhattan I find it interesting how it evolved from the lower end of the island as it spread further up before pavers were more common with just dirt filled roads and horses. Kind of reminded of the scenes from the movie Gangs of New York.

What NY looked like back then before skyscrapers.
http://theredlist.com/media/database...theredlist.jpg
FYI, Gangs of New York Manhattan street scenes are in no way historically accurate. The first paved Manhattan streets appeared as early as the 1660s, and by the time Gangs of New York takes place (1860s) the majority of lower Manhattan, "the city", had at least paved sidewalks. Pretty much all brick houses had paved sidewalks leading to them, and most of Manhattan was already brick at that point (building wooden houses inside the city was banned in 1815). The last big section of wooden houses in Manhattan burned down in the Great Fire of 1845. There was obviously nothing paved further up since the area around Midtown was rural farmland back then.

Last edited by Gantz; 08-26-2015 at 10:47 AM..
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Old 08-26-2015, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,619 posts, read 24,821,143 times
Reputation: 11185
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
Great visuals. 5 miles north of the Loop and 5 miles north of Times Square actually look surprisingly similar. Obviously Wriggleyville is lower density with shorter buildings, but they look more similar than I'd have guessed.
Isn't that the difference between 145th Street in Harlem and Auburn Avenue in Atlanta? They both have retail fronting the street, it's just that Auburn Avenue is lower density with shorter buildings.
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Old 08-26-2015, 11:14 AM
 
9,701 posts, read 6,681,319 times
Reputation: 9776
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
Great visuals. 5 miles north of the Loop and 5 miles north of Times Square actually look surprisingly similar. Obviously Wriggleyville is lower density with shorter buildings, but they look more similar than I'd have guessed.
They don't really look similar, at all. Wrigleyville is mostly detached buildings with lawns, including a large number of single family home or duplex-type blocks. Five miles north of Times Square will put you in Central Harlem, which basically has no detached buildings or lawns or SFH/duplex type building stock.

And you're basically comparing the densest possible part of Chicago with the least dense possible part of core NYC, though they still aren't similar. Density doesn't radiate outwards equally in any city. You can be one mile from core Chicago and in vacant land, or ten miles from core Chicago and in fairly dense surroundings.

This is one block from Wrigley Field and the typical side street in this part of Lakeview-
https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9500...8i6656!6m1!1e1

This is a typical Harlem block-
https://www.google.com/maps/@40.8248...8i6656!6m1!1e1
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Old 08-26-2015, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,215 posts, read 8,370,173 times
Reputation: 4644
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
They don't really look similar, at all. Wrigleyville is mostly detached buildings with lawns, including a large number of single family home or duplex-type blocks. Five miles north of Times Square will put you in Central Harlem, which basically has no detached buildings or lawns or SFH/duplex type building stock.

And you're basically comparing the densest possible part of Chicago with the least dense possible part of core NYC, though they still aren't similar. Density doesn't radiate outwards equally in any city. You can be one mile from core Chicago and in vacant land, or ten miles from core Chicago and in fairly dense surroundings.

This is one block from Wrigley Field and the typical side street in this part of Lakeview-
https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9500...8i6656!6m1!1e1

This is a typical Harlem block-
https://www.google.com/maps/@40.8248...8i6656!6m1!1e1
No offense but I've tuned off what you say a long time ago. I've found you're always going to disagree with me or anything about Chicago. Now your definition of "cool" is more accurate than mine, I'm turning on my filters and laying you on the ignore list.
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Old 08-26-2015, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,215 posts, read 8,370,173 times
Reputation: 4644
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Isn't that the difference between 145th Street in Harlem and Auburn Avenue in Atlanta? They both have retail fronting the street, it's just that Auburn Avenue is lower density with shorter buildings.
Yep!
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Old 08-26-2015, 02:15 PM
 
Location: East Central Pennsylvania/ Chicago for 6yrs.
2,539 posts, read 2,313,365 times
Reputation: 1483
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
They don't really look similar, at all. Wrigleyville is mostly detached buildings with lawns, including a large number of single family home or duplex-type blocks. Five miles north of Times Square will put you in Central Harlem, which basically has no detached buildings or lawns or SFH/duplex type building stock.

And you're basically comparing the densest possible part of Chicago with the least dense possible part of core NYC, though they still aren't similar. Density doesn't radiate outwards equally in any city. You can be one mile from core Chicago and in vacant land, or ten miles from core Chicago and in fairly dense surroundings.

This is one block from Wrigley Field and the typical side street in this part of Lakeview-
https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9500...8i6656!6m1!1e1

This is a typical Harlem block-
https://www.google.com/maps/@40.8248...8i6656!6m1!1e1
Nola.... we know Chicago has no tenements turned more high-end fashionable because of demand. But you know Lakeview, which includes Wrigleyville is still one is the densest in Chicago.

You showed a street scene where the trees hide the homes.... yes these set-backs from the street with green space in front. Is a standard in Chicago. A GREAT TRAIT I BELIEVE. So I will give a couple... WHERE YOU CAN SEE THE HOUSING

NEAR WRIGLEY FIELD where you can see the houses. DENSITY CHICAGO STYLE... yes old single homes do get mixed in all types NO TENEMENTS.

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9467...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9503...7i13312!8i6656

THEIR BACK ALLYS Something Manhattan has little of.
https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9504...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9461...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9462...7i13312!8i6656

SPARE ME NOLA MANHATTAN STILL TRUMPS ANYTHING CHICAGO HAS... Though you probably will. STILL THERE IS A CHICAGO STYLE VS. NYC. WHY SHOULDN'T THERE BE.
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Old 09-10-2015, 10:30 PM
 
1 posts, read 789 times
Reputation: 13
I lived in Chicago for the past 16 years and then moved to NYC this January so I can give you a first hand assessment of the differences.

I had never visited NYC till a month or so before I moved here. I had been to a lot of the major cities in the country, Houston, Atlanta, DC, Boston etc but everywhere I went, once I saw their downtowns and so called urban/city life, I was always more appreciative of how much bigger the city of Chicago was compared to the other major cities. In short everywhere I went seemed like a small town in regards to city life when I compared it to Chi. You think of downtown to southside to northside to westside and Chi compared to most American cities is just downright massive. So when I thought of NYC I used to picture a place that was comparable to Chicago. A place maybe at most slightly bigger cause in my mind how the hell could a city be that much bigger than this massive city of Chicago with all the buildings etc. Well to cut the long story short, NYC is not a little bit bigger but a whole lot bigger in terms of urban/city build up or life.

In Chicago I have lived all over the city except for the Northside. I lived downtown for 7 years, on Dearborn and Lake st and in the south loop. Let me start off by saying in a lot of replies I see people talking much about Michigan ave as far as foot traffic, this is understandable from the perspective of people that don't live in Chicago or people that live in Illinois but don't live or work downtown. State street for the most part has more foot traffic than most of Michigan ave. When I lived on Dearborn and lake, State st was a block away and state was always more congested with people than most of Michigan ave. Michigan ave is not really congested all except some certain parts, more specifically between a little after Randolph all the way to around Ohio where most of the main shopping, Water tower etc is located. With that said for the most part State street has more foot traffic in general that Michigan. So in general most streets in Manhattan (mid town and downtown) have more foot traffic on an average day than Michigan and avenue if you are looking at Michigan in its entirety as it passes through downtown. Hell they even have more foot traffic than State street on the average day. I am just saying just observing from street view. But remember I said most streets not all streets. Picture it like this, think of Michigan ave during the taste of Chicago, when you have the roads blocked off to cars and you have people walking in the center of the street and so forth. now subtract the people walking in the middle of the road when the streets are blocked off from vehicle traffic, so all you have left is the amount of people walking on the sidewalks during the taste, and thats how everyday life is in Manhattan. And its just normal everyday life in NYC. It might sound overwhelming but it gets normal pretty quickly and you accept it as normal city life.

For this post I will only compare Manhattan to downtown Chi. A lot of what people said in this thread is true as far as bigger side walks in Manhattan as compared to downtown Chicago and narrower streets as well. The avenues in Manhattan are probably bigger as far as number of lanes than downtown Chi.

Walking on the streets of Midtown coming from Chi you will have a different perspective than people visiting NYC from most of the other cities in the country cause you are used to tall buildings, but you will definitely notice that NYC has A WHOLE lot more of them. Downtown Chi you will see a wall of buildings on some streets but others might have tall buildings followed by short ones followed by tall ones and so forth to where its really not a wall of skyscrappers cause they are mixed with shorter buildings. you can count on one hand how many streets downtown Chi really have a true wall of skyscrappers side by side that stretches as far as the eye can see (pay close attention to this and you will see what I mean). Thats not the case in midtown Manhattan, it literally seems like every street has a wall of skyscrapers and you look down the street and you can't even see where the wall ends. And the buildings in NYC are built bigger as in girth.

Chi has tall buildings but the sheer size and number of NYC's buildings has a marked "holy sh**" feeling to it. Walking down the streets of Manhattan, whatever part you are in, there is just this energy the city has, others keeping using the phrase "I can't really explain it" and I will have to agree with that, there is something about the vibe of NYC that is unique and very addictive. Chi or any other city I have been to does not have that energy and you can notice it walking down the streets.

There are what seems like an unlimited amount of subways in NYC, in Manhattan in particular there seems to be a subway almost everywhere, that is not the case in Chi. While there are subways in Chi (red and blue line), they are not nearly as numerous, not even remotely close. The train cars are a lot more spacious in NYC and the subways are much bigger. Just about every subway in Chi has 2 tracks one in each direction, in Manhattan you will find subways with four or even 5 tracks, picture the brown or the purple line around belmont the amount of tracks there but picture that in a subway. Also in NYC you see multi level subways as in subways below subways.

Everything is just more. Another marked difference in NYC compared to Chi is commerce. In Chi downtown its mostly chain type stores.. popular brands etc. NYC has tons of stores that are just small business kind of stores that are not name brand. Obviously the popular name brand stores are here as well, in large numbers but there are large numbers of the so called "no name" kind of stores too. they are everywhere and its mind blowing how much commerce NYC has.

Lets just put it like this Chi downtown seems like a big city that was built with a ruler and all the tools used to make sure it is properly structured and everything is in place in the right proportion and everything fits where it is supposed to fit so it can be symmetrically a masterpiece in terms of aesthetic organization and will make an observer be wowed at how such a big city could be so well thought up and molded into this. NYC on the other hand seems like a place that just grew to the size it is not because of trying to fit any scheme but just cause things just kept being pilled on top of each other till this ginormous thing came out of it. Don't get me wrong NYC is a beautiful city but it just doesn't seem like it grew under the restrictions Chi grew under.

Lastly you will also notice a difference in how people dress in general. I think people in both cities dress well but you will notice that there is probably more of an individualistic creativity to the way people dress in NYC compared to Chi. In Chicago typically people dress alike sort of.. If there is a certain style that is nice and acceptable, most people in Chi just have variations of the same style, but in NYC its more individualistic. I'm not going to say any is better cause things like fashion and how beautiful people look are things of personal opinion so thats not my place to judge, but I do notice a difference in regards to dressing as a whole. Maybe its cause in Chi the only melting pot of the City is downtown and other than that is segregated by ethnic groups for most of the city. most of the people that are downtown everyday don't live there and at the end of the day everybody goes back to their own part of town which is mostly populated by people of the same ethnic group, and they end up acting, alike dressing alike etc cause of the lack of variation. So when people of each ethnic group come downtown you end up being able to identify each ethnic group by their style of dressing cause its whats common in their segregated part of town... Anyway its another aspect that is different in NYC. Also I think people in NYC are somewhat nicer than people in Chi. In Chicago a lot of people are on edge and constantly seem like they have to prove that they are tough or not push overs, and I don't get that vibe in NYC, people don't seem as edgy.

Thats my 2 cents, I won't go into the other boroughs cause thats a whole other twist but I hope this helps.
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Old 09-11-2015, 12:00 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,504 posts, read 2,733,861 times
Reputation: 2688
Quote:
Originally Posted by silverbackape15 View Post
I lived in Chicago for the past 16 years and then moved to NYC this January so I can give you a first hand assessment of the differences.

I had never visited NYC till a month or so before I moved here. I had been to a lot of the major cities in the country, Houston, Atlanta, DC, Boston etc but everywhere I went, once I saw their downtowns and so called urban/city life, I was always more appreciative of how much bigger the city of Chicago was compared to the other major cities. In short everywhere I went seemed like a small town in regards to city life when I compared it to Chi. You think of downtown to southside to northside to westside and Chi compared to most American cities is just downright massive. So when I thought of NYC I used to picture a place that was comparable to Chicago. A place maybe at most slightly bigger cause in my mind how the hell could a city be that much bigger than this massive city of Chicago with all the buildings etc. Well to cut the long story short, NYC is not a little bit bigger but a whole lot bigger in terms of urban/city build up or life.

In Chicago I have lived all over the city except for the Northside. I lived downtown for 7 years, on Dearborn and Lake st and in the south loop. Let me start off by saying in a lot of replies I see people talking much about Michigan ave as far as foot traffic, this is understandable from the perspective of people that don't live in Chicago or people that live in Illinois but don't live or work downtown. State street for the most part has more foot traffic than most of Michigan ave. When I lived on Dearborn and lake, State st was a block away and state was always more congested with people than most of Michigan ave. Michigan ave is not really congested all except some certain parts, more specifically between a little after Randolph all the way to around Ohio where most of the main shopping, Water tower etc is located. With that said for the most part State street has more foot traffic in general that Michigan. So in general most streets in Manhattan (mid town and downtown) have more foot traffic on an average day than Michigan and avenue if you are looking at Michigan in its entirety as it passes through downtown. Hell they even have more foot traffic than State street on the average day. I am just saying just observing from street view. But remember I said most streets not all streets. Picture it like this, think of Michigan ave during the taste of Chicago, when you have the roads blocked off to cars and you have people walking in the center of the street and so forth. now subtract the people walking in the middle of the road when the streets are blocked off from vehicle traffic, so all you have left is the amount of people walking on the sidewalks during the taste, and thats how everyday life is in Manhattan. And its just normal everyday life in NYC. It might sound overwhelming but it gets normal pretty quickly and you accept it as normal city life.

For this post I will only compare Manhattan to downtown Chi. A lot of what people said in this thread is true as far as bigger side walks in Manhattan as compared to downtown Chicago and narrower streets as well. The avenues in Manhattan are probably bigger as far as number of lanes than downtown Chi.

Walking on the streets of Midtown coming from Chi you will have a different perspective than people visiting NYC from most of the other cities in the country cause you are used to tall buildings, but you will definitely notice that NYC has A WHOLE lot more of them. Downtown Chi you will see a wall of buildings on some streets but others might have tall buildings followed by short ones followed by tall ones and so forth to where its really not a wall of skyscrappers cause they are mixed with shorter buildings. you can count on one hand how many streets downtown Chi really have a true wall of skyscrappers side by side that stretches as far as the eye can see (pay close attention to this and you will see what I mean). Thats not the case in midtown Manhattan, it literally seems like every street has a wall of skyscrapers and you look down the street and you can't even see where the wall ends. And the buildings in NYC are built bigger as in girth.

Chi has tall buildings but the sheer size and number of NYC's buildings has a marked "holy sh**" feeling to it. Walking down the streets of Manhattan, whatever part you are in, there is just this energy the city has, others keeping using the phrase "I can't really explain it" and I will have to agree with that, there is something about the vibe of NYC that is unique and very addictive. Chi or any other city I have been to does not have that energy and you can notice it walking down the streets.

There are what seems like an unlimited amount of subways in NYC, in Manhattan in particular there seems to be a subway almost everywhere, that is not the case in Chi. While there are subways in Chi (red and blue line), they are not nearly as numerous, not even remotely close. The train cars are a lot more spacious in NYC and the subways are much bigger. Just about every subway in Chi has 2 tracks one in each direction, in Manhattan you will find subways with four or even 5 tracks, picture the brown or the purple line around belmont the amount of tracks there but picture that in a subway. Also in NYC you see multi level subways as in subways below subways.

Everything is just more. Another marked difference in NYC compared to Chi is commerce. In Chi downtown its mostly chain type stores.. popular brands etc. NYC has tons of stores that are just small business kind of stores that are not name brand. Obviously the popular name brand stores are here as well, in large numbers but there are large numbers of the so called "no name" kind of stores too. they are everywhere and its mind blowing how much commerce NYC has.

Lets just put it like this Chi downtown seems like a big city that was built with a ruler and all the tools used to make sure it is properly structured and everything is in place in the right proportion and everything fits where it is supposed to fit so it can be symmetrically a masterpiece in terms of aesthetic organization and will make an observer be wowed at how such a big city could be so well thought up and molded into this. NYC on the other hand seems like a place that just grew to the size it is not because of trying to fit any scheme but just cause things just kept being pilled on top of each other till this ginormous thing came out of it. Don't get me wrong NYC is a beautiful city but it just doesn't seem like it grew under the restrictions Chi grew under.

Lastly you will also notice a difference in how people dress in general. I think people in both cities dress well but you will notice that there is probably more of an individualistic creativity to the way people dress in NYC compared to Chi. In Chicago typically people dress alike sort of.. If there is a certain style that is nice and acceptable, most people in Chi just have variations of the same style, but in NYC its more individualistic. I'm not going to say any is better cause things like fashion and how beautiful people look are things of personal opinion so thats not my place to judge, but I do notice a difference in regards to dressing as a whole. Maybe its cause in Chi the only melting pot of the City is downtown and other than that is segregated by ethnic groups for most of the city. most of the people that are downtown everyday don't live there and at the end of the day everybody goes back to their own part of town which is mostly populated by people of the same ethnic group, and they end up acting, alike dressing alike etc cause of the lack of variation. So when people of each ethnic group come downtown you end up being able to identify each ethnic group by their style of dressing cause its whats common in their segregated part of town... Anyway its another aspect that is different in NYC. Also I think people in NYC are somewhat nicer than people in Chi. In Chicago a lot of people are on edge and constantly seem like they have to prove that they are tough or not push overs, and I don't get that vibe in NYC, people don't seem as edgy.

Thats my 2 cents, I won't go into the other boroughs cause thats a whole other twist but I hope this helps.
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