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Old 09-02-2015, 02:33 PM
 
1,462 posts, read 1,504,095 times
Reputation: 1019

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That's our steeps.

 
Old 09-02-2015, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Boston
7,336 posts, read 15,298,585 times
Reputation: 8612
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
The only difference between the Roman Colosseum, and the Astrodome is simply the time of building, nothing more. Both were indeed engineering feats and innovations for their respective times, and should be honored for that. All these comments of shock and surprise at comparing the Astrodome to Rome, and yet no compelling arguments as to why such a comparison would be unwarranted.
The only difference between a minnow and a great white shark is size. Nothing more.

Are you kidding? "simply time" is an absurd, and delusional understatement worthy of laughter. Unfortunately, I'm bored enough to waste keystrokes responding.

Here are a few arguments that you probably won't find compelling since you're already at a point where you'll compare a semi-vacant concrete dome from 1960 to the Colosseum. "Time" in this case is extremely significant. We're talking 2000 years since the Colosseum was built and 50 since the Astrodome was built. That's a HUGE difference. Someone could have theoretically been alive both when Jesus died and when the Colosseum was built. The historical implications are many. It's one of the most notable remnants and symbols of ancient imperial Rome- the empire that is largely responsible for the spread of Christianity, the prevalence of Romance languages (derived from Latin), the alphabet, calendar, the basis of democracy, etc. The Colosseum has survived the rise and fall of empires, looters and robbers, the Middle Ages, earthquakes, wars, etc. It was home to some of the first iterations of organized sports. Many of our organized sports today have roots and ties to games played in the Colosseum. Sports and events were hosted there for hundreds of years. On the other hand, The Astrodome has been around since the 1960s. It may not survive another decade. It's already obsolete, it's not really symbolic of anything, nor is it considered particularly remarkable by most. Talk to me when the Astrodome hosts events for hundreds of years and survives thousands of years of the rise and fall of the Houstonian empire, natural disasters, wars, etc.

The Astrodome was an admirable engineering feat. The Colosseum was an engineering feat of epic proportions. The construction of the Colosseum pioneered some construction materials, techniques and styles that we still use today (like concrete mixing, vaulted arches, and even standardized parts). Again, all 2000 years ago. It's one of the engineering wonders of the ancient world. The Astrodome is an impressive feat of engineering (using a massive dome design perfect by non other than the same Romans who built the colosseum), but it's hardly one of the more remarkable engineering marvels of the last 100 years, let alone the last 2,000. If you asked people, "whats more impressive, the Astrodome or the the Three Gorges Dam, Channel Tunnel, Millay Viaduct, Panama Canal, Hadron Collider, Akashi Kaikyo Bridge, Burj Khalifa, International Space Station, Hoover Dam, etc." They'd laugh at the Astrodome being included in the discussion.

It's definitely a neat landmark, but it's not even close to being in the same tier as the Colosseum or hundreds of other notable structures built in the thousands of since the construction of the Colosseum.
 
Old 09-02-2015, 03:21 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,554 posts, read 7,300,066 times
Reputation: 8603
^^^ Can't wait to see the reply to this.
 
Old 09-02-2015, 03:27 PM
 
1,462 posts, read 1,504,095 times
Reputation: 1019
Yup. I actually read the whole thing and I'm not interested in the topic at all but was entertained throughout. I saw 2 typos and felt rly bad that such a good post still wasn't 100% perfect
 
Old 09-02-2015, 03:29 PM
BCB
 
1,006 posts, read 1,351,478 times
Reputation: 631
I'm saving this discussion for dinner....might pop some popcorn.
 
Old 09-02-2015, 03:30 PM
Status: "waite untill next year. It was fun while it lasted !" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: Beautiful Northwest Houston
4,644 posts, read 4,480,463 times
Reputation: 3835
Quote:
Originally Posted by dalparadise View Post
Yes, it was impressive in the 60s to have a roof over your baseball park. But, it also diminished the game experience. Likewise, the cookie-cutter, multi-use stadium configuration that you correctly identify as being of the Astrodome's influence is seen today as a great negative in sports and a major reason it was not preserved as a stadium, despite being expanded and updated. It's simply not a very pleasant place to watch a sporting event, which is a major failure of a stadium, wouldn't you agree?

Your point is taken, though. Wrigley and Fenway aren't all that pretty. But they are steeped in the heritage of their sports and the experiences they provide. They are fixtures in their neighborhoods and their atmosphere spills out around their sites. They represent the good contributions to sports and to cities that stadiums can make, rather than the negatives.

The Astrodome is a nondescript concrete and steel eyesore sitting in the middle of a square mile of asphalt, beside a busy freeway across from open fields, car dealers and a couple of shady rundown apartment complexes. It ain't The Roman Forum.
If providing a climate controlled sheltered playing field did not enhance the game experience then why have so many other climate controlled stadiums been built ? Perhaps the multi-use aspects have gone by the wayside but that was a trend the Dome was following not setting. Did you know that Yankee Stadium was originally designed to be "multi-purpose ?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multi-purpose_stadium Look at the paragraph "History in the United States".

As far as where it is built it was common in the 60's, 70's and 80's for sports venues to be built in more suburban areas, again this was a trend the Dome was following not setting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by steeps View Post
Yes.... until, the City takes a stand. WHAT TO DO WITH THE ASTRODOME? RESTORE IT AND/OR? At least give it a CITY LANDMARK STATUS. Its Fate and recognition.... is in limbo....

If Preservationist see it as a LANDMARK? Then they should be mounting a Landmark status for the ASTRODOME. Before it is declared UNSAFE or Deteriorated too far.

Does the city have any TRULY ACTIVE PRESERVATIONIST?

I know thank God CHICAGO has some. They SAVED some HISTORIC EARLY SKYSCRAPERS, from demolition. After losing some, and Downtown's Movie PALACES. Too after losing some.

Hard to believe? They almost lost the CHICAGO THEATER. Now they make up the cities Off Broadway Theater District. Where some plays start before Broadway, and those that made Broadway can play.

But Soldier Field... though they SPARED THE exterior Greek Columns. Building a New Stadium inside the old. They had their LANDMARK STATUS REVOKED. The change was too drastic to keep that status.

Guess it is up to you HOUSTON.... Of, Course some repurpose to the ASTRODOME to save it....might suffice too? How about a MARKET PLACE Patterned LIKE ....
PHILADELPHIA'S "Reading Terminal Marketplace" It always busy. Or a forum for RODEOS in the city.... Ridem Cowboy... and Bull riding and Roping .... ?
First off the Dome is owned by Harris County and not the City of Houston. Secondly the Dome is a State protected historical landmark meaning there can be no major changes made to the Dome without their approval. It is also on the national register of Historical buildings. It is also structurally sound and not in any danger of rotting away.

Quote:
Originally Posted by marcopolo2000 View Post
The Superdome is more iconic and known currently than the Astrodome and yet no one goes to New Orleans just to see it.
As far as the Superdome being more iconic, that is a subjective opinion that may be true, however if it is true, that would be more of an indication that Houston is not on the opinion makers list of favorite cities whereas New Orleans is, more than any objective evaluation.
 
Old 09-02-2015, 03:32 PM
 
Location: East Central Pennsylvania/ Chicago for 6yrs.
2,539 posts, read 2,309,582 times
Reputation: 1483
Quote:
Originally Posted by BCB View Post
The overuse of caps is ironic.

The point of capitalizing a word is to add emphasis, stress if you will. However, when every other word is capitalized you lose emphasis.

Furthermore, it makes posts difficult to read.
and your POINT on the post is.......
  • Can or should the ASTRODOME be Re-purposed?
  • Do you say SAVE it or Leave it stagnant till it is revealed ... as too far gone?
Certainly you can add some specifics? Ok it has State Landmark Status... So now what??

Last edited by steeps; 09-02-2015 at 03:59 PM..
 
Old 09-02-2015, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Baghdad by the Bay (San Francisco, California)
3,530 posts, read 4,088,859 times
Reputation: 3145
And even this accurate contrast of stadiums in Rome and Houston doesn't fully capture the appeal of one versus the other to a visitor. People are drawn to the Colosseum who aren't even aware of its engineering or political statements. It's not just because Rome is better at marketing, either. Seriously.
 
Old 09-02-2015, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,207 posts, read 25,896,902 times
Reputation: 8963
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
^^^ Can't wait to see the reply to this.
lol I don't know why he holds the astrodome to this high status. It's a 50 plus year old dome that even Houstonians do not care about.
 
Old 09-02-2015, 03:40 PM
 
Location: East Central Pennsylvania/ Chicago for 6yrs.
2,539 posts, read 2,309,582 times
Reputation: 1483
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack Lance View Post
If providing a climate controlled sheltered playing field did not enhance the game experience then why have so many other climate controlled stadiums been built ? Perhaps the multi-use aspects have gone by the wayside but that was a trend the Dome was following not setting. Did you know that Yankee Stadium was originally designed to be "multi-purpose ?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multi-purpose_stadium Look at the paragraph "History in the United States".

As far as where it is built it was common in the 60's, 70's and 80's for sports venues to be built in more suburban areas, again this was a trend the Dome was following not setting.

First off the Dome is owned by Harris County and not the City of Houston. Secondly the Dome is a State protected historical landmark meaning there can be no major changes made to the Dome without their approval. It is also on the national register of Historical buildings. It is also structurally sound and not in any danger of rotting away.

As far as the Superdome being more iconic, that is a subjective opinion that may be true, however if it is true, that would be more of an indication that Houston is not on the opinion makers list of favorite cities whereas New Orleans is, more than any objective evaluation.
GREAT.. So why is it left as it is? LANDMARK STATUS really has little to do with who owns it. Landmarks can be re-purposed. In Chicago... a iconic Architectural landmark became a TARGET STORE.



Across the street a LANDMARK ...one of the first Skyscrapers. Became a High-End Hotel. Movie Palaces became Live Broadway-like Theaters. Printing manufacturing buildings became..... Printers Row Living Condos. Ect. The list goes on..... All have Landmark Status.

Last edited by steeps; 09-02-2015 at 04:00 PM..
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