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View Poll Results: Most prestigious
Los Angeles 114 44.36%
Chicago 39 15.18%
Washington, DC 44 17.12%
San Francisco 60 23.35%
Voters: 257. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-27-2015, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,392 posts, read 55,223,333 times
Reputation: 15488

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Ambitious View Post
The same article alludes to how tech companies, not San Francisco's "prestige", lures those graduates to the area. Its not the allure of San Francisco, it the allure of Silicon Valley's companies and the Tech industry as a whole and not because those people necessarily want to live in San Francisco.

"A couple trends emerge from this admittedly rudimentary analysis. First, letís just get this out of the way, Google is a force of nature."

"While the data isnít perfect and it only shows the migration path of a sliver of the worldís tech talent"
Yes, and what is LA's answer to Google?

A single company beats the entirety of Los Angeles?

Like I said, the author of the article posed the question you all deflect like a hot potato:
Why arenít we more attractive to smart outsiders looking to make a name for themselves?

Ponder on that before you start popping off at the mouth about a region that actually has it's sh*t together far better than you do.

At present time, the Bay Area is the apex of economic and political power and prestige of the west coast.

What exactly is LA's answer to that? Beaches and Mansions?

 
Old 08-27-2015, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Downtown LA
1,192 posts, read 1,294,681 times
Reputation: 848
Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
Hahaha it's my absolute pleasure to teach you yet again.

This actually it was created scouring the 300 Million users who provide this info to LinkedIn, the largest professional referral network on planet earth.

By an LA-based writer worried about LA being left behind whilst NY and SF pull away as a magnet for the graduates of the most prestigious institutions of higher learning in the United States.
This is the question he posed, that ZERO LA FORUMERS EVER WANT TO TALK ABOUT:
As LA looks to establish itself as a destination for top entrepreneurs to build companies, those currently in the community need to take a hard look at this data and address the shortcomings. Why aren’t we more attractive to smart outsiders looking to make a name for themselves?

https://pando.com/2013/07/04/inside-...ent-conundrum/
Meh. He brings up some good points in the post, but the article is also more than 2 years old. Here's the same author 8 months ago speaking about Google's move last December to purchase a $120 million property in Playa Vista and build a new 900,000 sq ft facility, and how it bodes well for LA's ability to become a magnet for engineers. Its a good read:

Quote:
Google makes a $120M bet on LA, potentially expanding its presence in the region nine-fold


https://pando.com/2014/12/04/google-...ion-nine-fold/

First and foremost, Google attracts the best and brightest talent wherever it goes. And while this may lead to short-term competition for other technology companies in the area, in the long-term it will mean more talent will gravitate toward and stay in LA, rather than fleeing to San Francisco or New York. As we have seen time and again with large employers in this and other markets, that talent inevitably cycles through the rest of the ecosystem, either as founders themselves or as highly-skilled employees. An additional 6,000 Google-caliber workers in town is a big win for everyone..
If you're going to cherrypick, at least make sure you're up to date. If there's one thing cities are not, its frozen in time.
 
Old 08-27-2015, 01:31 PM
 
Location: MPLS/CHI
553 posts, read 483,254 times
Reputation: 389
Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
Yes, and what is LA's answer to Google?

A single company beats the entirety of Los Angeles?

Like I said, the author of the article posed the question you all deflect like a hot potato:
Why arenít we more attractive to smart outsiders looking to make a name for themselves?

Ponder on that before you start popping off at the mouth about a region that actually has it's sh*t together far better than you do.

At present time, the Bay Area is the apex of economic and political power and prestige of the west coast.

What exactly is LA's answer to that? Beaches and Mansions?
What is LA's answer to Walmart and Exxon? I guess that makes Bentonville and Dallas more prestigious than LA. Thanks for clearing that up. Oh yea, when you're precious little bubble bursts then we'll see how prestigious San Francisco can remain.
 
Old 08-27-2015, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,888 posts, read 10,402,608 times
Reputation: 8055
Quote:
Originally Posted by qworldorder View Post
So we're just supposed to throw the baby out with the bath water? There's NO common general consensus for what is prestigious and it's all subjective? I think that that thinking is just as bad as claiming there's a universal, strict definition of prestige. Sure, there's wiggle room and it's always evolving, but prestige isn't THAT subjective of a concept.
How many Cops or Firefighters do you think would describe their job as "prestegious"? Not very many IMO.

Maybe a Commisioner but not an entry level job.

(Quoted wrong post actually but I'm sure you get what I mean)
 
Old 08-27-2015, 01:32 PM
 
Location: NYC
2,319 posts, read 2,588,589 times
Reputation: 1665
Quote:
Originally Posted by qworldorder View Post
I disagree. To the average American, firefighting and police jobs are fairly exclusive. There are stringent physical and ethical standards one must pass to even make the cut. Yea, these are sometimes ignored (sometimes with tragic results), but by and large, not everyone can be a cop/firefighter. It's not $30 million penthouse exclusive, but it's still relatively exclusive (and $30 million penthouse exclusive isn't as exclusive as civil servant, President of the United States exclusive).
There probably isn't a job in the world that can be done by everyone. I (and I am sure many others) wouldn't last a day as a highrise window cleaner -- that doesn't mean that job is "exclusive". Same with firefighters and cops. They are respected and sometimes even admired (or not, depends on who you ask), but there is nothing exclusive or prestigious about these occupations.
 
Old 08-27-2015, 01:37 PM
 
Location: LBC
4,155 posts, read 4,489,878 times
Reputation: 3543
Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
Yes, and what is LA's answer to Google?

A single company beats the entirety of Los Angeles?

Like I said, the author of the article posed the question you all deflect like a hot potato:
Why aren’t we more attractive to smart outsiders looking to make a name for themselves?
The same author already answered that for you: the presence of large anchor tech companies. Historically rooted in the Bay Area, good for them.

So why did you offer "[g]enuinely great downtowns and desirable, high density, urban neighborhoods, are always going to be a magnet to a huge segment of upwardly mobile people" as your explanation?
 
Old 08-27-2015, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,512 posts, read 2,979,226 times
Reputation: 2746
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
How many Cops or Firefighters do you think would describe their job as "prestegious"? Not very many IMO.

Maybe a Commisioner but not an entry level job.
I disagree. I'm ex-military myself, a very comparable profession, and a ton of emphasis is put on pride and prestige, even for the lowliest ranks. Prestige is actually a huge deal. Not prestige in the sense of money, but prestige in the sense of honor, of public accountability, of doing a difficult job that not many can do (exclusivity).
 
Old 08-27-2015, 01:39 PM
 
Location: MPLS/CHI
553 posts, read 483,254 times
Reputation: 389
Quote:
Originally Posted by nslander View Post
The same author the answered that for you: the presence of large anchor tech companies. Historically rooted in the Bay Area, good for them.

So why did you offer "[g]enuinely great downtowns and desirable, high density, urban neighborhoods, are always going to be a magnet to a huge segment of upwardly mobile people" as your explanation?
Exactly. That's why I responded to his post the way that I did. He was making it seem as if smart people are flocking to San Francisco because its oh so desirable and prestigious, when the article is actually presenting a different claim.
 
Old 08-27-2015, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,888 posts, read 10,402,608 times
Reputation: 8055
Quote:
Originally Posted by qworldorder View Post
I disagree. I'm ex-military myself, a very comparable profession, and a ton of emphasis is put on pride and prestige, even for the lowliest ranks. Prestige is actually a huge deal. Not prestige in the sense of money, but prestige in the sense of honor, of public accountability, of doing a difficult job that not many can do (exclusivity).
I think military is different as it's seen as a more sacrificing position by society-the pay/benefits are nowhere near comparable and the risk far greater than Cop/Firefighter. Many actually seem to resent Cops/Firefighters for the pension/early retirement, etc.

So I wouldn't have a problem describing more exclusive positions in the military (West Point, Naval Academy, etc.) as prestigious because there is a sense of honor and sacrificing yourself for society (in addition to the exclusive nature of the job), even if that is only the intent not the true reality.
 
Old 08-27-2015, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,512 posts, read 2,979,226 times
Reputation: 2746
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fitzrovian View Post
There probably isn't a job in the world that can be done by everyone. I (and I am sure many others) wouldn't last a day as a highrise window cleaner -- that doesn't mean that job is "exclusive". Same with firefighters and cops. They are respected and sometimes even admired (or not, depends on who you ask), but there is nothing exclusive or prestigious about these occupations.
Window washers don't have nearly as strict requirements as cops/firefighters. Technology has greatly reduced the physical requirements, the mental requirements are less, and ethical/moral standards are far less. There's no comparison here. Firefighting and police work are far more exclusive, no matter how you spin it, to say nothing of prestige.
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