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View Poll Results: Which is the best for me?
New York 1 2.94%
Chicago 2 5.88%
Los Angeles 4 11.76%
Atlanta 5 14.71%
D.C. 2 5.88%
Austin 4 11.76%
Portland 4 11.76%
Nashville 2 5.88%
Phoenix 2 5.88%
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Denver 5 14.71%
Miami 2 5.88%
Tampa Bay 0 0%
Dallas 2 5.88%
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Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 34. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-26-2015, 08:57 PM
 
Location: LoS ScAnDaLoUs KiLLa CaLI
1,227 posts, read 1,126,337 times
Reputation: 1179

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TitanRam View Post
That's why I've decided to break it up into chunks. I study for the LSAT during lunch (or after work if I can't find time) during the week, take a full practice test on Saturdays, and analyze the test on Sundays. I figured a year of this (studying for the June 2016 test) would get me into the 170-172 range (currently in the 157-159 range). Then, in the summer and fall of 2016 I could work on law school applications without having to worry about the LSAT. What do you think of this strategy?

And I really rather not return to STL. I need to go somewhere new and have some experiences.
A lot can happen in a year, but if you can stay committed, that doesn't sound like a bad plan. However, when you analyze your test, know why you got something wrong but also know why you got something right. It seems time consuming and a bit tedious, but trust me, once you can replicate your way of thinking on PT's, you can transfer that to the real test. It won't only help you during the LSAT, but also during law school.

My advice really is doing as many PT's as possible. I literally bought all 45 of them (though 30 of them came in a set of 10 in 3 different LSAC books), and did 40 of them.

Have you taken a practice course? If not, definitely take one. Keep in mind, this will also cost time and money as well.

If you did well during your undergrad (let's say a 3.7+) and get above a 170, pretty much almost every law school will be open, especially if you have a strong personal statement.

I'll tell you this: where you decide to go to law school will dictate where you will get your first job. No one really tells you that, but it's very much true. All the West Coast schools are pretty much West Coast heavy in hiring, all the East Coast schools are heavy with the Northeast firms, etc. etc. It doesn't mean you have to be in that area, but it will be significantly difficult to branch out a bit more.

Really, focus on the LSAT. I'd invest all the time and money into it as possible, because that will be the key to whether or not you'll get into a good T1 school or not.

Keep in mind that admissions really starts in October. Don't be me and wait until February to turn in your applications. If you want to do Early Admissions, do it, but keep in mind once you get in, you're locked into that school and have only until December to get that in.

Last edited by Lets Eat Candy; 08-26-2015 at 09:05 PM..
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Old 08-27-2015, 10:54 AM
 
987 posts, read 841,276 times
Reputation: 553
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lets Eat Candy View Post
A lot can happen in a year, but if you can stay committed, that doesn't sound like a bad plan. However, when you analyze your test, know why you got something wrong but also know why you got something right. It seems time consuming and a bit tedious, but trust me, once you can replicate your way of thinking on PT's, you can transfer that to the real test. It won't only help you during the LSAT, but also during law school.

My advice really is doing as many PT's as possible. I literally bought all 45 of them (though 30 of them came in a set of 10 in 3 different LSAC books), and did 40 of them.

Have you taken a practice course? If not, definitely take one. Keep in mind, this will also cost time and money as well.

If you did well during your undergrad (let's say a 3.7+) and get above a 170, pretty much almost every law school will be open, especially if you have a strong personal statement.

I'll tell you this: where you decide to go to law school will dictate where you will get your first job. No one really tells you that, but it's very much true. All the West Coast schools are pretty much West Coast heavy in hiring, all the East Coast schools are heavy with the Northeast firms, etc. etc. It doesn't mean you have to be in that area, but it will be significantly difficult to branch out a bit more.

Really, focus on the LSAT. I'd invest all the time and money into it as possible, because that will be the key to whether or not you'll get into a good T1 school or not.

Keep in mind that admissions really starts in October. Don't be me and wait until February to turn in your applications. If you want to do Early Admissions, do it, but keep in mind once you get in, you're locked into that school and have only until December to get that in.
I've been doing that with my practice tests; that seems to be universal advice from high scorers. I have not taken a practice course, but am considering it. And I got exactly a 3.7 GPA in college, which is why I've been shooting for a 170. I'm a little worried about my natural potential though; I read somewhere on the internet you can only realistically improve by 20 points (so that would cap me out at 166, as my diagnostic was a 146, and like I said, I'm currently in the 157-159 range). To avoid blowing practice tests, I've stopped taking them and gotten back to working on the basics and fundamentals (especially with logical reasoning), but I figured that I'd start doing PT's again in September.
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Old 08-27-2015, 12:33 PM
 
Location: LoS ScAnDaLoUs KiLLa CaLI
1,227 posts, read 1,126,337 times
Reputation: 1179
Quote:
Originally Posted by TitanRam View Post
I've been doing that with my practice tests; that seems to be universal advice from high scorers. I have not taken a practice course, but am considering it. And I got exactly a 3.7 GPA in college, which is why I've been shooting for a 170. I'm a little worried about my natural potential though; I read somewhere on the internet you can only realistically improve by 20 points (so that would cap me out at 166, as my diagnostic was a 146, and like I said, I'm currently in the 157-159 range). To avoid blowing practice tests, I've stopped taking them and gotten back to working on the basics and fundamentals (especially with logical reasoning), but I figured that I'd start doing PT's again in September.
Definitely invest in a practice course, if no other reason than to just get you in a daily (or biweekly, depending on class) habit of doing PT's. I personally did Powerscore, but I know prices for it have gone up since I took the class in 2011.

Don't believe everything you read on the internet regarding how well you can do. Logic Games, for example, was my worst section on the LSAT initially. I literally did one every single day, especially after LSAT course, and I missed 1 question on the whole section.

Reading Comprehension really is just a longer version of your typical Logical Reasoning question.

Like I said and others SHOULD be saying to you - get into a school first. Then decide on location next.
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Old 08-27-2015, 03:55 PM
 
987 posts, read 841,276 times
Reputation: 553
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lets Eat Candy View Post
Definitely invest in a practice course, if no other reason than to just get you in a daily (or biweekly, depending on class) habit of doing PT's. I personally did Powerscore, but I know prices for it have gone up since I took the class in 2011.

Don't believe everything you read on the internet regarding how well you can do. Logic Games, for example, was my worst section on the LSAT initially. I literally did one every single day, especially after LSAT course, and I missed 1 question on the whole section.

Reading Comprehension really is just a longer version of your typical Logical Reasoning question.

Like I said and others SHOULD be saying to you - get into a school first. Then decide on location next.
There are a lot of practice classes in STL, so I'll do some digging and see what I find. Do you think it'd be more helpful to take right before the test, or to get it started now and then keep learning/working off those fumes?

And I'll take the advice on picking a location after getting into law school; makes perfect sense.



BUT.....I'd still like to hear what people think is the ideal location for me haha.
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Old 08-27-2015, 04:32 PM
 
Location: LoS ScAnDaLoUs KiLLa CaLI
1,227 posts, read 1,126,337 times
Reputation: 1179
Quote:
Originally Posted by TitanRam View Post
There are a lot of practice classes in STL, so I'll do some digging and see what I find. Do you think it'd be more helpful to take right before the test, or to get it started now and then keep learning/working off those fumes?

And I'll take the advice on picking a location after getting into law school; makes perfect sense.



BUT.....I'd still like to hear what people think is the ideal location for me haha.
That depends on how good of a test taker you are and how you learn. Tests like the LSAT are more process driven than memorization, so I'd advise doing the class at least a good 3-4 months before the test so you know exactly why you're getting things right and wrong with some sort of official explanation than you just shooting in the dark.

Other people are crammers. I'm not one of them.

You seem like a bright person though. I'm sure you'll do fine!
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Old 08-27-2015, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
5,602 posts, read 3,511,203 times
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Phoenix for sure, more specifically Scottsdale/Tempe. Lots of young singles there, a happening nightlife scene, lots of outdoorsy activities, dry air, and unlike Denver/Chicago/DC/NYC, youll never need a shovel.
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Old 08-27-2015, 07:30 PM
 
Location: Center City, Philadelphia
4,568 posts, read 2,547,155 times
Reputation: 2863
Just going to say if you want to live in a big affordable city with multiple law schools, Philadelphia is a good option. Fits pretty much all your criteria
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Old 08-27-2015, 09:36 PM
 
987 posts, read 841,276 times
Reputation: 553
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lets Eat Candy View Post
That depends on how good of a test taker you are and how you learn. Tests like the LSAT are more process driven than memorization, so I'd advise doing the class at least a good 3-4 months before the test so you know exactly why you're getting things right and wrong with some sort of official explanation than you just shooting in the dark.

Other people are crammers. I'm not one of them.

You seem like a bright person though. I'm sure you'll do fine!
Thanks for the kind words! There are some classes starting after the October LSAT that last until December, so that might be a good timeframe for me.
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Old 08-27-2015, 09:38 PM
 
987 posts, read 841,276 times
Reputation: 553
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIG CATS View Post
Phoenix for sure, more specifically Scottsdale/Tempe. Lots of young singles there, a happening nightlife scene, lots of outdoorsy activities, dry air, and unlike Denver/Chicago/DC/NYC, youll never need a shovel.
Arizona State does have a great law school....
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Old 08-27-2015, 09:42 PM
 
987 posts, read 841,276 times
Reputation: 553
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedirtypirate View Post
Just going to say if you want to live in a big affordable city with multiple law schools, Philadelphia is a good option. Fits pretty much all your criteria
I knew I forgot to list a city! I got a ton of responses in my General U.S. thread recommending Philly.
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