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Old 08-29-2015, 12:00 PM
 
987 posts, read 833,411 times
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I think figuring out your preference stems from living in different places. I never knew I was an urbanite until I studied abroad in a major city for a semester. Now I know I prefer large cities.
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Old 08-30-2015, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Denver
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Thanks for the replies!

So basically amenities are the things a big city offers, and basically you want a city with a majority of the amenities you want with the smallest population. So, if income or other things were not an issue, you'd pick New Orleans over something like Dallas because while they have similar amenities, New Orleans has a smaller population, and therefore less crowds, less traffic...

The trick is figuring out which and how many amenities are important

Another thing I've noticed, it seems like if a city is <500k people, it doesn't really have much of a downtown to speak of, but cities > say 2.5 million, the downtown starts to price people out from living near it, which means you get pushed out to the suburbs for living... Obviously this varies place by place (Vancouver is just sickeningly expensive lol), but it seems that reasonable living near downtown in any of the big cities, even Houston, isn't really available.

This happened to me in Denver, I worked downtown, but the only two reasonable areas in Denver for housing (condo style) were about 50 min commutes with the light rail and weren't that exciting or beautiful of areas themselves. Well not that any housing in Denver is reasonable... but I think it would be the same way if I looked at moving to Chicago or something.

Also for employment, I know rural employment is bad, but is there a big difference in employment opportunities and salaries, both for starting and for later on/higher up in a career, between metros of say 600k and 6million with similar unemployment rates, factoring out cost of living?
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Old 08-30-2015, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Westside Grand Rapids
3,570 posts, read 3,043,472 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
T

Phoenix on the other hand feels like and offers amenities in line with what one would expect from a metro of around 2.5 million in population (not 4.5 million). The OKC metro feels like it should be in the 600,000 population range as opposed to the 1.3 million that it actually is.
And you base this on what?
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Old 08-31-2015, 11:26 AM
 
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Default downtown

There is also the question of whether a city does things well with what it has.

For example, is downtown basically a glorified office park? Does it become a ghost town at the end of the work day?

What about city parks?

Arts? Entertainment? Education? Sports?
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Old 09-01-2015, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
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It really depends on your personality. For some people, the population size is an amenity. I really like super big cities for the anonymity. I like the energy of people around 24/7. At the same time, in a smaller city (like Jacksonville) I like being able to shape the city. It's a lot easier to be a big fish in a small pond where people look to you to make things happen.

There are pros and cons to each and lots of young professionals struggle with it everyday. (Moving to a NYC or Chicago vs "doing things" in Jax)
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Old 09-01-2015, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Northern Illinois
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Unless you simply crave the "big city vibe", there are likely certain small/mid size cities that can give you what you want. Most big cities have what you need and a bunch of other stuff that you don't need.
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Old 09-01-2015, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Macon, GA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mauricelageorge View Post
For me, it must be bigger than Baton Rouge.
Memphis/Birmingham/St. Louis/Jacksonville is the best.
Dallas/Houston/Atlanta is too large for me.


Fort Wayne is too small and when i drive from chicago to fort wayne...The corn land on the 65MPH highway makes me feel asleep...
I'm leaning towards this thinking myself.

I've lived in Macon, GA (CSA 417,473), Huntsville, Alabama (CSA 683,871), and Columbus, GA (CSA 501,649). These small-to-medium, "smedium," metros are OK, but are a little to small for me.

Birmingham, Nashville, Jacksonville, Charlotte, Raleigh, etc. seem just right.

I may could do Baton Rouge though, since it's bigger than the metro's I've lived in.

ATL, Miami, Houston, etc. are definitely too big, but I could do it if I had to.

The huge urban areas of the Northeast, Bay, LA, Chicago....not a chance.
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Old 09-01-2015, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
5,796 posts, read 6,351,083 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blacknwhiterose View Post
Unless you simply crave the "big city vibe", there are likely certain small/mid size cities that can give you what you want. Most big cities have what you need and a bunch of other stuff that you don't need.
True. I don't mind a mid-sized metro (minimum 1 million) but my key desires are:

1) Transit infrastructure/walkability
2) Asian influence/cuisine (particularly Chinese)
3) Music, both classical and other

Obviously the larger the metro the more likely it is to meet these wishes, but I've been to some places that were suitable and on the small side.

If anyone is wondering, Jax does not come close to meeting these items (#3 is at least adequate). But it's my hometown so I'll spend my life trying to help make it closer to what I seek.
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Old 09-04-2015, 05:02 PM
 
Location: Valle Luna, Phoenix, AZ
4,335 posts, read 3,149,518 times
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I grew up in Phoenix, so a large metro. When I moved down to Tucson which is a few million smaller, I'm always wishing there were more people here. So I guess I prefer larger cities. I wouldn't even regard Tucson as small, maybe medium sized.
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