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Old 10-10-2015, 12:58 AM
 
Location: DC
2,044 posts, read 2,268,559 times
Reputation: 1777

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Order of importance:
1. NYC - Largest city in the US.
2. DC - US Capital, Region is heavily educated.
3. Boston - The universities put it above Philly and make it a global city, Region is heavily educated.
4. Philly - Second largest city on the east coast, but lacking the resources or concentrated knowledge capital (meaning people with a bachelors or higher) of Boston or DC.

The rest really do not matter that much.
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Old 10-11-2015, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC
670 posts, read 802,322 times
Reputation: 488
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbern100 View Post
DC shouldnt even be included in any northeast poll but I guess if people are going by that northeast corridor train route it could be. DC is a former southern swamp that was chosen for its southern location to placate the southern gentry after the revolution, named after one of the most famous southerners of all time George Washington, we are in the subtropical humid climate zone and this climate is about as different as can be from boston, buffalo, rochester, pittsburgh or nyc.
Northeast corridor train route? lol. No, DC is part of the Northeast Megalopolis - the most heavily urbanized region in the U.S.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northeast_megalopolis

Former southern swamp? lol. Chicago and New Orleans were actually built on swamps, far more than DC ever had. New York City had swamps too. There was one (a red maple swamp to be exact) where Times Square currently stands today:
Before New York — National Geographic Magazine
oh, yes....almost forgot.......13 square miles (or 8320 acres) of Staten Island was swampy as well as parts of Lower Manhattan and Brooklyn too.

A little more reading about how DC isn't really built on a swamp:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/poste...lt-on-a-swamp/

Oh, yes - a few more facts. There were 100 acres in 6 small swampy areas in the original DC - which amounted to about 2% of the total land area in the original city's boundaries. I'll repeat that again - only 2%. For some more perspective, current DC land area totals 39,072 acres.

And, about the climate. DC has 4 distinct seasons - winter, spring, summer, and fall. The humid subtropical climate zone that DC is in also includes a portion of Pennsylvania and half of New Jersey. New York City and Boston are in the humid continental climate zone. See how it also includes the word humid there as well?

Last edited by revitalizer; 10-11-2015 at 09:10 PM..
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Old 10-11-2015, 09:14 PM
 
3,618 posts, read 1,541,519 times
Reputation: 2194
Quote:
Originally Posted by revitalizer View Post
Northeast corridor train route? lol. No, DC is part of the Northeast Megalopolis - the most heavily urbanized region in the U.S.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northeast_megalopolis

Former southern swamp? lol. Chicago and New Orleans were actually built on swamps, far more than DC ever had. New York City had swamps too. There was one (a red maple swamp to be exact) where Times Square currently stands today:
Before New York — National Geographic Magazine
oh, yes....almost forgot.......13 square miles (or 8320 acres) of Staten Island was swampy as well as parts of Lower Manhattan and Brooklyn too.

A little more reading about how DC isn't really built on a swamp:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/poste...lt-on-a-swamp/

Oh, yes - a few more facts. There were 100 acres in 6 small swampy areas in the original DC - which amounted to about 2% of the total land area in the original city's boundaries. I'll repeat that again - only 2%. For some more perspective, current DC land area totals 39,072 acres.

And, about the climate. DC has 4 distinct seasons - winter, spring, summer, and fall. The humid subtropical climate zone that DC is in also includes a portion of Pennsylvania and half of New Jersey. New York City and Boston are in the humid continental climate zone. See how it also includes the word humid there as well?
humid continental and humid subtropical are very distinct climate zones. The northeast megalopolis is a hideous and hellish designation, it just sounds like an environmental nightmare. I didnt mean that term swamp as a bad term, i was just talking about the history of DC and the founding of our nations capital, Rome was founded in a swamp. Washington DC used to be called Rome

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Histor...ashington,_D.C.

"Southern states preferred that the capital be located closer to their agricultural and slave-holding interests. The selection of the area around the Potomac River, which was the boundary between Maryland and Virginia, both slave states, was agreed upon between James Madison, Thomas Jefferson, and Alexander Hamilton. Hamilton had a proposal for the new federal government to take over debts accrued by the states during the Revolutionary War.

However, by 1790, Southern states had largely repaid their overseas debts. Hamilton's proposal would require Southern states to assume a share of Northern debt. Jefferson and Madison agreed to this proposal and in return secured a Southern location for the federal capital"

Last edited by floridanative10; 10-11-2015 at 09:26 PM..
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Old 10-11-2015, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC
670 posts, read 802,322 times
Reputation: 488
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbern100 View Post
humid continental and humid subtropical are very distinct climate zones. The northeast megalopolis is a hideous and hellish designation, it just sounds like an environmental nightmare. I didnt mean that term swamp as a bad term, i was just talking about the history of DC and the founding of our nations capitol, Rome was founded in a swamp. Washington DC used to be called Rome

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Histor...ashington,_D.C.

"Southern states preferred that the capital be located closer to their agricultural and slave-holding interests. The selection of the area around the Potomac River, which was the boundary between Maryland and Virginia, both slave states, was agreed upon between James Madison, Thomas Jefferson, and Alexander Hamilton. Hamilton had a proposal for the new federal government to take over debts accrued by the states during the Revolutionary War.

However, by 1790, Southern states had largely repaid their overseas debts. Hamilton's proposal would require Southern states to assume a share of Northern debt. Jefferson and Madison agreed to this proposal and in return secured a Southern location for the federal capital"
Southern states.... that's overwhelmingly a political segmentation of the country. DC is geographically in the Northeast branch of the US. If you draw a right angle from the southern tip of Lake Erie (where US land begins to jut off to the northeast, DC falls to the northeast of the line).

Yes, we know that humid subtropical and humid continental are distinct climate zones. That does not take away the fact that they are both humid - but in differing degrees. Also, for as many times as I've been to Baltimore, Philly, and NYC, I definitely felt the humidity in those places as well, with Baltimore and Philly feeling humid as heck in the summer months.

Average annual relative humidity by city:

DC - 75% (morning), 52% (afternoon)
Richmond - 84% (morning), 52%(afternoon)
Baltimore - 77% (morning), 52% (afternoon)
Philly - 78% (morning), 54% (afternoon)
Atlanta - 81% (morning), 52% (afternoon)
Charlotte - 81% (morning), 51% (afternoon)
Boston - 75% (morning), 59% (afternoon)
Detroit - 81% (morning), 58% (afternoon)
NYC - 71% (morning), 54% (afternoon)

http://www.currentresults.com/Weathe...ity-annual.php

Average relative humidity in the summer months by city:

Tampa - 89% (morning), 63% (afternoon)
New Orleans - 90% (morning), 64% (afternoon)
Baltimore - 84% (morning), 53% (afternoon)
Boston - 81% (morning), 59% (afternoon)
Richmond - 91% (morning), 56% (afternoon)
DC - 81% (morning), 53% (afternoon)
Atlanta - 88% (morning), 56% (afternoon)
Baltimore - 84% (morning), 54% (afternoon)

Last edited by revitalizer; 10-11-2015 at 10:53 PM..
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Old 10-11-2015, 09:32 PM
 
29,513 posts, read 26,987,386 times
Reputation: 18084
Quote:
Originally Posted by revitalizer View Post
Southern states.... that's overwhelmingly a political segmentation of the country. DC is geographically in the Northeast branch of the US. If you draw a right angle from the southern tip of Lake Erie (where US land begins to jut off to the northeast, DC falls to the northeast of the line).
That's an interesting and uncommon way of determining what is northeastern.
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Old 10-11-2015, 09:48 PM
 
3,618 posts, read 1,541,519 times
Reputation: 2194
"southern states.... that's overwhelmingly a political segmentation of the country. DC is geographically in the Northeast branch of the US. If you draw a right angle from the southern tip of Lake Erie (where US land begins to jut off to the northeast, DC falls to the northeast of the line).

Yes, we know that humid subtropical and humid continental are distinct climate zones. That does not take away the fact that they are both humid - but in differing degrees."

I know what you are saying and I agree that maybe some aspects of Washington DC are politically much much closer to Newark, Camden,Buffalo, Boston, Wilmington, Syracuse, Baltimore, than Virginia or Charleston or Raleigh/Charlotte/ Atlanta etc.

I am just saying the day we get snowfall and the type of climate like the northeast ( Buffalo ,Boston, Pittsburgh, Syracuse, Erie, ,etc. ) is the day we have a national emergency on our hands at rush hour. We are not anything like a northeastern climate or much like the northeast by any means

Last edited by floridanative10; 10-11-2015 at 10:07 PM..
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Old 10-11-2015, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC
670 posts, read 802,322 times
Reputation: 488
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbern100 View Post
"southern states.... that's overwhelmingly a political segmentation of the country. DC is geographically in the Northeast branch of the US. If you draw a right angle from the southern tip of Lake Erie (where US land begins to jut off to the northeast, DC falls to the northeast of the line).

Yes, we know that humid subtropical and humid continental are distinct climate zones. That does not take away the fact that they are both humid - but in differing degrees."

I know what you are saying and I agree that Washington DC is politically much much closer to Buffalo, Boston, Camden, Wilmington,Syracuse, Baltimore, Newark than Virginia or Charleston or Raleigh/Charlotte/ Atlanta etc.

I am just saying the day we get snowfall and the type of climate like the northeast ( Buffalo ,Boston, Pittsburgh, Syracuse, Erie, ,etc. ) is the day we have a national emergency on our hands at rush hour. We are not anything like a northeastern climate or much like the northeast by any means
I wasn't speaking about politics. I'm speaking on geography, average relative humidity of cities from decades of data collection, and how DC seems to always get called about its 100 acres of swamp (as a form of insult nonetheless) when other major US cities near waterways had far more than DC ever had, i.e. Chicago, NYC, and New Orleans. And by the way Boston and New York City are really far apart on the average annual snowfall number. DC is closer to NYC in that department than NYC is to Boston. Also, Pittsburgh, Buffalo, Syracuse, and Erie border the Great Lakes, i.e. Lake Effect Snow. There are many different climates in the Northeast US. It's not all the same climate type.

Last edited by revitalizer; 10-11-2015 at 10:26 PM..
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Old 10-12-2015, 07:57 PM
 
Location: Villanova Pa.
4,910 posts, read 12,479,257 times
Reputation: 2627
Quote:
Originally Posted by DistrictSonic View Post
Order of importance:
1. NYC - Largest city in the US.
2. DC - US Capital, Region is heavily educated.
3. Boston - The universities put it above Philly and make it a global city, Region is heavily educated.
4. Philly - Second largest city on the east coast, but lacking the resources or concentrated knowledge capital (meaning people with a bachelors or higher) of Boston or DC.

The rest really do not matter that much.
Philly region may have as many if not more college graduates as Boston taking into account the population difference in MSA's. Philly has an educated work force but its percentages are skewed compared to Boston due to its large industrial past.

As far as Universities go U Penn is a perennial Top 10 academic school as is Princeton which is a mere 45 minute commute from Philly and I believe is included in its urban area. Swarthmore and Bryn Mawr Colleges are heavy hitters in the Liberal Arts Colleges. Not saying they exceed Bostons collection of Universities but what I am saying is that I dont think Philadelphia's education sector should be dimissed as trash.

Last edited by rainrock; 10-12-2015 at 08:58 PM..
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Old 10-12-2015, 08:31 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,632 posts, read 6,047,225 times
Reputation: 3522
Quote:
Originally Posted by revitalizer View Post
Northeast corridor train route? lol. No, DC is part of the Northeast Megalopolis - the most heavily urbanized region in the U.S.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northeast_megalopolis

Former southern swamp? lol. Chicago and New Orleans were actually built on swamps, far more than DC ever had. New York City had swamps too. There was one (a red maple swamp to be exact) where Times Square currently stands today:
Before New York National Geographic Magazine
oh, yes....almost forgot.......13 square miles (or 8320 acres) of Staten Island was swampy as well as parts of Lower Manhattan and Brooklyn too.

A little more reading about how DC isn't really built on a swamp:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/poste...lt-on-a-swamp/

Oh, yes - a few more facts. There were 100 acres in 6 small swampy areas in the original DC - which amounted to about 2% of the total land area in the original city's boundaries. I'll repeat that again - only 2%. For some more perspective, current DC land area totals 39,072 acres.

And, about the climate. DC has 4 distinct seasons - winter, spring, summer, and fall. The humid subtropical climate zone that DC is in also includes a portion of Pennsylvania and half of New Jersey. New York City and Boston are in the humid continental climate zone. See how it also includes the word humid there as well?
NYC falls under humid subtropical climate zone.
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Old 10-12-2015, 11:58 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,554 posts, read 26,887,722 times
Reputation: 9474
Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
NYC falls under humid subtropical climate zone.
According to this map it doesn't. Parts of Philly metro does though.

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