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View Poll Results: Most Powerful City in the South
Miami 9 10.34%
Houston 23 26.44%
Atlanta 42 48.28%
Dallas 10 11.49%
Phoenix 0 0%
Tuh, These aren't REAL CITIES just big giant Suburbs 1 1.15%
A Place not Listed 2 2.30%
Voters: 87. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-06-2015, 01:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Try more like the last year or two. Job growth is high, but when 90k people are still moving to the metro every year, the unemployment rate simply can't drop fast enough. If we didn't so many people still trying to move here, the unemployment rate would already be below 5% with the way our job growth is. The thing is, when you're actually in Atlanta, it doesn't feel like a city that has a bad economy.
Thanks for the correction.

And yes, Atlanta was experiencing rapid growth even when the economy was in the doldrums and that hasn't stopped. That certainly affects present unemployment statistics.

 
Old 09-06-2015, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Florida
2,233 posts, read 1,385,526 times
Reputation: 1855
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Try more like the last year or two. Job growth is high, but when 90k people are still moving to the metro every year, the unemployment rate simply can't drop fast enough. If we didn't so many people still trying to move here, the unemployment rate would already be below 5% with the way our job growth is. The thing is, when you're actually in Atlanta, it doesn't feel like a city that has a bad economy.
More people have moved to Dallas, Houston, and Miami during the post recession years than Atlanta, yet their unemployment rates fell more rapidly, just saying.
 
Old 09-06-2015, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,479 posts, read 7,721,989 times
Reputation: 7295
I wonder if the South will ever have a city that becomes "the city"?

See like in the Midwestern United States, nothing is up for discussion, Chicago owns that region pretty much. For example, it has the largest population in every single of the 6 measures that is used to gauge population (City, MSA, CSA, United States UA, United Nations UA, DMA). It has the largest corporate base for public companies in the Fortune 500 range, in the Fortune 1000, and the most for privately held corporations as well. It has the highest market capitalization in the Midwest. The highest immigration rate in the Midwest. The highest tourism both domestically and internationally. The most global airport and a lock on its regions logistics industry. The most foreign service destinations and flag carriers. The best collection of undergraduate AND graduate caliber universities. The most prominent suburbs. The most number of elite K-12 schools. The best cultural institutions. The best performing arts. The best infrastructure whether by land, sea, road, or train. The best culinary scene. The best streetscape. The best attractions. The best nightlife. The most prominent city in the entertainment industry, in the tech industry, in the finance industry in the Midwest. Chicago is home to the largest concentration of movers and shakers in the Midwest; the Billionaires, the multi-millionaires, the millionaires, and the wealthiest standard population of any Midwestern city.

It is pretty much the unquestioned top city in its region, by so far and away, that the second and third cities, which are close together on scope and scale are a huge drop-off.

The Northeastern United States works much the same way, New York absolutely crushes all the competition in every field in the Northeast too.

Now the Western United States is more debatable, Los Angeles is overall the most powerful city there but the San Francisco Bay Area literally gives it fits and takes several of the categories away, often times it isn't even close. However Los Angeles still keeps a big lead and takes the honors of premier city in that region.

In the South, it is like all of its attributes are split almost evenly amongst the Big 4 cities. It even seems like it'll stay this way forever. For example, Houston is by far the richest and wealthiest of the four (its economy is $80 billion shy of doubling Atlanta and Miami's) but it doesn't have the tourism, brand name, nor leisure component of Miami. Atlanta is the most culturally intertwined with the South in the social, historical, and cultural context of things, probably by far, but its market capitalization, Fortune 500 base, Fortune 1000 base, total personal income (and its per capita), gross domestic product (and its per capita), privately held corporate base, and population will likely never exceed Dallas-Fort Worth's.

So it is like they are forever stuck in a limbo, where one has things over the other, then the other has things over the initial one, vice versa, blood and gore, it goes around until it becomes a Mexican stand-off with 4 people holding 2 guns each with everyone pointing at 2 others in a square sort of standing formation (as seen from above).
 
Old 09-06-2015, 01:54 PM
 
Location: LA, CA/ In This Time and Place
5,425 posts, read 3,283,761 times
Reputation: 5033
Atlanta, case closed.
 
Old 09-06-2015, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Florida
2,233 posts, read 1,385,526 times
Reputation: 1855
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red John View Post
I wonder if the South will ever have a city that becomes "the city"?

See like in the Midwestern United States, nothing is up for discussion, Chicago owns that region pretty much. For example, it has the largest population in every single of the 6 measures that is used to gauge population (City, MSA, CSA, United States UA, United Nations UA, DMA). It has the largest corporate base for public companies in the Fortune 500 range, in the Fortune 1000, and the most for privately held corporations as well. It has the highest market capitalization in the Midwest. The highest immigration rate in the Midwest. The highest tourism both domestically and internationally. The most global airport and a lock on its regions logistics industry. The most foreign service destinations and flag carriers. The best collection of undergraduate AND graduate caliber universities. The most prominent suburbs. The most number of elite K-12 schools. The best cultural institutions. The best performing arts. The best infrastructure whether by land, sea, road, or train. The best culinary scene. The best streetscape. The best attractions. The best nightlife. The most prominent city in the entertainment industry, in the tech industry, in the finance industry in the Midwest. Chicago is home to the largest concentration of movers and shakers in the Midwest; the Billionaires, the multi-millionaires, the millionaires, and the wealthiest standard population of any Midwestern city.

It is pretty much the unquestioned top city in its region, by so far and away, that the second and third cities, which are close together on scope and scale are a huge drop-off.

The Northeastern United States works much the same way, New York absolutely crushes all the competition in every field in the Northeast too.

Now the Western United States is more debatable, Los Angeles is overall the most powerful city there but the San Francisco Bay Area literally gives it fits and takes several of the categories away, often times it isn't even close. However Los Angeles still keeps a big lead and takes the honors of premier city in that region.

In the South, it is like all of its attributes are split almost evenly amongst the Big 4 cities. It even seems like it'll stay this way forever. For example, Houston is by far the richest and wealthiest of the four (its economy is $80 billion shy of doubling Atlanta and Miami's) but it doesn't have the tourism, brand name, nor leisure component of Miami. Atlanta is the most culturally intertwined with the South, probably by far, but its market capitalization, Fortune 500 base, Fortune 1000 base, privately held corporate base, and population will likely never exceed Dallas-Fort Worth's.

So it is like they are forever stuck in a limbo, where one has things over the other, then the other has things over the initial one, vice versa, blood and gore, it goes around until it becomes a Mexican stand-off with 4 people holding 2 guns each with everyone pointing at 2 others in a square sort of standing formation (as seen from above).
Well the South covers a much larger piece of land than the Midwest or the Northeast. Why are Houston and Atlanta being put in the same box when Chicago and New York get separate boxes, despite being almost the same distance from each other?
 
Old 09-06-2015, 01:58 PM
 
6,795 posts, read 6,595,922 times
Reputation: 5411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red John View Post
I wonder if the South will ever have a city that becomes "the city"?

See like in the Midwestern United States, nothing is up for discussion, Chicago owns that region pretty much. For example, it has the largest population in every single of the 6 measures that is used to gauge population (City, MSA, CSA, United States UA, United Nations UA, DMA). It has the largest corporate base for public companies in the Fortune 500 range, in the Fortune 1000, and the most for privately held corporations as well. It has the highest market capitalization in the Midwest. The highest immigration rate in the Midwest. The highest tourism both domestically and internationally. The most global airport and a lock on its regions logistics industry. The most foreign service destinations and flag carriers. The best collection of undergraduate AND graduate caliber universities. The most prominent suburbs. The most number of elite K-12 schools. The best cultural institutions. The best performing arts. The best infrastructure whether by land, sea, road, or train. The best culinary scene. The best streetscape. The best attractions. The best nightlife. The most prominent city in the entertainment industry, in the tech industry, in the finance industry in the Midwest. Chicago is home to the largest concentration of movers and shakers in the Midwest; the Billionaires, the multi-millionaires, the millionaires, and the wealthiest standard population of any Midwestern city.

It is pretty much the unquestioned top city in its region, by so far and away, that the second and third cities, which are close together on scope and scale are a huge drop-off.

The Northeastern United States works much the same way, New York absolutely crushes all the competition in every field in the Northeast too.

Now the Western United States is more debatable, Los Angeles is overall the most powerful city there but the San Francisco Bay Area literally gives it fits and takes several of the categories away, often times it isn't even close. However Los Angeles still keeps a big lead and takes the honors of premier city in that region.

In the South, it is like all of its attributes are split almost evenly amongst the Big 4 cities. It even seems like it'll stay this way forever. For example, Houston is by far the richest and wealthiest of the four (its economy is $80 billion shy of doubling Atlanta and Miami's) but it doesn't have the tourism, brand name, nor leisure component of Miami. Atlanta is the most culturally intertwined with the South, probably by far, but its market capitalization, Fortune 500 base, Fortune 1000 base, privately held corporate base, and population will likely never exceed Dallas-Fort Worth's.

So it is like they are forever stuck in a limbo, where one has things over the other, then the other has things over the initial one, vice versa, blood and gore, it goes around until it becomes a Mexican stand-off with 4 people holding 2 guns each with everyone pointing at 2 others in a square sort of standing formation (as seen from above).
The South is also really large area wise and culturally diverse. Houston doesn't have the same culture as Atlanta and they don't have the same culture as Miami and none of these have the same culture as New Orleans. Atlanta to Houston is nearly 800 miles. Houston to Miami is nearly 1200 miles. Atlanta to New York City is 867 miles. You can kind of see where I'm going with this.
 
Old 09-06-2015, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Sumner County,Tn
602 posts, read 557,369 times
Reputation: 459
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red John View Post
I wonder if the South will ever have a city that becomes "the city"?

See like in the Midwestern United States, nothing is up for discussion, Chicago owns that region pretty much. For example, it has the largest population in every single of the 6 measures that is used to gauge population (City, MSA, CSA, United States UA, United Nations UA, DMA). It has the largest corporate base for public companies in the Fortune 500 range, in the Fortune 1000, and the most for privately held corporations as well. It has the highest market capitalization in the Midwest. The highest immigration rate in the Midwest. The highest tourism both domestically and internationally. The most global airport and a lock on its regions logistics industry. The most foreign service destinations and flag carriers. The best collection of undergraduate AND graduate caliber universities. The most prominent suburbs. The most number of elite K-12 schools. The best cultural institutions. The best performing arts. The best infrastructure whether by land, sea, road, or train. The best culinary scene. The best streetscape. The best attractions. The best nightlife. The most prominent city in the entertainment industry, in the tech industry, in the finance industry in the Midwest. Chicago is home to the largest concentration of movers and shakers in the Midwest; the Billionaires, the multi-millionaires, the millionaires, and the wealthiest standard population of any Midwestern city.

It is pretty much the unquestioned top city in its region, by so far and away, that the second and third cities, which are close together on scope and scale are a huge drop-off.

The Northeastern United States works much the same way, New York absolutely crushes all the competition in every field in the Northeast too.

Now the Western United States is more debatable, Los Angeles is overall the most powerful city there but the San Francisco Bay Area literally gives it fits and takes several of the categories away, often times it isn't even close. However Los Angeles still keeps a big lead and takes the honors of premier city in that region.

In the South, it is like all of its attributes are split almost evenly amongst the Big 4 cities. It even seems like it'll stay this way forever. For example, Houston is by far the richest and wealthiest of the four (its economy is $80 billion shy of doubling Atlanta and Miami's) but it doesn't have the tourism, brand name, nor leisure component of Miami. Atlanta is the most culturally intertwined with the South in the social, historical, and cultural context of things, probably by far, but its market capitalization, Fortune 500 base, Fortune 1000 base, total personal income (and its per capita), gross domestic product (and its per capita), privately held corporate base, and population will likely never exceed Dallas-Fort Worth's.

So it is like they are forever stuck in a limbo, where one has things over the other, then the other has things over the initial one, vice versa, blood and gore, it goes around until it becomes a Mexican stand-off with 4 people holding 2 guns each with everyone pointing at 2 others in a square sort of standing formation (as seen from above).
Yeah It's called Nashville....Jus Wait
 
Old 09-06-2015, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,479 posts, read 7,721,989 times
Reputation: 7295
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
The South is also really large area wise and culturally diverse. Houston doesn't have the same culture as Atlanta and they don't have the same culture as Miami and none of these have the same culture as New Orleans. Atlanta to Houston is nearly 800 miles. Houston to Miami is nearly 1200 miles. Atlanta to New York City is 867 miles. You can kind of see where I'm going with this.
Absolutely and you have a legit point.

Personally I like the way the region is balkanized between its 4 (or 5 -- Washington, D.C.) major population centers. If I had it my way, no one city in the South will ever capture all the features of the regions premier city, because none need to do that and should continue sharing the responsibility split 4 or 5 ways.

The way I see it is that I completely judge the entire Midwestern United States based off the on-goings of Chicago. To me it doesn't matter whether it is fair or not, but the city, through its domination of every single category except for the Automobile Industry, has taken it upon itself/has become a posterchild for the entire region. So when Chicago has an off-year or struggles, in my mind, I tend to view it as an off-year or struggling period for the entire region as a whole. Chicago, to be more clear, to me is the ambassador of the entire region. What happens there is a microcosm of that entire region as a whole and what is happening in the region as a whole, for better or worse, in my opinion.

In this vantage point, the balkanization of the South geographically, culturally, socially, economically is a very positive thing in that sense. No one city, to me, will ever become the face/posterchild/definition of the region as a whole and will subsequently not have to face the pressures of living up to top standards for the region as a whole.

I look at Chicago differently, when I see anywhere in the Midwest surpass it at anything, that to me is an indication that Chicago is no longer being competitive. I cant ever really view the South that way, it doesn't have that "the city" that completely controls it. Much, if not all of that can be attributed to the regions gargantuan size, but also because all of its 4 or 5 major population centers developed very very very divergent characteristics between one to the other 4, and vice versa.
 
Old 09-06-2015, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
8,386 posts, read 9,958,169 times
Reputation: 5230
Definitely Atlanta. You can't be the most powerful city in the South if it's a debate on whether your city is even the most powerful in its own state (Dallas, Houston).
 
Old 09-06-2015, 02:30 PM
Status: "waite untill next year. It was fun while it lasted !" (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: Beautiful Northwest Houston
4,651 posts, read 4,489,941 times
Reputation: 3835
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
Definitely Atlanta. You can't be the most powerful city in the South if it's a debate on whether your city is even the most powerful in its own state (Dallas, Houston).
That's ridicules Houston has a bigger economy than the whole state of Georgia, and that may be true of DFW as well, but DFW definitely has a considerably bigger economy than Atlanta. The OP may have overqualified what he meant by "powerful" but being a more popular city does not make it more powerful.
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