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View Poll Results: Which of the five is most Southern?
Atlanta gets a (5) because it is the most Southern city 141 76.63%
Houston gets a (5) because it is the most Southern city 13 7.07%
Dallas gets a (5) because it is the most Southern city 17 9.24%
Miami gets a (5) because it is the most Southern city 1 0.54%
Washington D.C. gets a (5) because it is the most Southern city 3 1.63%
Its hard to decide, they are all equally Southern cities 9 4.89%
Voters: 184. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-15-2018, 11:23 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,459 posts, read 1,041,031 times
Reputation: 1386

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
To be fair, the Mexican population in Texas is way more assimilated than Cubans in Miami. There's far more 2nd+ generation Latinos there compared to Miami. For the record this is coming from someone who is Cuban descent and super assimilated to US culture to the extent that folks don't know I am Cuban unless I tell them, and I definitely identify as a southerner. Many Cubans in Miami are not like this. Many don't even speak English and don't even try to learn. Mexicans in Texas are the opposite.

Many Mexican-Americans in Texas speak with southern accents as well. Though I have heard Cubans and other Hispanics in Miami who have an urban southern accent influenced by the dialect of southern blacks.

I agree that Miami is very much a part of the South even with it's high immigrant factor. But it's a very very unique part of the South. New Orleans is similar but not as extreme and the Yat accent sounds more northern than any local accent in S. FL. Yet no one can reasonably argue that NOLA ain't southern.
It depends on which Mexican population you are referring to:
  • The Tejanos, those Mexicans who have been in the area since the Texas Revolution, would be the most assimilated into the "traditional Texas" lifestyle. So assimilated that many of them don't even know Spanish. They are prominent in the San Antonio area.
  • Then you have the general Mexican immigrant populations, plus 1st/2nd generation. They are in the Houston/Dallas areas, and still retain a lot of their Mexican roots. The exceptions being those into hip hop culture, which can get them involved with the Southern lifestyle as it connects them with the local Blacks of the area (as seen with Houston).
  • The last group would be the Border Mexicans. These are your Mexicans in places like El Paso, Laredo, Brownsville, etc. The cities of the area are often part of international metros with cities in Mexico, implying strong connectivity. As a result, these areas of Texas are basically extensions of Mexico. The maquiladora economy is an example of this connectivity, where raw imports from the US are manufactured in Mexico to be exported back. Because there are no large American black and Southern White populations in this part of Texas, this is the Mexican group that has no influence whatsoever by Southern culture.
As Mexicans gain political voices in Houston and Dallas, there certainly will be quite some interesting changes. Quite frankly, the sizable WASP influence, along with their long-time weakness in dense urban vibrancy are the only two reasons why Houston and Dallas are viewed as "Southern" as they are.
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Old 01-15-2018, 11:49 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,459 posts, read 1,041,031 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
It's weird but despite all the coastline the South has, most of the big population centers do not have beaches in their urban areas. Florida would be the big exception to this rule, as like California and Hawaii, most of its population centers feature prominent urban beaches.

In Texas, it's basically drive on down and park your pickup truck on the sand. In fact, pretty much all of the South is like this except Florida. This is probably why, even with a conservative government and voting population, Florida is fighting to keep offshore drilling off of Florida's waters. Beach culture and importance there is on another level compared to the rest of the South. And indeed, much of the rest of the South drive down to Florida to enjoy the beach.
All the classic coastal Southern cities (i.e. New Orleans, Savannah, Charleston, etc) were just too fixed on the agriculture/plantation based economy, then tanked economically when that lifestyle vanished. No investors ever touched those cities to allow big economic booms (especially Savannah and Charleston), so effort was made simply to preserve the history to create a small tourist-based economy. There are some small resort towns (i.e. Myrtle Beach, Gulfport, etc), but that's it.

Texas was very close to having such a city/metro. But no, a hurricane hit Galveston, and the investors acted all scared. Nevertheless, South Padre Island is a popular Spring Break party destination and Corpus also sits right on the shoreline. If Houston were to develop a beach culture, then it would be more the "Los Angeles" route: the actual city center isn't on the beach/coastline, but you have several smaller towns/cities that are.

Even in Florida, the "Southern" part of the state (i.e. First Coast, Panhandle) doesn't have much large cities, unlike farther down the peninsula. This is despite the ungodly white beaches of the Panhandle.

About offshore drilling, it can actually offer the opportunity for some beauty, despite the negatives. The rigs used for the opertations provide support for coral and other sessile organisms to anchor, and so can produce artificial reef environments that become dive sites unto their own. Especially key in the Gulf of Mexico, where a lot of the water is too deep for coral to rest:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rigs-to-Reefs
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Old 01-15-2018, 11:55 PM
 
Location: Texas
2 posts, read 625 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuit_head View Post
I'm curious which Atlanta suburbs you think can North Houston be compared to? I don't see the comparison at all besides some superficial similarities... I just say that you'd have to explore more areas like East Texas, Northern Louisiana, and even parts of Mississippi (From Jackson on down to Hattiesburg, not the Delta region) to see why I don't think Northern Greater Houston is anything like Metro Atlanta. It's way too close to the Gulf and has a similar lifestyle, terrain, and feel to inland areas in those states rather than the Piedmont Atlantic Region that Atlanta is in. There are nuances and differences in those regions of the south that must be acknowledged. And yes, I'm comparing Florida cities because Houston has quite a bit in common with them. Orlando isn't on as much of a grid as Tampa is BTW thanks to all the lakes throughout Central Florida. Tallahassee is an excellent example as well, although it's only 20 miles from the coast compared to the longer distance The Woodlands, Spring, Conroe, Tomball, and Cleveland are. And Cleveland looks more like McComb, MS or Albany, Georgia than say, Fayetteville or Cumming. I also see a lot of similarities between Northern Greater Houston and Jacksonville too.
I agree with all of this
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Old 01-16-2018, 05:36 AM
 
1,760 posts, read 580,610 times
Reputation: 1786
1. Atlanta
2. Dallas
3. Houston
4. Miami
5. DC
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Old 01-26-2018, 02:45 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,459 posts, read 1,041,031 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
It's weird but despite all the coastline the South has, most of the big population centers do not have beaches in their urban areas. Florida would be the big exception to this rule, as like California and Hawaii, most of its population centers feature prominent urban beaches.

In Texas, it's basically drive on down and park your pickup truck on the sand. In fact, pretty much all of the South is like this except Florida.
And oddly enough, it corresponds well to the fact that much of the South except for lower peninsular Florida can see severe cold snaps in winter.
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Old 01-27-2018, 07:11 AM
 
241 posts, read 95,495 times
Reputation: 165
Atlanta - 5

Houston - 4

Dallas - 3

Miami - 2 (Miami does not feel Southern at all)

Washington - 1 (may feel slightly more southern than Miami, but itís statistics and wealth are Northeastern. It is also the capital and on the corridor)
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Old 01-27-2018, 11:55 AM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,243 posts, read 5,532,292 times
Reputation: 3256
Quote:
Originally Posted by geographybee View Post
Atlanta - 5

Houston - 4

Dallas - 3

Miami - 2 (Miami does not feel Southern at all)

Washington - 1 (may feel slightly more southern than Miami, but itís statistics and wealth are Northeastern. It is also the capital and on the corridor)
How does are its statistics and wealth northeastern if it is a southern city?
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Old 01-27-2018, 01:27 PM
 
1,876 posts, read 1,912,642 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
How does are its statistics and wealth northeastern if it is a southern city?
Because it isnt Southern as numerous Washingtonians have already stated.
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Old 01-27-2018, 01:45 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,243 posts, read 5,532,292 times
Reputation: 3256
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
Because it isnt Southern as numerous Washingtonians have already stated.
Maryland is southern, VA is southern, but DC is northeastern?


That makes total sense.
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Old 01-27-2018, 01:53 PM
 
1,876 posts, read 1,912,642 times
Reputation: 1310
Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Maryland is southern, VA is southern, but DC is northeastern?


That makes total sense.
I thought you were going to stick to Bmore being Southern. You're the only one that thinks Maryland is Southern anyway.

Let Washingtonians decide what they are and it's not Southern.
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