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Old 09-16-2015, 06:42 PM
 
202 posts, read 273,071 times
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I grew up in gr lived there most of my life and I never liked it there culturally there was nothing to do. I choose Indy at least there I can listen to the radio. See D1 and pro sporting events and they have the Indy black expo which pairs to hbcu's together every year.
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Old 09-17-2015, 08:23 AM
 
Location: San Diego
1,760 posts, read 2,935,979 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by magellan View Post
CP Morgan was the #1 builder in Indy for at least five years running, controlling nearly 60% of the market. Even mega national builders Pulte and Centex couldn't make a big dent in their market penetration.

Anyway, Indy's a fine place. I constantly see Indiana license plates in Michigan in the summer and they're very courteous drivers (better than the Illinois ones).
I'll admit, almost all of Indy's suburban areas are terrible. With that said, suburbs like Carmel and Zionsville have less in common with those areas, and neither does most of the north side. In fact, I'm pretty sure you could drive the full 16 mile distance from Downtown Indy to the northern border of Carmel (the largest suburb) and never pass one CP Morgan home. You'll pass some inner-city neighborhoods at first, then go through Indianapolis' most exclusive neighborhoods (Meridian-Kessler and Meridian Hills), and then go through Carmel (mostly custom built, and definitely not CP Morgan).

As a side note, CP Morgan was headquartered in Indianapolis, so that would explain their high market control in many areas.
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Old 09-17-2015, 12:34 PM
 
Location: Fishers, IN
6,495 posts, read 10,464,045 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by magellan View Post
CP Morgan was the #1 builder in Indy for at least five years running, controlling nearly 60% of the market. Even mega national builders Pulte and Centex couldn't make a big dent in their market penetration.

Anyway, Indy's a fine place. I constantly see Indiana license plates in Michigan in the summer and they're very courteous drivers (better than the Illinois ones).
Being the largest for 5 years is not the same as being responsible for most of the suburban home building. Furthermore, that claim would also include home construction within the city of Indianapolis, not just the suburbs. You can hang your hat on some point-in-time stat found in a magazine or on a builder's website, or you can take the word of someone who has lived in the Indy area for 20 years and resides in a suburban home not constructed by CP Morgan.

Interestingly, I could take you to a few subdivisions that were constructed before they switched to the "more square footage, less money" model. Those have held up pretty well.
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Old 09-18-2015, 08:18 AM
 
3,748 posts, read 1,341,107 times
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I have never been to Grand Rapids. Have been to Indianapolis. It was nice but seemed sterile and bland. It did not have a lot of its own unique character.
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Old 09-18-2015, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Denver
2,976 posts, read 2,395,835 times
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The thing about housing is if you can get the option you want or if they are all the houses are the same. CO Springs for instance doesn't really have a decent sized old part of the city that's affordable. There's some, but the vast majority are mass built single family houses from the 1960's onward. These houses are nice because they give the most value per dollar, but the city doesn't seem to have as many interesting parts. They're starting to build more diverse options now though.
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Old 09-20-2015, 09:53 PM
 
Location: South Austin, 78745
2,563 posts, read 1,729,915 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vlajos View Post
I prefer Grand Rapids, Indianapolis is a strange place.
What's so strange about it?
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Old 09-20-2015, 10:03 PM
 
Location: South Austin, 78745
2,563 posts, read 1,729,915 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Indy is the largest landlocked city in the world.
Where do you get your information from?

I ask, because in the United States alone, Austin, Dallas, San Antonio, and Phoenix are "landlocked" and they are all bigger than Indianapolis. San Jose is larger than Indy, but it's so close to the Pacific Ocean, I'm not sure if it qualifies as "landlocked".

Outside of the United States, Mexico City and Monterrey, Mexico are "landlocked" and both are quite a bit larger than Indianapolis.

I'll lay ya 5 there's more than a dozen landlocked cities thru out the entire world that are larger than Indy.
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Old 09-20-2015, 10:16 PM
 
Location: South Austin, 78745
2,563 posts, read 1,729,915 times
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I think a more fair comparison would be Grand Rapids and Fort Wayne or Grand Rapids and Lexington, KY.

They are similar in population and all 3 are 2nd largest cities in their home states.
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Old 09-21-2015, 04:39 AM
 
Location: Westside Grand Rapids
3,570 posts, read 3,036,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
I think a more fair comparison would be Grand Rapids and Fort Wayne or Grand Rapids and Lexington, KY.

They are similar in population and all 3 are 2nd largest cities in their home states.
The OP asked for a comparison for relocation reasons.

Fort Wayne covers a land area that is 2.4 x's larger than Grand Rapids footprint. Lexington more than six times as large in land area. Grand Rapids metropolitan area has over 1 million people, the other two have less than half of that in their metros. How is that any more accurate of a comparison?
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Old 09-22-2015, 06:26 AM
 
202 posts, read 273,071 times
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I think a fairer comparisonto grand rapids would be Omaha
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