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Old 09-16-2015, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,619 posts, read 24,814,812 times
Reputation: 11185

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natural510 View Post
Chicago was a "black Mecca" long before Atlanta. The South Side along with Harlem were THE destinations for black people during segregation, not only economically but socially and politically. I mean come on...Farrakhan and Elijah Mohammed, Jesse Jackson, Oprah Winfrey, Harold Washington, Ebony/Jet, etc etc etc. The black middle and upper class are just as influential and refined in Chicago as ànywhere else in the country.
Atlanta has been an "it" city for Black people for a long time. It's just that garnered even more attention as northern cities began to decline/stagnate and demographic trends reversed.
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Old 09-16-2015, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Nashville TN
4,925 posts, read 4,594,673 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by afdinatl View Post
You don't believe Nashville in the "Country Music Mecca"?
You got me on that one, guilty as charged lol. I take been told Atlanta is a black mecca so it must be true, if Atlanta is a great city for black people, thats great.
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Old 09-16-2015, 02:35 PM
 
2,029 posts, read 1,433,765 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
In NYC, you can be a Harvard-educated millionaire and still be treated like you're in the hood.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-e9k08kkH8
I'm not talking about NYC, though (we can pull up select racist incidents from any big city in America). I'm talking about Chicago, where Dr. King faced angrier, more racist crowds of anti-black white protesters than he ever encountered down South. That sentiment is still alive and well among many whites in Chicago to this day, and it shows and is still felt, even though it's not always as blatant as it was in Dr. King's day.
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Old 09-16-2015, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,619 posts, read 24,814,812 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by qworldorder View Post
These places being? I find it ridiculous to discount Philadelphia and Chicago because they're not presently "magnets", yet NYC gets a pass with a declining AA population.
Philly is not a "Black mecca." I don't think I would say that about NYC either.

There is no critical mass of upper middle class Black people in the Philadelphia area, only relatively small pockets in places like Mount Airy, Cheltenham, and Ardmore. If you're under 40, there is nothing really comparable to Bed-Stuy, although there aren't too many urban neighborhoods comparable to Bed-Stuy anywhere.
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Old 09-16-2015, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Silver Spring,MD Orlando,Fl
639 posts, read 1,048,120 times
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I'm always surprised that Houston doesn't get mention more with Atlanta as a black mecca.


I think Philadelphia qualifies as well. Philadelphia has a lot of poverty that brings a host of other issues. Still its history as a black mecca cant be denied. I think on the east coast it could be cost attractive alternative to DC or NYC for middle class black families.
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Old 09-16-2015, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,619 posts, read 24,814,812 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aimewitue View Post
I'm always surprised that Houston doesn't get mention more with Atlanta as a black mecca.


I think Philadelphia qualifies as well. Philadelphia has a lot of poverty that brings a host of other issues. Still its history as a black mecca cant be denied. I think on the east coast it could be cost attractive alternative to DC or NYC for middle class black families.
Detroit could also be considered a Black mecca based on its history. History certainly means something but it doesn't mean everything.
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Old 09-16-2015, 03:55 PM
 
Location: O4W
3,744 posts, read 3,534,103 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aimewitue View Post
I'm always surprised that Houston doesn't get mention more with Atlanta as a black mecca.


I think Philadelphia qualifies as well. Philadelphia has a lot of poverty that brings a host of other issues. Still its history as a black mecca cant be denied. I think on the east coast it could be cost attractive alternative to DC or NYC for middle class black families.
Does it fit the criteria listed?
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Old 09-16-2015, 03:56 PM
 
Location: O4W
3,744 posts, read 3,534,103 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UKWildcat1981 View Post
You got me on that one, guilty as charged lol. I take been told Atlanta is a black mecca so it must be true, if Atlanta is a great city for black people, thats great.
Lol
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Old 09-16-2015, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,504 posts, read 2,732,635 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Philly is not a "Black mecca." I don't think I would say that about NYC either.

There is no critical mass of upper middle class Black people in the Philadelphia area, only relatively small pockets in places like Mount Airy, Cheltenham, and Ardmore. If you're under 40, there is nothing really comparable to Bed-Stuy, although there aren't too many urban neighborhoods comparable to Bed-Stuy anywhere.
Define "critical mass". You could say the same thing about every other "mecca" only having "pockets" of upper middle class wealth. Philadelphia is still very much a draw for AAs in my region, for a variety of reasons (CoL, jobs, music, AA Muslim presence, etc.).

Furthermore, I think the OPs insistence on 20+ middle class areas is a bit vague in its definition, and is definitely favoring too much quantity. Why wouldn't ten areas suffice over twenty if those ten are richer?

And finally, theres too much discounting of culture and history in this thread, which are equally important in my eyes as wealth. In that vein, maybe we should include Houston and Detroit in the discussion. And aren't there wealthy AA enclaves in both metros? I think posters are trying to inflate Atlanta and, to a lesser extent, D.C. over other cities that are still attractive to AAs.

The word mecca is from the city of Mecca in Saudi Arabia, but Islam has plenty of popular, holy cities after Mecca and Medina. And I don't think we can definitively say Atlanta and D.C. are the Mecca and Medina of AA cities, to extend the analogy. AA Muslims certainly prefer Philly and NYC, for example.
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Old 09-16-2015, 08:17 PM
 
12,204 posts, read 17,577,064 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by afdinatl View Post
Does it fit the criteria listed?
Yep.

Now what?!
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