U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 10-08-2015, 10:07 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 3,817,110 times
Reputation: 4294

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
It makes a drastic difference in terms of politics. Cook County may be only 25% Black but Chicago is about a third Black. So Blacks exercise more political power there than they do in Houston. Same thing with Detroit. That makes a big difference as far as who city contracts get doled out to, who gets appointed to run the police department, the school districts, etc.
...if you live in the city propers themselves, but what if you don't? Chicago's politics don't matter that much if I live in Oak Park.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-08-2015, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,623 posts, read 24,832,767 times
Reputation: 11185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunion Powder View Post
...if you live in the city propers themselves, but what if you don't? Chicago's politics don't matter that much if I live in Oak Park.
It still makes a difference. You don't think Marion Barry helped build a Black middle class in Maryland by giving city contracts to people who lived there?

City lines are arbitrary for city-data "which is the most urban" matchups but they aren't for real-world purposes. If Arlington and Alexandria were reincorporated into the District, you'd see a complete dilution of the Black vote in the blink of an eye.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2015, 10:13 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 3,817,110 times
Reputation: 4294
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
It still makes a difference. You don't think Marion Barry helped build a Black middle class in Maryland by giving city contracts to businesses and people who lived there?
He probably did, but with that argument you would essentially be saying that Memphis is somehow a better city for Blacks than Dallas, simply because the core is much Blacker.

So I think my point is clear: focusing on core city populations and their politics will not tell the whole story.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2015, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,623 posts, read 24,832,767 times
Reputation: 11185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunion Powder View Post
He probably did, but with that argument you would essentially be saying that Memphis is somehow a better city for Blacks than Dallas, simply because the core is much Blacker.

So I think my point is clear: focusing on core city populations and their politics will not tell the whole story.
No, that's not what I would be saying as that is a complete non-sequitur. I said that the lines in this instance *do* matter because county-wide demographics don't represent the true strength of the Black voting block. If Brooklyn were still its own city, Black people would obviously have more political power than they currently have in NYC. But since Brooklyn is not its own city, and NYC is overwhelmingly non-Black, we will never have the type of political power you see in Atlanta or DC.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2015, 10:20 AM
 
52,714 posts, read 75,602,776 times
Reputation: 11636
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunion Powder View Post
...if you live in the city propers themselves, but what if you don't? Chicago's politics don't matter that much if I live in Oak Park.
Well, if you live in Olympia Fields or South Holland, your community will probably have strong Black political representation. So, it will depend on where you look in Cook County. I will say that the center city does have an effect on the suburbs, directly or indirectly though. Home

http://www.southholland.org

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 10-08-2015 at 10:46 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2015, 10:28 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 3,817,110 times
Reputation: 4294
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
No, that's not what I would be saying as that is a complete non-sequitur. I said that the lines in this instance *do* matter because county-wide demographics don't represent the true strength of the Black voting block. If Brooklyn were still its own city, Black people would obviously have more political power than they currently have in NYC. But since Brooklyn is not its own city, and NYC is overwhelmingly non-Black, we will never have the type of political power you see in Atlanta or DC.
I understand, but I stand by my point that these figures do not tell the whole story and are really nothing more than hair splitting in regard to UK's assertion of the Houston area being significantly less of a "Black mecca" than the other places.

Blacks still have more political power in Memphis than they do in Dallas, but there really isn't much else you can do with that fact.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2015, 10:31 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 3,817,110 times
Reputation: 4294
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Well, if you live in Olympia Fields or South Holland, your community will probably have strong Black political representation. So, it will depend on where you look in Cook County. I will say that the center city does have an effect on the suburbs, directly or indirectly though.
Again, I'm not saying that they will have no effect. I just think their influence is being overstated here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2015, 10:55 AM
 
12,204 posts, read 17,583,806 times
Reputation: 3350
I agree with you, Gunion Powder.

Even politically, the blacks here hold more power than the Hispanics. You have Quanell X, Shelia Green, and more that add value to Houston's political fabric.

Also, people tend to forget that Harris County is huge! It's 1700+ square miles.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2015, 12:26 PM
 
52,714 posts, read 75,602,776 times
Reputation: 11636
I would say that a way to look at things on the county level is to look at your county officials/commissioners. Here's Cook County IL info: Cook County Government, Illinois | CookCountyil.gov
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2015, 12:29 PM
 
44,662 posts, read 43,162,678 times
Reputation: 14416
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Yeah and this why I used the state figure as a bar, because it helps to automatically adjust for COL even in relation to metro median household income. Like you said though, the COL will vary within a state as well. So, that does have to be kept in mind. Here's a pretty good chart about that: Here are the most and least expensive cities to live in
One thing I noticed is that the cheapesr metros are often the smallest ones. I am also considering what would be the cheapest large metros vs the most expensive.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top