U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 12-03-2015, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,612 posts, read 24,802,203 times
Reputation: 11185

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I'd have to agree with that, and it's not so much that the bad areas of Atlanta don't have older housing stock because many, if not most, do, but it's just that they have fallen into such disrepair over a wider area. You'll see that along English Avenue, Vine City, Oakland City, etc. DC's bad neighborhoods aren't quite as blighted and tend to have better infrastructure than Atlanta's bad neighborhoods.
We need to clarify what "older" means. In the 30318 zip code (Bankhead), 71.2% of the housing was built after 1960. Only 7.5% of the housing stock in Bankhead was built before 1940. That's not a lot of "old" housing stock unless your definition of "old" is anything that isn't build according to LEED standards.

Atlanta's housing in its rougher areas appears to be in worse condition and that's largely a product of construction materials. A solid brick house constructed in 1907 is usually going to hold up better over the years than a house built in 1962.

There's also the streetscape. In Atlanta, houses are pushed back from the street with small yards (which in poor neighborhoods means unkempt lawns). The commercial streets are almost entirely autocentric. There's nothing particularly attractive about these areas. In Harlem, on the other hand, it's easy to see how Yuppies can envision a commercial thoroughfare now replete with weave shops and check cashing stores becoming lined with yoga studios and coffee shops with outdoor seating.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-03-2015, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,612 posts, read 24,802,203 times
Reputation: 11185
The area FJB327 was referring to (Mt. Olivet/Ivy City/Brentwood) is probably the worst part of the District in terms of urban form because it's plagued by so many light industrial uses. But auto-centric disaster zones like Ivy City (which is gentrifying actually) are the norm in the poor parts of Atlanta rather than the exception.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-03-2015, 09:34 AM
 
27,749 posts, read 24,763,128 times
Reputation: 16469
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
We need to clarify what "older" means. In the 30318 zip code (Bankhead), 71.2% of the housing was built after 1960. Only 7.5% of the housing stock in Bankhead was built before 1940. That's not a lot of "old" housing stock unless your definition of "old" is anything that isn't build according to LEED standards.
I know some of the stuff in Bankhead and SWATS in particular is newer, but some stuff in Vine City and Oakland City is older I believe--well at least what's still standing. There are more than a couple of vacant, overgrown lots in those neighborhoods as well, where houses used to stand. You don't really see that in DC either.

Quote:
Atlanta's housing in its rougher areas appears to be in worse condition and that's largely a product of construction materials. A solid brick house constructed in 1907 is usually going to hold up better over the years than a house built in 1962.
True but even a lot of Atlanta's older houses in the pre-war streetcar suburbs aren't brick, especially the bungalow-dominated neighborhoods. But brick houses generally hold up better regardless of the era in which they were built.

Quote:
There's also the streetscape. In Atlanta, houses are pushed back from the street with small yards (which in poor neighborhoods means unkempt lawns). The commercial streets are almost entirely autocentric. There's nothing particularly attractive about these areas. In Harlem, on the other hand, it's easy to see how Yuppies can envision a commercial thoroughfare now replete with weave shops and check cashing stores becoming lined with yoga studios and coffee shops with outdoor seating.
Yes and off the main commercial thoroughfares, the roads and sidewalks (where they exist) in many of Atlanta's bad neighborhoods aren't regularly maintained. Overall I do agree with you that DC's bad neighborhoods are in better shape than Atlanta's. Heck, Charlotte's bad neighborhoods are nowhere as bad as Atlanta's.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-03-2015, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,612 posts, read 24,802,203 times
Reputation: 11185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I know some of the stuff in Bankhead and SWATS in particular is newer, but some stuff in Vine City and Oakland City is older I believe--well at least what's still standing. There are more than a couple of vacant, overgrown lots in those neighborhoods as well, where houses used to stand. You don't really see that in DC either.
Vine City has older housing than Bankhead (13.0% was built before 1940) but it wasn't exactly ripe for gentrification the way neighborhoods around Howard were.


http://photos2.zillowstatic.com/p_h/...0000000000.jpg

Man, I remember when this street was Gaaaaangsta. They used to call it Beirut. But gentrifiers were undeterred by the violence because the housing was simply too beautiful to resist. I think a big reason why DC has faced more gentrification pressure than Atlanta is that it has an abundance of housing (comparatively) that rich people want to live in.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-03-2015, 09:59 AM
 
27,749 posts, read 24,763,128 times
Reputation: 16469
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Vine City has older housing than Bankhead (13.0% was built before 1940) but it wasn't exactly ripe for gentrification the way neighborhoods around Howard were.


http://photos2.zillowstatic.com/p_h/...0000000000.jpg

Man, I remember when this street was Gaaaaangsta. They used to call it Beirut. But gentrifiers were undeterred by the violence because the housing was simply too beautiful to resist. I think a big reason why DC has faced more gentrification pressure than Atlanta is that it has an abundance of housing that rich people want to live in.
That's pretty much what it boils down to. Gentrifiers love rowhouses, and when it comes to SFR, I think Victorians are highly favored. Bungalows can be hit or miss and much depends on the neighborhood and surrounding infrastructure.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-03-2015, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,612 posts, read 24,802,203 times
Reputation: 11185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
That's pretty much what it boils down to. Gentrifiers love rowhouses, and when it comes to SFR, I think Victorians are highly favored. Bungalows can be hit or miss and much depends on the neighborhood and surrounding infrastructure.
Any walkable neighborhood with historic housing stock is going to have a big fat Bullseye on it. Atlanta has fewer that are marked targets because it has few walkable neighborhoods with Pre-War construction.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gw1Xe5dKqOU
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-03-2015, 10:51 AM
 
27,749 posts, read 24,763,128 times
Reputation: 16469
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Any walkable neighborhood with historic housing stock is going to have a big fat Bullseye on it. Atlanta has fewer that are marked targets because it has few walkable neighborhoods with Pre-War construction.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gw1Xe5dKqOU
Right; those would be the streetcar suburbs and pretty much all of those have been gentrified already. But I think the next targets will be post-war neighborhoods with MARTA/Beltline access.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-03-2015, 10:51 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 3,809,474 times
Reputation: 4289
The paint job on those row homes is terrible. Looks like stucco.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-03-2015, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Arlington
641 posts, read 493,280 times
Reputation: 682
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcave360 View Post
What about LA, Chicago, Oakland, Baltimore, Dallas, Houston, Charlotte, Raleigh-Durham, New Orleans, etc.?

Ok, I know H-Town is fiercely obvious
Chi: michelle obama
Nyc: yaya dicosta
Nc: pam grier
NO: solange
LA: Tiger woods niece
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-03-2015, 11:30 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 3,809,474 times
Reputation: 4289
Quote:
Originally Posted by FJB327 View Post
NO: solange
You mean Dawn Richards.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S. > City vs. City
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top