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Old 01-16-2016, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kobe25 View Post
I believe New York City has the highest African American Population in America,So why isn't it considered the Black Mecca ?

I know Harlem isnt a Black Culture hub like before but the city still has lots of great Black culture to it.
NYC was discussed. It's just that the percentage and clout that Atlanta and DC has brings it up there with NYC.
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Old 01-16-2016, 01:01 PM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
3,987 posts, read 1,946,746 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
That's hard to believe. The vast majority of black people in the US are American. You would see this if you leave the East Coast (where it's still mostly Black American).
i think i know what you mean but this is an oddly stated sentence because bajan-americans, cape verdean americans, haitian-americans, ... are u.s.-american as well. you dont have to have a great-grandfather that was born here to be considered a cittizin [sic].
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Old 01-16-2016, 01:26 PM
 
52,710 posts, read 75,602,776 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Because it's based on percentage. Metro NYC has the highest black population in raw numbers, but it's percentage isn't higher than Atlanta, not even half if I recall. Atlanta has the 2nd highest black population in raw numbers, yet it's metro % is 34%. That's the difference.
NYC as a metro is 18-19% Black. I believe that Chicago is the same. NYC as a metro has about 3.4 million Black people, which is almost double Atlanta's figure and is more Black people than 20 states have in total population.

I believe that the Blackest metros outside of the South are Philly, St Louis, Detroit and Cleveland, as all of them are in the 20-25% Black range. I'm not sure about mid-major and smaller metros, but I don't think that there are any that are in that percentage range. Flint may be the only one(20-21% Black on the metro level).

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 01-16-2016 at 01:44 PM..
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Old 01-16-2016, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
5,580 posts, read 5,375,474 times
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Even though NYC and LA have small percentages, the sheer number of Blacks, and the artistic and cultural contributions, cannot be ignored. I think the perception is always that other metros, at best, offered their own regional take on what NYC and LA started. Its like the whole Atlanta hip-hop arguments on C-D.


But I look at it this way. You had Dayton and Cincinnati with funk music back in the seventies. Philadelphia had soul in the seventies. Chicago's groups, like Earth, Wind and Fire, brought a polished, smoothness to R&B we hadn't heard before. The deep South had a grit to their soul in the sixties. Memphis had a sound. New Orleans has jazz. DC has GoGo.


What I'm arguing for, is that if you go beyond what we've been sold as "Black", hip hop, etc. You'll see that plenty of metros have contributed to the Black "experience". So my Black, having grown up in Northeastern Ohio, might be different from your Black, wherever you're at. Its really hard to qualify. Cities like New York get the credit for definitive, unapologetic, non compromising, non assimilating Blackness. But that doesn't mean that experience does not exist anywhere else.
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Old 01-16-2016, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,237 posts, read 25,935,555 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stanley-88888888 View Post
i think i know what you mean but this is an oddly stated sentence because bajan-americans, cape verdean americans, haitian-americans, ... are u.s.-american as well. you dont have to have a great-grandfather that was born here to be considered a cittizin [sic].
Yes but outside a couple metros on the East Coast, the vast majority of Black people are "American".
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Old 01-18-2016, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Austin, Texas
3,093 posts, read 3,990,698 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
Even though NYC and LA have small percentages, the sheer number of Blacks, and the artistic and cultural contributions, cannot be ignored. I think the perception is always that other metros, at best, offered their own regional take on what NYC and LA started. Its like the whole Atlanta hip-hop arguments on C-D.
Honestly, you can argue that outside of Hip Hop, NY and LA are the places where black culture cultivated in other regions reached a MASS audience.

For example, outside of a few dishes soul food is really just southern food. When blacks brought those foods with them to other regions during the great migration that was the first time whites in those areas saw those foods. Thus, they became associated with Blacks in urban areas and picked up the name soul food.
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Old 01-18-2016, 08:45 AM
 
27,775 posts, read 24,814,471 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UTHORNS96 View Post
Honestly, you can argue that outside of Hip Hop, NY and LA are the places where black culture cultivated in other regions reached a MASS audience.
You have to throw Chicago in there too, particularly when it comes to music, most notably Blues and Gospel.
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Old 01-18-2016, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UTHORNS96 View Post
Honestly, you can argue that outside of Hip Hop, NY and LA are the places where black culture cultivated in other regions reached a MASS audience.

For example, outside of a few dishes soul food is really just southern food. When blacks brought those foods with them to other regions during the great migration that was the first time whites in those areas saw those foods. Thus, they became associated with Blacks in urban areas and picked up the name soul food.

That is what I'm arguing.


I'm saying that when you have over a million Blacks in a city and none of the other cities with a predominantly Black population have more than a million residents total, of everyone put together, and I'm not factoring in suburbia, you have a defacto, assumed Blackness, and assumed definition, because of the power of groupthink in those large numbers alone. All things considered.


Chicago was the only city large enough to come up against that in the 20th century. Now there are several metro areas. I'm speaking perception, ghetto statistics if you will. Figure if Chicago was half Black, with three million residents you're talking 1 1/2 million Blacks in Chicago vs New York's over a million Blacks throughout the city.


Basically I'm questioning the straw man arguments that are pushed on the C-D boards. In practice, a small minority of Blacks WITHIN the larger Black population of NYC sets the trends. Or did, because corporations set the trends now. And this created an unfair advantage where in a smaller city, say Atlanta or Miami, you have to push that much harder. Because no one thinks "Black" when they think about your town, and you aren't getting any help because your grind doesn't fit into ideas the powers to be are propagating about your town. So you end up with Black artists in Baltimore, Cleveland and Detroit no one hears about. And no one ever will, because historians have already decided where Black talent is supposed to reside. That's all I'm saying.
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Old 01-18-2016, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
5,580 posts, read 5,375,474 times
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It comes and goes in phases. Honestly, we don't control who gets the designation, paid shills do. Its like waiting for a food critic to "discover" you, and you've been doing this for 50 years.


Take hip hop. Everyone was doing it, everywhere. But you had to wait your turn to get the recognition. So after NYC, THEN we heard about California. And several years later, Atlanta, Houston, then Miami. It doesn't mean that Blacks elsewhere weren't doing it. Just means that the Blacks elsewhere were insignificant because they don't fit the narrative. The Blacks in NYC were geniuses. The Blacks somewhere else, well we don't know about them so much.


Its like colorism all over again. Divide and conquer. Willie Lynch letter, etc. It can make you feel inadequate. So then we flood into these cities in search of something bigger than ourselves. And we never find it.


In the case of NYC, the city reinvented itself off the backs of Black talent, and the energy of those social movements, and then turned around and raised prices which in effect pushed a lot of Blacks out. Not to mention that after 9/11 it was all but anti-American not to live there. Before hip-hop, in the seventies, Blacks could have the neighborhood because Whites didn't want to live there. It celebrated differences then, because if you had any options, you probably wouldn't be there.


I'm talking about what old timers keep yelling about on C-D. Especially about gentrification. I guess I feel a certain type of way because it feels like Black talent is commoditized, homogeneous, bottled and sold. And it feels like its disposable. And then after the party is over you have Whites with their cultural appropriations, making money, exploiting the situation even further.
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Old 01-18-2016, 09:46 AM
 
27,775 posts, read 24,814,471 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
Take hip hop. Everyone was doing it, everywhere. But you had to wait your turn to get the recognition. So after NYC, THEN we heard about California. And several years later, Atlanta, Houston, then Miami. It doesn't mean that Blacks elsewhere weren't doing it. Just means that the Blacks elsewhere were insignificant because they don't fit the narrative. The Blacks in NYC were geniuses. The Blacks somewhere else, well we don't know about them so much.
I'm not getting you here. Hip hop was actually born in NYC; of course every new genre borrows from pre-existing ones to an extent, but for hip hop, it all came together in NYC. Are you arguing that hip hop had multiple origins but was discovered in NYC first?
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