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Old 06-28-2016, 12:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
I've had co-workers transfer from DMV down to Atlanta within the past year. One actually came from Atlanta and then went back. A big part of it is the COL. One of my co-workers said the DMV COL is a big turn off for her on staying here long term and a couple months later, moved to Atlanta.
Yeah the COL in this region is something else. Since job growth has been on a big upswing in Atlanta for the past year or so, domestic migration is back on the rise, especially from more expensive cities.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mentallect View Post
True, but he left Galveston as a teen and built his lavish home and millionaire lifestyle in Chicago, so his name is pretty synonymous with Chicago.
I thought he was referring to John H. Johnson myself but I guess both fit the example.
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Old 06-28-2016, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
I figured the economy had something to do with it. DFW is more popular for Midwesterners period as a matter of fact.
Dallas is increasingly becoming to the Great Plains what Chicago is to the Great Lakes. This will become more apparent as the Great Plains actually begins developing larger population centers, as the ones currently, are all much too small (I.E. Omaha, Kansas City, Tulsa, Oklahoma City, Des Moines, Wichita, so on and so forth). That will change in the future, all of these areas will get much bigger. The Great Plains is the fastest growing area in the Midwestern United States in recent decades.

The Dallas side of the Metroplex has a real chance of following in Chicago's shoes from both a demographical, infrastructural, economical, and logistical perspective. I see a lot of overlaps between the two. The Fort Worth side of the Metroplex, of course, is a different animal altogether than Dallas or Chicago.
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Old 06-28-2016, 01:03 PM
 
Location: DMV Area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red John View Post
Chicago and Dallas' economies are a 95% match with each other. They overlap (to nearly the same extent) on the same industries and functionally, the two cities serve a similar role to the United States from an economical point of view. Only actual difference is that Chicago has the stronger financial industry while Dallas has the stronger energy industry but in either case, that's a negligible difference between them. Chicago is the #1 city for freight rail traffic in America, Dallas is #3, soon will be #2. Chicago is the #1 city for logistical movements of resources and supplies via NAFTA superhighways and/or trucking, Dallas is #2. Chicago is a major distribution and cargo hub, as is Dallas. United Airlines is based in Chicago, American Airlines is based in Dallas. Both cities serve similar roles as airport hubs and both have among the busiest ones on Earth. They both have similar tech economies, similar healthcare economies, similar trends in the legal field, both serve the same logistical role for the United States/North American continent, so on and so forth. Their suburbs are identical, almost to a T. I see absolutely zero differences at all between a Plano and a Naperville. So on and so forth.

Also, if you've noticed, going beyond just economics, Chicago and Dallas also share immigration and demographics with one another. Again, they are two of the closest big cities to each other in this regard in the entire country. Dallas is actually much more demographically like Chicago than anywhere else in the Midwest is, the key difference is that Dallas has superior integration than does Chicago.

For a lot of people in Chicago, moving to Dallas is easy because the Metroplex suburbs and industries are easy to transfer into or out of coming from Chicagoland, due to the overlap of commonalities.

Atlanta is another that shares these kinship values and characteristics with these two, however it is culturally more different than the other two due to its "Black Mecca" reputation, different infrastructural layout (no grid, suburbs are less cohesive, lower in density).
Excellent post and makes so much sense due to Chicago and DFWs locations in their respective regions, especially from a logistical standpoint.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I'm in the DMV now as well and I know a few people here who, like myself, used to live in Atlanta. Within the past year or so, I've known of a couple of people who have moved from the DMV to Atlanta which makes sense given the timing of Atlanta's economic recovery, which has lagged.
Yeah, I currently live in the DMV area and I moved from Atlanta due to the crappy job market at the time and hyper-competitiveness of even the most menial jobs. I got much faster responses and better opportunities ever since I moved here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
I've had co-workers transfer from DMV down to Atlanta within the past year. One actually came from Atlanta and then went back. A big part of it is the COL. One of my co-workers said the DMV COL is a big turn off for her on staying here long term and a couple months later, moved to Atlanta.

The COL is insane. I make a great salary here, but I'm still counting my coins. I was thinking how much more my dollars would go if I were back in ATL or down in Texas. I don't know how in the hell families manage here. I'm single and childless, so I can only imagine what its like for people who have to raise kids here in the DMV.

Quote:
Dallas is increasingly becoming to the Great Plains what Chicago is to the Great Lakes. This will become more apparent as the Great Plains actually begins developing larger population centers, as the ones currently, are all much too small (I.E. Omaha, Kansas City, Tulsa, Oklahoma City, Des Moines, Wichita, so on and so forth). That will change in the future, all of these areas will get much bigger. The Great Plains is the fastest growing area in the Midwestern United States in recent decades.

The Dallas side of the Metroplex has a real chance of following in Chicago's shoes from both a demographical, infrastructural, economical, and logistical perspective. I see a lot of overlaps between the two. The Fort Worth side of the Metroplex, of course, is a different animal altogether than Dallas or Chicago.
I could easily see Dallas having more of a Great Plains identity or a hybrid Great Plains/Southern identity/culture rather than a pure Southern one as it traditionally has over the years. Or its going to be more of a "border city" between regions much like how DC has gone from a quasi-Southern identity over the years to a Mid-Atlantic one with people debating if its a part of the Northeast culturally to this day. Fort Worth has a distinctive Texan identity all its own, so I don't think it will have the changes that Dallas has experienced, but will be affected due to the overall growth in the Metroplex.

I'm considering a move to the DFW area in the future, but there are some factors from a cultural and personal standpoint that give me pause, but that's a post for another day...

Last edited by biscuit_head; 06-28-2016 at 01:22 PM..
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Old 06-28-2016, 02:24 PM
 
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This is some great info in this thread.
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Old 06-28-2016, 02:27 PM
 
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It's interesting that DFW is becoming the center of the Great Plains.


I'm still sticking with Houston being the epicenter of the Gulf Coast. Blacks from Louisiana will continue to flock here. I'd read an article on Sunday about black people's from Louisiana ties with Houston, which dates back to the late 1800s.
http://www.houstonchronicle.com/loca...te-6692480.php
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Old 06-28-2016, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
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Each city that is considered "Big 4 in the South" [Atlanta-Dallas-Houston-Miami] has its own vast and expansive regional territory to claim being the "hub" of (rightfully so, in my personal opinion):

http://www.christopherbelknap.com/wp...-America-7.jpg

Maps such as this one make a whole lot of sense to me when gauging culture, social aspects, economic ties, logistical function, location and topography, infrastructure, style of build, natural disaster threats, climate, vegetation, and so on and so forth. I also say this as someone with living experience in Austin, Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Miami, and Washington D.C. in the United States.
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Old 06-28-2016, 02:40 PM
 
Location: DMV Area
877 posts, read 478,345 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red John View Post
Each city that is considered "Big 4 in the South" [Atlanta-Dallas-Houston-Miami] has its own vast and expansive regional territory to claim being the "hub" of (rightfully so, in my personal opinion):

http://www.christopherbelknap.com/wp...-America-7.jpg
I'd redo that map a bit, particularly in the Southeast since I don't consider Memphis, Jackson, or Little Rock as part of the Piedmont Atlantic. Nashville has characteristics of the Piedmont Cities such as Charlotte, Atlanta, or Raleigh, but its not a Piedmont city either. It has more in common with Birmingham, Louisville, and the Upland South more than it does with Memphis or Little Rock. Jackson has elements of the Delta and the Gulf Coast, but belongs to neither region.

ETA Whoops, I just realized that was all the Southeast Manufacturing Belt. So in that case, carry on...lol
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Old 06-28-2016, 02:43 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuit_head View Post
I'd redo that map a bit, particularly in the Southeast since I don't consider Memphis, Jackson, or Little Rock as part of the Piedmont Atlantic. Nashville has characteristics of the Piedmont Cities such as Charlotte, Atlanta, or Raleigh, but its not a Piedmont city either. It has more in common with Birmingham, Louisville, and the Upland South more than it does with Memphis or Little Rock. Jackson has elements of the Delta and the Gulf Coast, but belongs to neither region.
Some of Birmingham is apart of the Piedmont.
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Old 06-28-2016, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuit_head View Post
I'd redo that map a bit, particularly in the Southeast since I don't consider Memphis, Jackson, or Little Rock as part of the Piedmont Atlantic. Nashville has characteristics of the Piedmont Cities such as Charlotte, Atlanta, or Raleigh, but its not a Piedmont city either. It has more in common with Birmingham, Louisville, and the Upland South more than it does with Memphis or Little Rock. Jackson has elements of the Delta and the Gulf Coast, but belongs to neither region.
Agreed. I'm with you there. There can definitely be some further divisions with those regions on the map.

Memphis and other cities along the Mississippi River Delta should be split off into their own region; the Mississippi River Delta region. The "Interior West" should be further divided to show the delineation between the Intermountain West (CO, UT, WY) and the Desert Southwest (AZ, NV, NM).

Austin and San Antonio, along with the areas of South Texas in the Rio Grande Valley should be broken off from the Great Plains as there's nothing Great Plains about them; those along with Fort Worth simply being "Texas".

I would also give Florida a different shade of color than the one they have, to show its distinction from the Southeast they labeled on the map; Florida is more or less its own bubble of culture and populated enough to be its own region, in my personal opinion.

Perhaps also split off the cities in Appalachia such as Knoxville and Pittsburgh and allow them to be their own sub-region as well; Appalachia.

Other than that, the map is not too bad. Along with the America 2050 map, it's a good breakdown of the sub-regions and territories that exist within the United States.
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Old 06-28-2016, 04:07 PM
 
3,008 posts, read 4,178,588 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wpipkins2 View Post
Madame CJ Walker started her empire in Pittsburgh's Hill District before moving to Indianapolis.
Madam j Walker & co was started in Indianapolis in 1910. A few years after that is when her big breakthrough came. Yes, she lived in Pbg from 1907 to 1910 moving there to expand her business she had in Denver which she eventually closed. Her empire known as madam C j Walker was founded in Indy which she ran and had manufacturing operations while her daughter ran aelelia or however you spell it in Pittsburgh.

She gained her knowledge of hair in stl, eventually went out on her own in Denver and Pitt and her dynasty in Indy. 1st self made female millionaire of any race. Remarkable woman yet rarely mentioned in history books.

Her mentor ended up being her largest rival, yet we hear nothing about Annie Malone.
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