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Old 08-02-2016, 06:42 AM
 
9,583 posts, read 10,917,416 times
Reputation: 2109

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Yeah, you *perfectly* exhibit that DC snobbishness that is so despised. Your perspective is so limited and one-dimensional that it's not even worth going any further here, although I could easily tear this shreds if I so desired.
You know what, you have pissed me off because this is even more of a reminder why this whole issue of cheaper cost of living is only setting the black community back even farther.

I'm going to give you a real estate 101 lesson:


African American's moved to northern cities during the black migration which caused white flight to occur followed by black flight too of the black middle and upper class. Fast forward 60 years, people of all races with disposable income are returning to the city. Black people living in the city have now been put into a very unique position. We are sitting on million's of dollars of equity in our homes that could have single handily changed the trajectory of the black race. Instead of keeping our homes in the city, using some of the equity to rent them out, we just flat out sold them at the lowest prices imaginable prior to the renovation equity bump people get and moved south for a cheaper cost of living losing out on million's of dollars in net worth.

We buy the biggest cheapest house we can with vinyl siding that won't be worth anything in 30 years because of its lack of architecture and cheap materials, and yet, we don't realize that things get expensive because of demand. We should be running to expensive neighborhoods and expensive cities which many of us can afford, but we're cheap, to build our net-worth. We used to be aware that real estate is the easiest way to build net-worth, but the one caveat to that is that it must be located in an area with demand. All these Black people have moved down south to cheaper neighborhoods and many of them were sitting on millions, but a lack of education once again has set our entire race back again. We aren't buying in the center of the city where demand will be high in these southern cities, no, we're buying in the suburbs which are a few years from the ghetto living in cheap large houses.

If someone wants a slower pace of life or even cheaper cost of living, that's fine; however, keep the assets with the highest yield. It's a shame we, as a people, have not been educated on this simple economic fact and other races are knocking each other over to get in at a low cost and make a fortune while doing it. We owned the freaking property people!!!! It's this mindset of getting as much as possible for little to nothing that is holding us back from economic prosperity.

This is really not our fault though. We lived in the city when it wasn't a nice place to live and saw people in the suburbs living a nice life. As soon as we got the chance to go try their lifestyle, we took it. The problem is, the joke is on us. We always seem to be a day late and a dollar short. We are moving to the suburbs like it's the new thing to do as other races are moving back into the city because the suburb thing is old now and came with a completely different set of unforeseen problems. They are seeing their property values rise while we are underwater all across the country including in D.C. Black suburbs like PG county. Well surprise people! If people aren't willing to come and over pay for property like they do in the city, how do you expect to get your property value back? The people trying to buy your house are looking for cheap housing. Hello....

We had a chance to change the trajectory because we had something that was coveted by those with money which finally gave us the power and upper hand. And what did we do with it? We failed miserably and instead of vastly increasing our wealth, we have traded it in for something that will have no demand in the future. Cheap suburban and exurban homes. SMH....you will see what I mean in 20 years and we will be having the same conversation's of the past. Ghetto suburban neighborhoods with falling property values, but hey, cheaper cost of living.

Last edited by MDAllstar; 08-02-2016 at 06:50 AM..
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Old 08-02-2016, 07:05 AM
 
27,725 posts, read 24,748,456 times
Reputation: 16450
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
You know what, you have pissed me off because this is even more of a reminder why this whole issue of cheaper cost of living is only setting the black community back even farther.

I'm going to give you a real estate 101 lesson:


African American's moved to northern cities during the black migration which caused white flight to occur followed by black flight too of the black middle and upper class. Fast forward 60 years, people of all races with disposable income are returning to the city. Black people living in the city have now been put into a very unique position. We are sitting on million's of dollars of equity in our homes that could have single handily changed the trajectory of the black race. Instead of keeping our homes in the city, using some of the equity to rent them out, we just flat out sold them at the lowest prices imaginable prior to the renovation equity bump people get and moved south for a cheaper cost of living losing out on million's of dollars in net worth.

We buy the biggest cheapest house we can with vinyl siding that won't be worth anything in 30 years because of its lack of architecture and cheap materials, and yet, we don't realize that things get expensive because of demand. We should be running to expensive neighborhoods and expensive cities which many of us can afford, but we're cheap, to build our net-worth. We used to be aware that real estate is the easiest way to build net-worth, but the one caveat to that is that it must be located in an area with demand. All these Black people have moved down south to cheaper neighborhoods and many of them were sitting on millions, but a lack of education once again has set our entire race back again. We aren't buying in the center of the city where demand will be high in these southern cities, no, we're buying in the suburbs which are a few years from the ghetto living in cheap large houses.

If someone wants a slower pace of life or even cheaper cost of living, that's fine; however, keep the assets with the highest yield. It's a shame we, as a people, have not been educated on this simple economic fact and other races are knocking each other over to get in at a low cost and make a fortune while doing it. We owned the freaking property people!!!! It's this mindset of getting as much as possible for little to nothing that is holding us back from economic prosperity.

This is really not our fault though. We lived in the city when it wasn't a nice place to live and saw people in the suburbs living a nice life. As soon as we got the chance to go try their lifestyle, we took it. The problem is, the joke is on us. We always seem to be a day late and a dollar short. We are moving to the suburbs like it's the new thing to do as other races are moving back into the city because the suburb thing is old now and came with a completely different set of unforeseen problems. They are seeing their property values rise while we are underwater all across the country including in D.C. Black suburbs like PG county. Well surprise people! If people aren't willing to come and over pay for property like they do in the city, how do you expect to get your property value back? The people trying to buy your house are looking for cheap housing. Hello....

We had a chance to change the trajectory because we had something that was coveted by those with money which finally gave us the power and upper hand. And what did we do with it? We failed miserably and instead of vastly increasing our wealth, we have traded it in for something that will have no demand in the future. Cheap suburban and exurban homes. SMH....you will see what I mean in 20 years and we will be having the same conversation's of the past. Ghetto suburban neighborhoods with falling property values, but hey, cheaper cost of living.
I didn't even read past the first two sentences of this post. You're not in much of a position to school anybody about anything dude and this superiority complex you have based on where you live is just sickening.
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Old 08-02-2016, 07:08 AM
 
27,725 posts, read 24,748,456 times
Reputation: 16450
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
Well, you agreed with the only claim I have made in this entire thread which was that Atlanta attracts a more diverse group of Black people. Now, if you are one of those black people that think other Black people who do well for themselves should apologize about it, then "you" and people like you are the biggest problem facing black people today. Our race is so far behind other races it's sickening and here you go telling people they should not be proud of their accomplishments.

Not one single time have I made one comment saying anything negative about people who don't have a college degree, masters degrees, or whatever. Not one time have I made one negative comment about people who work in the service industry. I simply made an observation based on cost of living and education statistics. My goal is to help black people make a better life for themselves in life. What is your goal in life? Many of us weren't born into the best families and didn't have the opportunity that others have. Very few of us, with probably you included, are doing anything to help our people catch up to other races that didn't face the issues we have faced in America over the last 400 years.

I feel sorry for Black people like you that have the nerve to call other Black people names and make claims, yet are doing nothing meaningful to change the lives of their own people on a daily basis. A culture of jealousy and envy has been bred into our existence as a people from slavery and it's so sad to still see it everyday like in this discussion. Other races are proud of people in their race who are accomplished. Black people say things like you just said. Instead of trying to be accomplished and talking it up, we condemn it and turn it into a negative thing.

Black children who come from rich educated families in our community are trying to be as hood as possible so they can fit in with their peers and popular culture. Why? Because being ghetto is cool and going to school and earning money the legal way is not in our community. I feel sorry for you and everyone like you in our race. "You" represent the attitude people like me are fighting daily. Self sabotage and black hate! SMH.....
This is the most ridiculous thing I've ever read and anyone who's interacted with me for an extended period of time on this message board knows that you're so off-base until it isn't funny. This drivel isn't even worth responding to.
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Old 08-02-2016, 08:02 AM
 
52,622 posts, read 75,451,274 times
Reputation: 11627
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
In the Detroit area, you can find solidly middle and upper middle class Black folks in parts of Southfield, West Bloomfield, Farmington Hills and in the city in neighborhoods like Palmer Woods/Sherwood Forest/University District just south of 8 Mile and west of Woodward; as well as Rosedale Park/Grandmont-Rosedale on the outer West Side. There may be a few other areas as well.
You could also include parts of Oak Park, parts of Harper Woods, Lathrup Village, parts of the far SE corner neighborhoods of Redford and city neighborhoods such as Indian Village, parts of East English Village, parts of Boston-Edison and parts of the Parkland neighborhood in the far SW corner next to Dearborn Heights.
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Old 08-02-2016, 08:19 AM
 
12,202 posts, read 17,564,997 times
Reputation: 3350
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunion Powder View Post
It's a bit more of a big business oriented, live-to-work city than Dallas and Atlanta; not as stuffy as DC, but a tad less alternative than the other two.
Blame oil and gas. Lol.

I definitely see what you mean; this can be said for much of the South, which is the reason why so many blacks (and others) move down here.
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Old 08-02-2016, 08:43 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 3,807,303 times
Reputation: 4289
Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBoy205 View Post
Blame oil and gas. Lol.

I definitely see what you mean; this can be said for much of the South, which is the reason why so many blacks (and others) move down here.
If there was more rail Houstonians could atleast say they spend less time in traffic outside of work. That makes it a bit worse for me.
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Old 08-02-2016, 08:51 AM
 
27,725 posts, read 24,748,456 times
Reputation: 16450
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunion Powder View Post
If there was more rail Houstonians could atleast say they spend less time in traffic outside of work. That makes it a bit worse for me.
The up side is that Houston has a very robust freeway network and rail is expanding.
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Old 08-02-2016, 08:52 AM
 
12,202 posts, read 17,564,997 times
Reputation: 3350
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunion Powder View Post
If there was more rail Houstonians could atleast say they spend less time in traffic outside of work. That makes it a bit worse for me.
What's the difference between Houston's, Atlanta's, and Dallas's traffic, despite the last two having "more rail?"
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Old 08-02-2016, 09:04 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 3,807,303 times
Reputation: 4289
Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBoy205 View Post
What's the difference between Houston's, Atlanta's, and Dallas's traffic, despite the last two having "more rail?"
Dallas, in my experience, has more flowing traffic than the other two. Atlanta's problem is its underdeveloped road network and Houston's problem is having too many people in too small an area with few alternatives for getting around. That's how I see it.

Houston's daytime pop. swells a lot more.
Daytime Population Change due to Commuting: 2010 Census
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Old 08-02-2016, 09:22 AM
 
Location: DMV Area
860 posts, read 467,521 times
Reputation: 1563
Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBoy205 View Post
What's the difference between Houston's, Atlanta's, and Dallas's traffic, despite the last two having "more rail?"
For one thing, Houston has far higher Average Annual Daily Traffic (AADT) traffic counts on its freeways in contrast to Atlanta and Dallas/Ft. Worth. The busiest freeways in Texas are in the Houston area - the Southwest Freeway (US 59/I-69) has an AADT of 323,092 and Interstate 45 has an AADT of 310,662. These levels almost rival that of Los Angeles, Chicago, and NYC. The infamous 405 Freeway in Los Angeles has an AADT of 374,000 motorists, so Houston isn't too far behind.

DFW's busiest freeway is the Central Expressway/US-75 with an AADT of 304,620. Not that much different from the levels seen on Houston's freeways, but US-75 has a busy toll road parallel to it and 35E as well. Interstate 45 does too, but the Hardy Toll Road doesn't siphon traffic off I-45 the same way the DNT does. The second-busiest freeway in DFW is Stemmons Freeway/35E has an AADT of 258,324.

Georgia's busiest freeway is Interstate 75 in ATL with an AADT of 274,060. Atlanta has horrid traffic, but numbers-wise, it doesn't compare to the busiest freeways in Texas. I was pretty surprised when I read this. Even the infamous 285 has an AADT of "only" 261,220 according to the chart I linked.


Also, DFW's freeway and tollways are on more of a grid network, so there are more alternatives in the freeway network if something were to happen on one freeway or Tollway and DFW has a more robust arterial network of roads than Houston or (especially) Atlanta, so those can be effective alternatives to traffic on the freeways. The multinodal nature of the area also means that traffic is dispersed throughout the Metroplex and there are more employment centers scattered about the area. Besides Downtown Dallas, there is also Plano, Las Colinas, Downtown Ft. Worth, and DFW Airport to name a few.

Unlike the DFW area, Houston and Atlanta's freeways are on a hub-and-spoke network, so that affects how traffic moves around a lot more, since employment centers are a lot more concentrated in certain areas - Houston seems to have its employment centers concentrated on Downtown, Uptown, Medical Center, and the Energy Corridor. Inner Loop Houston is a lot more centralized than DFW in general. Atlanta is a bit more dispersed than Houston, but not as dispersed as DFW. Employment centers there are mostly Downtown, Midtown, Buckhead, Perimeter Center, Cumberland, Hartsfield-Jackson Airport, and Alpharetta, but these major employment centers are more or less along one corridor along 75/85, and 400.

MARTA's ridership is relatively high despite its limited coverage, but it connects Downtown, Midtown, Buckhead, Perimeter Center, and the Airport. So although it barely puts a dent in Atlanta's car traffic, it most certainly does help due to moving traffic between the airport and major employment centers and conventions/events.

Last edited by biscuit_head; 08-02-2016 at 09:40 AM..
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