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Old 09-02-2016, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,166 posts, read 26,101,727 times
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It's hard to take this kind of analysis seriously.

Quote:
The concentration of upper income Black households in these three neighboring states does not have a simple explanation. The federal government’s significant presence in the region certainly boosts incomes across the board. But other states with high levels of federal salary expenditures, such as West Virginia and Alabama, are not nearly as well off.
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Old 09-02-2016, 08:46 AM
 
29,685 posts, read 27,113,966 times
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Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
It's hard to take this kind of analysis seriously.
Yeah now THAT line had me scratching my head because there's clearly a huge difference between federal expenditures in the form of direct jobs/military spending and entitlement spending. That was pretty sloppy but the rest of the info I found somewhat interesting, especially the historical statistics.
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Old 09-02-2016, 09:39 AM
 
56,244 posts, read 80,390,973 times
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
But there's still a common floor when it comes to COL within metro areas, and all metro areas have those intraregional variances.
Exactly and there are other sites/resources that can show those differences between specific places in a metro.
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Old 09-02-2016, 09:55 AM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
4,469 posts, read 2,281,436 times
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Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
I think he/she means is there a large percentage of the total population of people in Boston that make up the black population of middle class people like in DC, ATL, and NYC?

We really should be using area median income (AMI) for this versus the $100,000 metric. D.C.'s AMI is $76,440. That is the number we should be using for middle class.
if i calculated my numbers correctly, this is what i come up with:

American FactFinder - Results
983018.665 middle class households in what the census considers to be metro boston (55.7 %)


American FactFinder - Results
49530 black middle class households in what the census considers to be metro boston (2.8 %)


not sure what it would be for the other cities.
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Old 09-02-2016, 10:26 AM
 
56,244 posts, read 80,390,973 times
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Originally Posted by stanley-88888888 View Post
^ unlike popular opinion its probably similar in proportion to nyc (but probably significantly lower than the other 2; especially atlanta).
If I'm not mistaken, the Black median household for both the NYC and Boston metro areas is roughly the same/similar. So, you may be right.
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Old 09-02-2016, 12:49 PM
 
9,830 posts, read 11,389,210 times
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
But there's still a common floor when it comes to COL within metro areas, and all metro areas have those intraregional variances.
True, but shouldn't an analysis for black households take their income and their cost of living relative to where they actually live? That's why you can't use metro area cost of living. You would have to use actual household cost of living relative to where they live.

It's kind of like people who say living in the city in DC proper is expensive, however, you can get an apartment in Ward 7 and 8 for $800-$1,000 per month which is where young, successful, educated black people are buying houses in droves. Now those houses are expensive, however, the rental market isn't.
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Old 09-02-2016, 01:03 PM
 
29,685 posts, read 27,113,966 times
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Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
True, but shouldn't an analysis for black households take their income and their cost of living relative to where they actually live? That's why you can't use metro area cost of living. You would have to use actual household cost of living relative to where they live.

It's kind of like people who say living in the city in DC proper is expensive, however, you can get an apartment in Ward 7 and 8 for $800-$1,000 per month which is where young, successful, educated black people are buying houses in droves. Now those houses are expensive, however, the rental market isn't.
You can't realistically do that for every single household, much less expect any sort of normalized data inclusive of such. It's simply not practical and borders on the impossible.

Again, every metro area has intraregional variance when it comes to housing prices/COL so that's pretty much a built-in constant.
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Old 09-02-2016, 01:31 PM
 
56,244 posts, read 80,390,973 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
True, but shouldn't an analysis for black households take their income and their cost of living relative to where they actually live? That's why you can't use metro area cost of living. You would have to use actual household cost of living relative to where they live.

It's kind of like people who say living in the city in DC proper is expensive, however, you can get an apartment in Ward 7 and 8 for $800-$1,000 per month which is where young, successful, educated black people are buying houses in droves. Now those houses are expensive, however, the rental market isn't.
Looking at the zip codes that cover Wards 7 and 8, the median household income for the 3 zip codes that cover that area is around $34-35,600(zip 20019 is $35,050, zip 20020 is $35,602 and zip 20032 is $34,060 according to 2010-2014 census info). So, that may explain the rent, but you have variance within those zip codes in terms of income as well.


From around Massachusetts Ave going south to around Alger Park has the highest median household incomes in terms of census tracts, with a couple around the national figure(northern Woodland) and one just south of Park Circle Park to Pennsylvania Ave(Penn Branch) having a median household income of $82,151.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 09-02-2016 at 01:40 PM..
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Old 09-02-2016, 01:42 PM
 
9,830 posts, read 11,389,210 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
You can't realistically do that for every single household, much less expect any sort of normalized data inclusive of such. It's simply not practical and borders on the impossible.

Again, every metro area has intraregional variance when it comes to housing prices/COL so that's pretty much a built-in constant.
True, but are they as wide as DC when it comes to median income and cost of living? Black people have substantially more disposable income because their income is so high, yet housing is so low. That's why I said it was flawed. That's all.
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Old 09-02-2016, 01:47 PM
 
9,830 posts, read 11,389,210 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Looking at the zip codes that cover Wards 7 and 8, the median household income for the 3 zip codes that cover that area is around $34-35,600(zip 20019 is $35,050, zip 20020 is $35,602 and zip 20032 is $34,060 according to 2010-2014 census info). So, that may explain the rent, but you have variance within those zip codes in terms of income as well.


From around Massachusetts Ave going south to around Alger Park has the highest median household incomes in terms of census tracts, with a couple around the national figure(northern Woodland) and one just south of Park Circle Park to Pennsylvania Ave(Penn Branch) having a median household income of $82,151.
That's why Bajan made a great point about middle income black people living in low income black neighborhoods. We tend to buy houses and are far outnumbered by those in apartments.
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