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Old 09-29-2015, 09:35 AM
 
27,758 posts, read 24,774,360 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Really? I think you had Black people from rural areas of Georgia still moving North after WW2. That is when many Midwestern and Northeastern cities saw their Black populations grow.
Correct. The reverse migration started in the 70's and was the first time a Southern city (Atlanta) registered the highest gains among Black domestic migrants.
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Old 09-29-2015, 09:41 AM
 
27,758 posts, read 24,774,360 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Most big salaries in high cost metros aren't that impressive after the COL adjustment. The median HHI for non-Hispanic Whites in the Bay Area is just over $100K, which translates to a $53K salary in Dallas. Is the average person in SF truly any better off?

The real benefits in living in of these high COL inure to the Top 10% of income earners. There aren't too many metros with industries that dish out $250,000+ bonuses on top of base, but if you're in one of those industries, the high COL of NYC or SF won't bother you much at all.
I'm thinking this is probably why DC's Black growth is slowing, even though it obviously has the strongest professional network and the most overall job opportunities for Blacks among high cost metros (or arguably among all metros).
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Old 09-29-2015, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,613 posts, read 24,808,715 times
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We also need to keep in mind how much Black poverty there is in many of these cities when looking at income figures.

Detroit - 31.4%
Chicago - 29.1%
Philadelphia - 25.8%
Miami - 25.3%
Los Angeles - 24.3%
Dallas - 22.5%
Bay Area - 22.3%
Atlanta - 22.0%
Boston - 21.5%
New York - 20.8%
Houston - 20.3%
Washington - 13.8%
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Old 09-29-2015, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
5,570 posts, read 5,366,856 times
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Speaking of cost of living the New York forum is always going on about the fact that $100,000 a year is not a lot on that area. That is a middle class income for that area. Would you take that into consideration when looking at it as a Black Mecca or that is not of any consequence because the opportunity is still there. Like, it may not be open for business like Atlanta was at one time but those that can compete would do better to be there.

I ask because it appears that most agree that the old manufacturing cities of the Rust Belt, DC for the governmental jobs, and Boston and Philadelphia for their contributions in the fight against slavery, abolition, among other reasons are great places for Blacks. Boston may be an issue because of indifference, xenophobia and assimilation issues, but Blacks have navigated those waters before.

Anyway, if a place is good for some Blacks that can take advantage of what a city can offer, but not necessarily all Blacks, as in they're not handing out Section 8 vouchers to everyone or lining people up to work in call centers. Are those areas still good? I think I already have my answer but I'm curious to see what people have to say.
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Old 09-29-2015, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,613 posts, read 24,808,715 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I'm thinking this is probably why DC's Black growth is slowing, even though it obviously has the strongest professional network and the most overall job opportunities for Blacks among high cost metros (or arguably among all metros).
Probably. DC has always struck me as a magnet for Black people who've already got quite a bit going on already. You're not getting the Southwest Philly "entrepreneur" with only a HS degree who moves down there looking to strike it big. You're also not going to get that retired couple from New Jersey who've put two kids through college and want more bang for their buck in a different city. It still draws middle-class Blacks looking to raise families but obviously not as many as cheaper metros.
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Old 09-29-2015, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,613 posts, read 24,808,715 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
Speaking of cost of living the New York forum is always going on about the fact that $100,000 a year is not a lot on that area. That is a middle class income for that area. Would you take that into consideration when looking at it as a Black Mecca or that is not of any consequence because the opportunity is still there.
I think we should take everything into consideration.

New York, imo, is the best city if you're young, Black and have a good-paying job ($90K and above). It has the highest concentration of Black professionals in an urban context (as the stats I provided earlier show) and more Black-owned and focused bars, restaurants, coffee shops and clubs than anywhere else. So from that perspective, it's great. The problem is that the middle class isn't as strong as it is in DC, Atlanta, Houston or Dallas and the Black underclass is huge. You also don't have the Dekalb-PG County equivalent here, so your options are more limited if living in a nice, middle-to-upper middle class Black neighborhood is your thing.

DC seems to be the best rounded. I'm not crazy about the social options there, as gentrification has seemed to erode much of the Black scene in the central city, but the stats don't lie.

Atlanta, Dallas and Houston aren't as economically dynamic as the DC area. But they offer a lower COL, which provides some relief to middle-class families to working-class families.
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Old 09-29-2015, 10:24 AM
 
Location: The Brazos River runs thru it.
1,770 posts, read 3,566,867 times
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Ill take Houston for 500 alex.
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Old 09-29-2015, 10:44 AM
 
Location: ITP - City of Atlanta Proper
7,797 posts, read 11,731,309 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Really? I think you had Black people from rural areas of Georgia still moving North after WW2. That is when many Midwestern and Northeastern cities saw their Black populations grow.
People were still moving from rural areas in the period after the war, but when it comes to Georgia, more and more of those people were settling in Atlanta. It was a however a trickle compared to what was to come in the 1970s forward, however as these illustration shows, Atlanta was one of the few Southern cities during that time period to gain Black population:

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Old 09-29-2015, 10:46 AM
 
52,659 posts, read 75,502,369 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
Speaking of cost of living the New York forum is always going on about the fact that $100,000 a year is not a lot on that area. That is a middle class income for that area. Would you take that into consideration when looking at it as a Black Mecca or that is not of any consequence because the opportunity is still there. Like, it may not be open for business like Atlanta was at one time but those that can compete would do better to be there.

I ask because it appears that most agree that the old manufacturing cities of the Rust Belt, DC for the governmental jobs, and Boston and Philadelphia for their contributions in the fight against slavery, abolition, among other reasons are great places for Blacks. Boston may be an issue because of indifference, xenophobia and assimilation issues, but Blacks have navigated those waters before.

Anyway, if a place is good for some Blacks that can take advantage of what a city can offer, but not necessarily all Blacks, as in they're not handing out Section 8 vouchers to everyone or lining people up to work in call centers. Are those areas still good? I think I already have my answer but I'm curious to see what people have to say.
Keep in mind that the median household income in the NYC metro is about $66,000. You have to take the influx of immigrants into account as for why the figure isn't higher, but $100,000 is almost double the national figure of $53,046(09-13 info). I don't think the COL in the area is double the national figure/average.

As for mostly Black middle class areas with good schools in the NYC area, Lakeview(Malverne Schools), NW Freeport/northern Baldwin(Baldwin schools), Wheatley Heights(Half Hollow Hills schools), northern West Babylon(Belmont Park area)(North Babylon schools), the southern end of the Valhalla school district, parts of Elmont, parts of the Valley Stream area and perhaps specific parts of the Nyack SD are some in the NY portion of the NYC metro that come to mind. There are others I may have forgotten about as well. You may find the thread in this post valuable in regards to the NY portion of the NYC metro: http://www.city-data.com/forum/41219160-post82.html

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 09-29-2015 at 11:13 AM..
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Old 09-29-2015, 10:55 AM
 
52,659 posts, read 75,502,369 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by waronxmas View Post
People were still moving from rural areas in the period after the war, but when it comes to Georgia, more and more of those people were settling in Atlanta. It was a however a trickle compared to what was to come in the 1970s forward, however as these illustration shows, Atlanta was one of the few Southern cities during that time period to gain Black population:
I know this, but post WW2 saw Black migration from all over the South to Northern/Western cities. My parents didn't get to NY until the early/mid 60's, as an example. I had a paternal great grandmother that was in NY in the early 1920's, but that was it when looking at both sides of the family.
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