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Old 09-29-2015, 06:49 PM
 
52,631 posts, read 75,477,928 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Yes, but very few of these cities had Black communities to transition to a professional, white-collar job base either due to desegregation or deindustrialization.
Can't forget Urban Renewal, as all of these neighborhoods were destroyed or became a shell of its former self because of it.

A lot of the white collar folks even in DC and Atlanta aren't in the original urban neighborhoods as well. So, in Chicago, those white collar folks may be in Olympia Fields, the Beverly neighborhood, parts of South Holland, Oak Park, Evanston, etc. In Pittsburgh, they may have moved to Wilkinsburg(in the past, but Blackridge neighborhood is still middle class), Penn Hills, parts of the Woodland Hills SD or parts of the East Side. In Detroit, said folks may be in Palmer Woods, Sherwood Forest, the University District, Grandmont-Rosedale and parts of Boston-Edison in the city and Southfield/Lathrup Village, parts of Farmington Hills, parts of West Bloomfield, parts of the Grosse Pointes and parts of Oak Park.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 09-29-2015 at 07:14 PM..
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Old 09-29-2015, 07:07 PM
 
27,749 posts, read 24,748,456 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Can't forget Urban Renewal, as all of these neighborhoods were destroyed or became a shell of its former self because of it.
Yes, absolutely.

Quote:
A lot of the white collar folks even in DC and Atlanta aren't in the original urban neighborhoods as well. So, in Chicago, those white collar folks may be in Olympia Fields, the Beverly neighborhood, parts of South Holland, Oak Park, Evanston, etc. In Pittsburgh, they may have moved to Wilkinsburg(in the past), Penn Hills or parts of the East Side. In Detroit, said folks may be in Palmer Woods, Sherwood Forest, the University District, Grandmont-Rosedale and parts of Boston-Edison in the city and Southfield/Lathrup Village, parts of Farmington Hills, parts of West Bloomfield, parts of the Grosse Pointes and parts of Oak Park.
Yep...that would be a function of desegregation and, more recently, gentrification.
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Old 09-29-2015, 09:20 PM
 
Location: Silver Spring,MD Orlando,Fl
639 posts, read 1,047,570 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Black Median Household Income (benchmarked against Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX MSA)

Washington - $42,369
Houston - $41,414
Atlanta - $41,185
Dallas - $40,864
New York - $32,634
Miami - 30,954
Detroit - $30,870
Philadelphia - $28,824
Chicago - $28,798
Boston - $28,172
Los Angeles - $27,926
San Francisco - $23,740

Once you strip away the COL differential, there really isn't much difference among the Top 4. There's a significant drop off between these four and the NYC metro. As you can see, a high salary in the Bay Area does not mean you are necessarily any better off than someone with a nominally smaller salary in Dallas. A Black person in the Bay Area needs to make $76,124 to have an equivalent standard of living as the median Black person in Dallas.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
We also need to keep in mind how much Black poverty there is in many of these cities when looking at income figures.

Detroit - 31.4%
Chicago - 29.1%
Philadelphia - 25.8%
Miami - 25.3%
Los Angeles - 24.3%
Dallas - 22.5%
Bay Area - 22.3%
Atlanta - 22.0%
Boston - 21.5%
New York - 20.8%
Houston - 20.3%
Washington - 13.8%
Bajan Yankee these numbers are great. Washington DC is really a powerhouse. But seeing the Data visually is really amazing. The poverty rate is 7 percent lower than the next closest metro.

I think the numbers are reflecting where people are moving to. A lot of americans are moving to the Sun-belt cities.......the combination of lower cost of living and better winter weather and less taxes is hard ot beat. Cities like Atlanta, Houston and Dallas will continue to grow.
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Old 09-29-2015, 11:54 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles,CA & Scottsdale, AZ
1,899 posts, read 1,513,395 times
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So some people have been saying that New York city is not considered a black mecca because it is only 25 percent black. BUT it is 28 percent hispanic and of that 28 percent around 9 percent is dominican and the majority of the dominicans in NY are black or mixed race(for example when I was in the bronx my family from DC and I literally thought everyone was African American and or mixed until I heard them speak spanish). so you could look at it as saying NYC is over 35 percent of black(note I said of, not full) descent(we also should include those of puerto rican descent who are of mixed race). This makes New York an extreme mecca for people of Black blood because unlike ATL you have Black Americans who are of slave ancestry, of African ancestry, or Caribbean ancestry, who identify as Hispanic, who identify as mixed race, so on and so forth. You have such a mixed bowl of people who have black blood in them that speak all different languages and dominate all different parts of the city. On top of this I heard that New York area has some of the wealthiest African American communities in the country, some of the best black radio stations, a black presence in their corporate and academic world, ect. so that's why I think NYC should be a serious contender in this, ahead of other cities i've seen being mentioned on here such as Houston, Miami, and probably even Chicago.
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Old 09-30-2015, 12:23 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
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^^You can also say the same of Miami with its large Afro-Latino, West Indian and Haitian population, honestly.
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Old 09-30-2015, 12:58 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles,CA & Scottsdale, AZ
1,899 posts, read 1,513,395 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by qworldorder View Post
^^You can also say the same of Miami with its large Afro-Latino, West Indian and Haitian population, honestly.
Yup I totally agree, and people do say that about miami, except Miami lacks the African immigrants NYC has. Due to immigration their black population is increasing rapidly also.
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Old 09-30-2015, 06:40 AM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 29,790,408 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I also happen to believe this is a big reason for much of the underlying racial tension still present in the Atlanta area.
Yep, I remember I made a remark when Atlanta was being polled as being one of the most ghetto cities.

I was like really???

Meanwhile you got people running around San Francisco acting a fool, but you know how that goes. When a certain group of people exhibit abnormal behavior it's "edgy".
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Old 09-30-2015, 07:37 AM
 
52,631 posts, read 75,477,928 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by afdinatl View Post
That's actually sad
Yeah and here is another way of looking at this: Here are the most and least expensive cities to live in
http://online.wsj.com/public/resourc...s/download.pdf

U.S. Median Black Household Income Metro Area Rank Based on ACS 2008-2012 data*

You have to consider things such as: immigration, social services, education(attainment), mobility and skills, among other factors.

Here is an interesting article about mobility: http://mobile.nytimes.com/2013/07/22...&_r=1&referer=

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 09-30-2015 at 08:13 AM..
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Old 09-30-2015, 07:42 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,611 posts, read 24,793,924 times
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Updated tally for Black or African American in professional/creative class occupations.

New York - 76,425 (5.3%)
Washington - 63,280 (9.0%)
Atlanta - 45,125 (6.1%)
Chicago - 32,815 (5.3%)
Los Angeles - 29,610 (7.8%)
Houston - 22,349 (5.2%)
Dallas - 22,160 (5.6%)
Philadelphia - 21,415 (4.5%)
Miami - 18,400 (3.8%)
Detroit - 15,824 (4.7%)
Bay Area - 13,667 (8.1%)
Boston - 9,514 (6.4%)
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Old 09-30-2015, 07:46 AM
 
Location: ITP - City of Atlanta Proper
7,794 posts, read 11,727,152 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Yes, but very few of these cities had Black communities to transition to a professional, white-collar job base either due to desegregation or deindustrialization.
Yup. And this all ties back to the influence of HBCUs in those respective cities. DC and Atlanta transitioned so quickly not only because they had a large number of educated professionals living there, but because those professionals were connected to a network through the universities. Even to this day, all roads in the black community lead back to Howard in DC and Spelman/Morehouse/Clark/Morris Brown in Atlanta.
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