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Old 10-01-2015, 10:12 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,272 posts, read 26,286,355 times
Reputation: 11734

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I don't completely agree with that but I understand your reasoning. The legacy Black meccas still have some advantages that aren't easily duplicated in other cities.
The biggest advantage cities like Philadelphia and Detroit have over cities like Dallas is entrenched Black political machine power. They feel "Blacker" in that sense even if that political power hasn't translated into much economic power. It's the lack of economic opportunity and power in cities like Detroit that will eventually lead to an erosion of some of that political power.

So I'd say it starts at the economic level. For me, the most important thing is that Black people are doing well, relatively speaking. That's more important to me than being able to say that there's a Black face in power. So that's why my proposed formula would weigh that factor a bit more heavily. Then I'd put the second most weight on the political.

Under that type of analysis, a city like Dallas would probably rank ahead of Philadelphia. The Bay Area, on the other hand, wouldn't.
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Old 10-01-2015, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,272 posts, read 26,286,355 times
Reputation: 11734
Quote:
Originally Posted by UKWildcat1981 View Post
NYC has been a mecca for Jewish, Italians, Irish, Middle Easterners and black people, its the biggest city in the USA so it has a higher chance for a more educated black population.
It has a higher chance of having more educated Black people (and it does). But the Black people here aren't more educated. That's partly due to there being so many immigrants in the region but it is what it is.
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Old 10-01-2015, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,272 posts, read 26,286,355 times
Reputation: 11734
Black or African American Without Health Insurance by MSA

New York - 361,457 (10.7%)
Atlanta - 314,951 (17.0%)
Miami - 287,889 (23.0%)
Chicago - 196,788 (12.5%)
Houston - 176,071 (15.6%)
Dallas - 172,633 (16.6%)
Philadelphia - 140,804 (11.4%)
Washington - 124,277 (8.3%)
Detroit - 115,010 (12.1%)
Los Angeles - 95,585 (11.0%)
Bay Area - 31,396 (8.0%)
Boston* - 22,669 (6.4%)

*Mitt Romney did at least one thing right.
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Old 10-01-2015, 11:08 AM
 
56,750 posts, read 81,082,761 times
Reputation: 12550
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
The biggest advantage cities like Philadelphia and Detroit have over cities like Dallas is entrenched Black political machine power. They feel "Blacker" in that sense even if that political power hasn't translated into much economic power. It's the lack of economic opportunity and power in cities like Detroit that will eventually lead to an erosion of some of that political power.

So I'd say it starts at the economic level. For me, the most important thing is that Black people are doing well, relatively speaking. That's more important to me than being able to say that there's a Black face in power. So that's why my proposed formula would weigh that factor a bit more heavily. Then I'd put the second most weight on the political.

Under that type of analysis, a city like Dallas would probably rank ahead of Philadelphia. The Bay Area, on the other hand, wouldn't.
So, where does an area like Columbus OH, which has evidence of both, stand?

I think what could hurt Detroit and Philly is if Black people aren't involved in any positive economic change.
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Old 10-01-2015, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
13,403 posts, read 21,226,501 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
The biggest advantage cities like Philadelphia and Detroit have over cities like Dallas is entrenched Black political machine power. They feel "Blacker" in that sense even if that political power hasn't translated into much economic power. It's the lack of economic opportunity and power in cities like Detroit that will eventually lead to an erosion of some of that political power.

So I'd say it starts at the economic level. For me, the most important thing is that Black people are doing well, relatively speaking. That's more important to me than being able to say that there's a Black face in power. So that's why my proposed formula would weigh that factor a bit more heavily. Then I'd put the second most weight on the political.

Under that type of analysis, a city like Dallas would probably rank ahead of Philadelphia. The Bay Area, on the other hand, wouldn't.
Well, Dallas has had Black mayors, city managers, the president of DISD is black, and the police chief is black among other things.

Granted Blacks havent had power as long as Detroit and Philly have, but blacks are pretty empowered in Dallas.
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Old 10-01-2015, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,272 posts, read 26,286,355 times
Reputation: 11734
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
So, where does an area like Columbus OH, which has evidence of both, stand?
I don't know. More would go into my "economic" metric than simply median income. Income alone is too narrow a way to look at it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
"Economic" may be the easiest in some ways. Median income/wages would be one factor though this needs to be normalized to account for disparities in cost of living. I'd say this should account for 15% of the score in this category. The % of Blacks living in poverty should also be considered, accounting for maybe 10% of the score. I place the most weight on the size of a city's Black professional class relative to the Black workforce. In other words, I think a city whose Black population skews more towards creative class professions (i.e., scientists, writers, etc.) should be rewarded more than a city whose Black population skews more towards retail and lower service class positions. Let's say this accounts for 55% of the score in this category. The remaining 20% could relate to the number of Black-owned companies (which we can get from Black Enterprise).
I haven't exactly figured this out, but I am pretty sure I want to penalize cities that (1) have a high % of Black poverty and (2) have a Black workforce that is heavily skewed towards low-level occupations (janitors, fast food, retail, etc.). 32% of the Black people in Metro Columbus, for example, live below the poverty line. That's an important fact to take into account.
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Old 10-01-2015, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,272 posts, read 26,286,355 times
Reputation: 11734
Perhaps I'd give a little extra weight to this metric.

Black Executive/Senior Level Officials and Managers by MSA

New York - 3,855
Washington - 2,950
Atlanta - 2,290
Los Angeles - 2,155
Chicago - 1,900
Miami - 1,500
Philadelphia - 1,090
Bay Area - 1,030
Dallas - 1,050
Detroit - 755
Houston - 745
Boston - 340

"You ain't no boss!"


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iQkhpw5FZac
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Old 10-01-2015, 12:58 PM
 
29,950 posts, read 27,450,839 times
Reputation: 18547
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
The biggest advantage cities like Philadelphia and Detroit have over cities like Dallas is entrenched Black political machine power. They feel "Blacker" in that sense even if that political power hasn't translated into much economic power. It's the lack of economic opportunity and power in cities like Detroit that will eventually lead to an erosion of some of that political power.

So I'd say it starts at the economic level. For me, the most important thing is that Black people are doing well, relatively speaking. That's more important to me than being able to say that there's a Black face in power. So that's why my proposed formula would weigh that factor a bit more heavily. Then I'd put the second most weight on the political.

Under that type of analysis, a city like Dallas would probably rank ahead of Philadelphia. The Bay Area, on the other hand, wouldn't.
I understand what you're saying, but I think that's more of a function of geoeconomic trends than anything (Northern post-industrial economies versus Sunbelt service sector economies). Also, blue collar professions in the North are a bit different than in the South due to the presence of unions/absence of right-to-work laws.

It's easy to quantify the economic data, but not so much the sociocultural factors which is what makes this exercise interesting and not an exact science.

Does your ranking change at all in light of the data you've presented?
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Old 10-01-2015, 01:06 PM
 
29,950 posts, read 27,450,839 times
Reputation: 18547
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Black or African American Without Health Insurance by MSA

New York - 361,457 (10.7%)
Atlanta - 314,951 (17.0%)
Miami - 287,889 (23.0%)
Chicago - 196,788 (12.5%)
Houston - 176,071 (15.6%)
Dallas - 172,633 (16.6%)
Philadelphia - 140,804 (11.4%)
Washington - 124,277 (8.3%)
Detroit - 115,010 (12.1%)
Los Angeles - 95,585 (11.0%)
Bay Area - 31,396 (8.0%)
Boston* - 22,669 (6.4%)

*Mitt Romney did at least one thing right.
I think Atlanta's high number is a combination of folks in the lower socioeconomic stratum and the high number of business owners, many of whom opt not to have health insurance because it's too expensive and it remains to be seen how the ACA will impact these figures, particularly in Southern states that are hostile to the legislation.
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Old 10-01-2015, 01:09 PM
 
Location: Silver Spring,MD Orlando,Fl
640 posts, read 1,091,472 times
Reputation: 416
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Black or African Americans with Earnings of $100,000 or more in the Past 12 Months

New York - 84,981 (3.2%)
Washington - 79,982 (6.9%)
Atlanta - 33,529 (2.6%)
Los Angeles - 27,225 (3.8%)
Chicago - 26,900 (2.2%)
Houston - 23,538 (3.0%)
Philadelphia - 20,405 (2.1%)
Dallas - 18,113 (2.5%)
Bay Area - 16,328 (5.0%)
Detroit - 12,790 (1.7%)
Miami - 12,045 (1.3%)
Boston - 7,774 (2.9%)
WOW another amazing Stat for DC twice as many as Atlanta and Los Angeles but they are similar sized cities population-wise. Is this stat for individuals or households??

Last edited by Aimewitue; 10-01-2015 at 01:33 PM..
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