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Old 10-01-2015, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,269 posts, read 26,269,309 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I'm not talking about just median household income, but in terms of a quite visible business presence and political presence. It doesn't hurt that it is home to the biggest university in the country and has 2 HBCU's nearby.
I don't know how it would rank because I haven't looked at all of the data. I started out focusing on the creative class cities.

Again, I think the economic profile of the region's Black community matters more than anything. Is a 35% poverty rate ever a good thing? Is it a good thing when only 1.0% of Blacks are in creative class professions while the remainder take up jobs at Finish Line, McDonald's, or better yet, can't find a job at all? I mean, that's the reality in a place like Milwaukee.

I suppose a city would get some credit for having an HBCU, but I wouldn't necessarily say that that should be a factor that catapults it up the rankings. And while I'm interested in the political, I'm thinking more on a regional level, not just at the municipal/core city level. In other words, there's a distinction to be made between political control in Atlanta and its outlying suburban counties and Black political control that only exists in the city of Reading.
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Old 10-01-2015, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,269 posts, read 26,269,309 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Truthfully, I think most of the cultural stuff you can find in most cities with a sizable Black population, but it's just a matter of quantity for the most part--unless we're defining "cultural stuff" differently.
See, I guess this is where my Black bourgieness comes in. I remember going to a "soiree" (wasn't that fancy but can't think of a better word at the moment) in DC and meeting a girl from New Orleans. I asked her why she decided to move to DC (a predictable question, I know) and her response was "Because we don't have this in New Orleans." That didn't really register at the time, but after thinking back on it, I guess one would be hard-pressed to find a room with 500 Black people under the age of 30 with college degrees.

And yeah, the quantity definitely matters. The type of Black event you can find in NYC every weekend probably happens in Boston once every fiscal quarter.
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Old 10-01-2015, 03:00 PM
 
12,356 posts, read 18,242,137 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
That's somewhat hard to see, given the sheer difference in numbers and the fact that Atlanta is huge Black LGBT magnet as well (which constitutes a subset of nightlife).
Well, I'm speaking from a straight side, even though black gays are taking over The Galleria. Lol. No shade though.

Houston has a great black social scene and nightlife compared to its black numbers. Trust me, nightlife in Atlanta and Houston for blacks are neck-in-neck. Numbers don't mean nothing because folks love to tout Atlanta's horn when it's compared to NYC's nightlife, and we all know that NYC's black population is twice the size of Atlanta's. Atlanta and Houston are closer in number than they are to NYC. So, let's not go there, buddy.

You know we're cool now. Lol.
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Old 10-01-2015, 03:06 PM
 
56,708 posts, read 81,038,544 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I don't know how it would rank because I haven't looked at all of the data. I started out focusing on the creative class cities.

Again, I think the economic profile of the region's Black community matters more than anything. Is a 35% poverty rate ever a good thing? Is it a good thing when only 1.0% of Blacks are in creative class professions while the remainder take up jobs at Finish Line, McDonald's, or better yet, can't find a job at all? I mean, that's the reality in a place like Milwaukee.

I suppose a city would get some credit for having an HBCU, but I wouldn't necessarily say that that should be a factor that catapults it up the rankings. And while I'm interested in the political, I'm thinking more on a regional level, not just at the municipal/core city level. In other words, there's a distinction to be made between political control in Atlanta and its outlying suburban counties and Black political control that only exists in the city of Reading.
I would suggest looking at Columbus then. It isn't a Northern city with a large blue collar past. So, I wouldn't be quick to assume that all major Northern cities were blue collar in character.

Another thing I'm curious about is (Pre)K-12 schooling. While I know about Malverne Schools on Long Island in the NYC area being a predominately Black district in terms of enrollment with solid test scores and a high graduation rate, what are some other examples in other areas? Baldwin is a nearby school district that has an enrollment that is pluralistically more Black, that also has solid test scores and a high grad rate. It isn't going to be just about professionals and single folks, but families have to be considered as well. I'm just saying this in a general sense, by the way.

Some Malverne and Baldwin school info: 2014 | MALVERNE UFSD - Enrollment Data | New York State Education Department Data Site
2014 | MALVERNE UFSD - Graduation Rate | New York State Education Department Data Site

2014 | BALDWIN UFSD - Enrollment Data | New York State Education Department Data Site
2014 | BALDWIN UFSD - Graduation Rate | New York State Education Department Data Site

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 10-01-2015 at 03:28 PM..
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Old 10-01-2015, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,269 posts, read 26,269,309 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I would suggest looking at Columbus then. It isn't a Northern city with a large blue collar past. So, I wouldn't be quick to assume that all major Northern cities were blue collar in character.
I didn't assume it was a blue collar city (in fact, I knew it wasn't a blue collar city). I only noted its high Black poverty rate and said that that should be something to be taken into account. I may get to Columbus later but would like to focus on some other places (Raleigh, Charlotte, etc.) first.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Another thing I'm curious about is (Pre)K-12 schooling. While I know about Malverne Schools on Long Island in the NYC area being a predominately Black district in terms of enrollment with solid test scores and a high graduation rate, what are some other examples in other areas? It isn't going to be just about professionals and single folks, but families have to be considered as well. I'm just saying this in a general sense, by the way.
I agree. Schools matter. That's harder data to assemble though. Unfortunately, I don't have an intern at my disposal.

All in all, however, what's good for the goose is good for the gander. So highly-educated, high-earning Black professionals are more likely to have their kids in higher-rated schools and they are more likely to be raising children in two parent households. It's not so much that we're obsessed with professionals and single folks since many of the members of the creative class are raising families in the suburbs. The data just tells us generally how Black people are faring in different metros.
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Old 10-01-2015, 03:32 PM
 
56,708 posts, read 81,038,544 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I didn't assume it was a blue collar city (in fact, I knew it wasn't a blue collar city). I only noted its high Black poverty rate and said that that should be something to be taken into account. I may get to Columbus later but would like to focus on some other places (Raleigh, Charlotte, etc.) first.



I agree. Schools matter. That's harder data to assemble though. Unfortunately, I don't have an intern at my disposal.

All in all, however, what's good for the goose is good for the gander. So highly-educated, high-earning Black professionals are more likely to have their kids in higher-rated schools and they are more likely to be raising children in two parent households. It's not so much that we're obsessed with professionals and single folks since many of the members of the creative class are raising families in the suburbs. The data just tells us generally how Black people are faring in different metros.
Is that poverty rate for the city or metro in regards to Columbus?
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Old 10-01-2015, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,269 posts, read 26,269,309 times
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The other thing about school district data is that it's harder to make it an apples to apples comparison. For one, school districts are structured differently in different places. How do you compare a school district that covers a few towns to a school district that covers a whole county and nearly 1 million people? Then there's the problem of trying to compare one school to another. I'm not exactly sure how you do that.
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Old 10-01-2015, 03:46 PM
 
29,947 posts, read 27,424,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBoy205 View Post
Well, I'm speaking from a straight side, even though black gays are taking over The Galleria. Lol. No shade though.

Houston has a great black social scene and nightlife compared to its black numbers. Trust me, nightlife in Atlanta and Houston for blacks are neck-in-neck. Numbers don't mean nothing because folks love to tout Atlanta's horn when it's compared to NYC's nightlife, and we all know that NYC's black population is twice the size of Atlanta's. Atlanta and Houston are closer in number than they are to NYC. So, let's not go there, buddy.

You know we're cool now. Lol.
I don't compare Atlanta's nightlife to NYC's because of the very big difference in numbers between the two, so I'm being consistent in my reasoning here. I'm sure you can find any type of scene you want in Houston for Black folks when it comes to nightlife, but again, the sheer difference in the size of the Black population between it and Atlanta makes a difference quantitatively. And I'm just including gay nightlife in overall nightlife, as it is a significant subset. Another one is strip clubs and I'm not sure if Houston has a comparable scene there either.
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Old 10-01-2015, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,269 posts, read 26,269,309 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Is that poverty rate for the city or metro in regards to Columbus?
No. It was for the whole metro. But I made a miscalculation. The Black poverty rate is 29.8%, not 31.9%. Here is more detail (along with some other smaller metros for comparison).

Birmingham - 85,284 (27.0%)
Cincinnati - 85,057 (33.4%)
Columbus, OH - 83,939 (29.8%)
Richmond - 80,247 (22.4%)
Jackson, MS - 74,437 (27.4%)
Baton Rouge - 72,270 (25.3%)
Columbia, SC - 58,918 (23.4%)
Raleigh - 48,923 (20.6%)
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Old 10-01-2015, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,269 posts, read 26,269,309 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I don't compare Atlanta's nightlife to NYC's because of the very big difference in numbers between the two, so I'm being consistent in my reasoning here. I'm sure you can find any type of scene you want in Houston for Black folks when it comes to nightlife, but again, the sheer difference in the size of the Black population between it and Atlanta makes a difference quantitatively. And I'm just including gay nightlife in overall nightlife, as it is a significant subset. Another one is strip clubs and I'm not sure if Houston has a comparable scene there either.
Not only the size, but also the percentage. The Atlanta MSA is 33.5% Black. The Houston MSA is 17.2% Black. What that means at ground level is that Black people are seemingly everywhere in Atlanta. You don't even have to go to a club. Just go to one of the 115,000 W Hotels that have been built in Atlanta since 2009 and you'll see hordes of Black people. Atlanta has more Black people, has a higher Black % than Houston, and has nearly twice as many Black professionals as Houston. I'm not sure why this is even being argued.
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