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Old 10-04-2015, 06:39 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 3,814,134 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Some of those are "hipster" areas and some aren't, but they definitely have character and soul by just about any definition (and again, the list wasn't exhaustive).

Unless you think cookie cutter subdivisions have soul and character?
Only in rare cases, but it's less about the built environment and more about the people and their culture.
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Old 10-04-2015, 07:08 PM
 
52,692 posts, read 75,557,228 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
Many liberals will claim to be open minded, and many conservatives will claim that they are more open-minded than liberals.Both sides do the same thing. I can't refute that Atlanta, Dallas, and Houston are attracting more professional Blacks than anything in Wisconsin.

Interestingly, some of Milwaukee's talented and hardworking are spilling into Chicago. Odd. Chicago sends its worst to other parts of the Midwest, and hardworking people from other parts of the Midwest are moving to Chicago.

FWIW, I know a Black man who is a born and raised Atlanta native. He moved to Chicago after graduating from college.

Wisconsin doesn't sound like a bad state at all in terms of poverty and crime. However, I will mention this. Whenever I mention Wisconsin or Minnesota to some people in Georgia(White or Black), the first thing that comes out of their mouths is "man it's cold up there. Weather could be a big part in it.

It is an issue when the educated and the professionals leave a state, but the poor and unproductive will move there or stay there. However, it is an issue few people want to confront. Maybe some people don't care.
I was thinking that in regards to WI and MN, outside of some possible pockets within the biggest/bigger cities, your best bets in terms of having at least "enough Black people to notice" in middle class areas may be: parts of Brown Deer and maybe parts of Wauwatosa in WI and parts of Brooklyn Center, Brooklyn Park, Hopkins and maybe parts of a few other suburbs in the Twin Cities area of MN. As you may know, but Brown Deer is about 30% Black and both Brooklyn Center and Brooklyn Park are about 25% Black(the 2 municipalities with the highest Black percentages in MN).

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 10-04-2015 at 07:20 PM..
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Old 10-04-2015, 07:15 PM
 
44,633 posts, read 43,151,983 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I was thinking that in regards to WI and MN, outside of some possible pockets within the biggest/bigger cities, your best bets in terms of having at least "enough Black people to notice" in middle class areas may be: Sturtevant, parts of Brown Deer and maybe parts of Wauwatosa in WI and parts of Brooklyn Center, Brooklyn Park, Hopkins and maybe parts of a few other suburbs in the Twin Cities area of MN. As you may know, but Brown Deer is about 30% Black and both Brooklyn Center and Brooklyn Park are about 25% Black(the 2 municipalities with the highest Black percentages in MN).
I do know of Brown Deer. Many middle class Blacks settled in that suburb, as well as Glendale. I have family in Mpls. They have been there since the 1970s. They seem to like it alot.
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Old 10-04-2015, 07:48 PM
 
52,692 posts, read 75,557,228 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Never knew that about Omaha...yikes! The Midwest in particular just doesn't seem to be doing it for Black folks as much these days like it used to.
Yeah, it is weird, as deindustrialization played a part in that. You can still find your highly to predominately Black middle class areas in areas in the region, but they may be in areas you don't think or you don't hear too much about them.

Also, in regards to Omaha, Cathy Hughes, the founder of Radio One and TV One is also an Omaha native.
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Old 10-04-2015, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Detroit
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Quote:
Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
I would agree that political ideology has little to do with it as well. Omaha, by many measures, is more conservative than most cities. There is also an Air Force Base nearby. However, Omaha has among the highest Black homicide rates in the nation, worse than Chicago. Omaha also has one of the poorest African-American populations in the nation. Oddly enough, Omaha has one of the lowest unemployment rates in the nation.

Something else. I know Milwaukee has had some economic issues with the factory jobs going under. Detroit and Pittsburgh went through the same thing. It doesn't surprise me to hear about Black professionals/middle class Blacks leaving Detroit en masse. That has been happening for ages and there has been an en masse migration out of Detroit for over 50 years, much worse than Milwaukee.
Surprisingly, despite the long history of population decline. Detroit's black population didn't decline until the latest census I believe.

Quote:
So far, Columbus,Ohio seems to have the largest Black middle class among Midwestern cities, outside of the Chicago area.
Lol no, Columbus doesn't even come close to Detroit. While both have similar poverty rate percentages, Detroit has over 3 times the number of blacks than Columbus thus, Detroit's middle class is about 3 times larger. I think Cleveland and STL has a larger middle class as well.

But I think it's obvious what the top 10 are for sure. The top 3 is also obvious but 2/3 are very expensive while the other one (Atlanta) is very affordable. Atlanta seems like the easiest place to get on your feet and start from the bottom out of the 3 while NYC and DC is seen as more global and all around great cities your better off having connections or a good paying job lined up or you will end up in the poor house sooner or later.
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Old 10-04-2015, 08:12 PM
 
27,767 posts, read 24,794,631 times
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Originally Posted by Gunion Powder View Post
Only in rare cases, but it's less about the built environment and more about the people and their culture.
Interesting, since you cited Augusta's age as a factor in it having as much soul and character as Atlanta (although a lot of the city burned in the big fire it had in the early 1900's). I also don't see how Augusta's people and culture give it just as much soul and character as Atlanta, but it's all just way too subjective it appears.
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Old 10-04-2015, 08:34 PM
 
52,692 posts, read 75,557,228 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MS313 View Post
Surprisingly, despite the long history of population decline. Detroit's black population didn't decline until the latest census I believe.


Lol no, Columbus doesn't even come close to Detroit. While both have similar poverty rate percentages, Detroit has over 3 times the number of blacks than Columbus thus, Detroit's middle class is about 3 times larger. I think Cleveland and STL has a larger middle class as well.

But I think it's obvious what the top 10 are for sure. The top 3 is also obvious but 2/3 are very expensive while the other one (Atlanta) is very affordable. Atlanta seems like the easiest place to get on your feet and start from the bottom out of the 3 while NYC and DC is seen as more global and all around great cities your better off having connections or a good paying job lined up or you will end up in the poor house sooner or later.
As mentioned earlier in the thread, I think the 2 major TX areas, Chicago, Detroit and Philadelphia are right behind those 3. You have your up and coming areas like Raleigh, Charlotte, Columbus and perhaps a few others(perhaps Indianapolis and Nashville).
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Old 10-04-2015, 09:17 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 3,814,134 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Interesting, since you cited Augusta's age as a factor in it having as much soul and character as Atlanta (although a lot of the city burned in the big fire it had in the early 1900's). I also don't see how Augusta's people and culture give it just as much soul and character as Atlanta, but it's all just way too subjective it appears.
Consider the fact that Atlanta has a far more transient and non-native population. It's hard to get a feel for what's unique about a city when you live in a neighborhood full of people who aren't from there and/or have no vested interest in preserving the local culture. If anything, I would give an edge to hoods like West End/Cascade or Sweet Auburn/O4W, but I don't quite see it for the others.

It really must be subjective, since your antennas might pick up something I don't and vice versa. Overall, though, I got a warmth and genuineness in Augusta that I never felt in Atlanta, which feels remarkably sterile by comparison.
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Old 10-04-2015, 09:23 PM
 
27,767 posts, read 24,794,631 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunion Powder View Post
Consider the fact that Atlanta has a far more transient and non-native population. It's hard to get a feel for what's unique about a city when you live in a neighborhood full of people who aren't from there and/or have no vested interest in preserving the local culture.

If anything, I would give an edge to hoods like West End/Cascade or Sweet Auburn/O4W, but I don't quite see it for the others.
Sure Atlanta is transient but those neighborhoods I mentioned are not (with the exception of Midtown and downtown to a lesser extent); they have tons of long-term residents and attract folks from outside of the neighborhood to take advantage of all that they offer. I'm kinda surprised that you seem unaware of this; did you even frequent those neighborhoods when you lived in Atlanta? And I kinda get the feeling that your definition of "character" and "soul" is limited to Black folks...hope I'm not mistaken on that point.

Also, one thing that I've discovered since I moved to the Philly area (which has all the soul and character you could want in a city) is that those are great attributes to have, but without an influx of enough new blood, such places can feel insular and almost even provincial. While the people are cool and cordial, places with a very strong local culture can also make you feel like you'll never *quite* fit in 100% and a part of you will always feel like an outsider. I think Atlanta has enough of its local culture preserved to an extent in its various inner 'hoods to give it a sense of place, but you also have lots of tranplants that make for a more dynamic, fluid social scene.
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Old 10-04-2015, 09:42 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,473 posts, read 3,006,603 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Yeah, it is weird, as deindustrialization played a part in that. You can still find your highly to predominately Black middle class areas in areas in the region, but they may be in areas you don't think or you don't hear too much about them.

Also, in regards to Omaha, Cathy Hughes, the founder of Radio One and TV One is also an Omaha native.
Congrats on that in producing her, however DC made Cathy Hughes what she is today.
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