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View Poll Results: Which region do you prefer overall?
New England (ME, NH, VT, MA, RI, and CT) 26 35.14%
Mid-Atlantic (NY, NJ, PA, and DE) 48 64.86%
Voters: 74. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-17-2015, 08:49 AM
 
27,713 posts, read 24,737,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
I noted in the beginning that this wasn't intended to start a debate of regional classification.
LOL, this is C-D, you know better.
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Old 09-17-2015, 08:56 AM
 
Location: California x North Carolina (soon)...
3,311 posts, read 2,238,620 times
Reputation: 3656
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
I noted in the beginning that this wasn't intended to start a debate of regional classification. I simply thought it would be interesting to compare/contrast the two sub-regions of the Northeast.

I recognize that areas further south are absolutely part of the Mid-Atlantic, but states such as NY, NJ, PA and DE are definiyely considered to be the northern portion of the Mid-Atlantic region. They're the non- New England Northeast.
No, if you're being consistent with using classic or ancient definitions, you would not list Delaware as "non-New England Northeast"...

Nothing in New York, in real life, is considered Mid-Atlantic. Only very small portions of Jersey or PA are considered Mid-Atlantic. Now, my comment was just a response to another poster's comment, and I don't mean to derail your thread, but when people start saying things like "general acceptance", that has become a part of the conversation and can be responded to, as can anything else that is said....
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Old 09-17-2015, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,265 posts, read 7,187,813 times
Reputation: 3952
Quote:
Originally Posted by murksiderock View Post
Nothing in New York, in real life, is considered Mid-Atlantic. Only very small portions of Jersey or PA are considered Mid-Atlantic. Now, my comment was just a response to another poster's comment, and I don't mean to derail your thread, but when people start saying things like "general acceptance", that has become a part of the conversation and can be responded to, as can anything else that is said....
I think the issue is, and I completely acknowledge it and it has made my comparison confusing, is that there is no super-official definition of "mid-Atlantic." I should have just left it at "Non New-England Northeast."

To get more technical, and perhaps even more historical, my definition is actually connected to the colonial America "Middle Colonies," which no doubt has had some bearing on the term "Mid-Atlantic," although I understand they're not synonymous: The Middle Colonies [ushistory.org].

You can disagree with the way I've defined things--that's okay. I'm not claiming to be absolutely supreme authority.
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Old 09-17-2015, 08:51 PM
 
Location: New Mexico --> Vermont in 2019
9,042 posts, read 17,301,151 times
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I think its an east coast kind of thing to constantly debate about where true regional characteristics and identities lie. I also think the Mid-Atlantic as a region has the most gray area imaginable. I included DC in my post as that's the very center of Mid-Atlantic. But DC in and of itself is so dynamic that some of its regional identities are lost that. That's found found some 45 minutes north in Baltimore which as a city has more local color and identity. But to me, Baltimore is straight up Maryland and anything Mid Atlantic about it is more or less an afterthought. Virginia being first and foremost a southern state muddies the waters of what could be called Mid-Atlantic. New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut are known as the Tri-State area within a certain vicinity and media range of NYC which also sort of dilutes the Mid-Atlantic region's identity. Delaware, well a lot of that's is in Philly's range

New England as a region claims a strong identity. The six New England states are all like siblings. They all bicker about eachother, New Hampshire and Mass constantly berate each other. But when push comes to shove they have each others back. Some of the most loyal Sox and Patriots fans are in NH. The New England identity gets to the point where New England posters want to exile Connecticut from the region for having too many Yankees fans.

Last edited by Desert_SW_77; 09-17-2015 at 09:01 PM..
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Old 09-17-2015, 09:52 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,458 posts, read 2,997,146 times
Reputation: 1939
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
I noted in the beginning that this wasn't intended to start a debate of regional classification. I simply thought it would be interesting to compare/contrast the two sub-regions of the Northeast.

I recognize that areas further south are absolutely part of the Mid-Atlantic, but states such as NY, NJ, PA and DE are definiyely considered to be the northern portion of the Mid-Atlantic region. They're the non- New England Northeast.
Delaware is East of Maryland not North of it. Really only the tip of it that identifies will Philly metro is the only portion of the state that is closer related to NJ/PA.
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Old 09-17-2015, 11:06 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,504 posts, read 2,727,471 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
Delaware is East of Maryland not North of it. Really only the tip of it that identifies will Philly metro is the only portion of the state that is closer related to NJ/PA.
Yea, but that tip of it happens to be run the state and where the majority of the state lives. As an off and on Delawarean of 15 years, this state is much less ambiguous in its regional identity. OP was very much correct in including it in his NE definition. Imo, D.C.and Maryland are also NE, but Delaware for sure.
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Old 09-17-2015, 11:45 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
4,270 posts, read 3,333,628 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by murksiderock View Post
No it isn't! His classification of Mid-Atlantic is one that is antiquated, outdated, and generally unused in normal conversation...

I lived in New York State. It is never referred to by natives as Mid-Atlantic. I spent a lot of time in Central/North Central PA. Same deal...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mid-Atlantic_states

http://www2.census.gov/geo/pdfs/maps.../us_regdiv.pdf

https://www.maps.com/ref_map.aspx?pid=11524

Quote:
I get tired of having these conversations.
But you keep commenting on them though.
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Old 09-18-2015, 12:15 AM
 
Location: California x North Carolina (soon)...
3,311 posts, read 2,238,620 times
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Lol you come in here with your angel wings without reading first. I'm seriously beginning to question your reading comprehension abilities:

1) I said New York is never referred to by natives as Mid-Atlantic. Key word here is natives. I've lived in New York, you haven't---"mid-Atlantic" is not a part of the vocabulary there....
2) seeing how you're not even from the East Coast, I doubt you really have a boots-on-the-ground understanding of what Mid-Atlantic is thought of as, and referred to, in real life, anyway. The best you can do is pull a wiki or maps link....
3) I'm never the one who starts these conversations, ever, in the history of my time here, on geographic designation. If you slow down and re-read my initial post, maybe you'll understand that my response was just a rebuttal to the poster's "generally accepted" comment. Generally accepted by who? Governmental agencies and think tanks are the only ones who use this old, antiquated definition of Mid-Atlantic....

In real life, and by real life I mean by average people whenever the topic is broached, Mid-Atlantic is more less spoken of as the way I've defined it. I'm from the East Coast, I've lived in and traveled extensively in both the Northern and Southern halves of the East Coast, so I'm certainly not taking a wild shot in the dark here, or relying on some confusing definition that has been out of style and popular use longer than I've been living. I'm sure this is hard for you to understand, being from Tennessee....

@q, oh I definitely agree that Delaware is a NE state. My point was if we're going to be consistent to outdated terminology and historical deference, he would have said that Delaware was in the Southern Mid-Atlantic, because historically, it is/was...
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Old 09-18-2015, 12:31 AM
 
Location: California x North Carolina (soon)...
3,311 posts, read 2,238,620 times
Reputation: 3656
@shakeesha, you do realize that that Census map defines Delaware as South Atlantic, and NOT Mid-Atlantic, right? And that maps.com still places it as the southernmost of the Mid-Atlantic, along with Maryland? Lol...its okay...

Like @duderino said, the problem with the Mid-Atlantic term is that the definition was never as set in stone as other regional identifiers. Moreover, it speaks of the larger problem of the American/government habit to define regions by state lines. The Mid-Atlantic, like many other regions throughout this nation, is not cleanly split along state lines. The southernmost region of New Jersey (south of Trenton) may be Mid-Atlantic (although that's arguable), as well as potentially SE Pennsylvania, but certainly cities like Pittsburgh, Erie, Williamsport, and Newark are not culturally of that designation. Likewise, while the Richmond, Tidewater, and Eastern Shore areas likely fit the modern definition, Roanoke and Danville certainly don't, and neither does West Virginia, a state that is nearly entirely mountainous with no link the the Atlantic whatsoever...

My only issue is that most people who bring these topics up are clearly unfamiliar with the present-day cultural meaning of the term, and likely have never lived in the supposed mid-Atlantic states. Familiarity with the areas in question goes a long way.
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Old 09-18-2015, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
4,270 posts, read 3,333,628 times
Reputation: 3001
Quote:
Originally Posted by murksiderock View Post
Lol you come in here with your angel wings without reading first. I'm seriously beginning to question your reading comprehension abilities:

1) I said New York is never referred to by natives as Mid-Atlantic. Key word here is natives. I've lived in New York, you haven't---"mid-Atlantic" is not a part of the vocabulary there....
2) seeing how you're not even from the East Coast, I doubt you really have a boots-on-the-ground understanding of what Mid-Atlantic is thought of as, and referred to, in real life, anyway. The best you can do is pull a wiki or maps link....
3) I'm never the one who starts these conversations, ever, in the history of my time here, on geographic designation. If you slow down and re-read my initial post, maybe you'll understand that my response was just a rebuttal to the poster's "generally accepted" comment. Generally accepted by who? Governmental agencies and think tanks are the only ones who use this old, antiquated definition of Mid-Atlantic....

In real life, and by real life I mean by average people whenever the topic is broached, Mid-Atlantic is more less spoken of as the way I've defined it. I'm from the East Coast, I've lived in and traveled extensively in both the Northern and Southern halves of the East Coast, so I'm certainly not taking a wild shot in the dark here, or relying on some confusing definition that has been out of style and popular use longer than I've been living. I'm sure this is hard for you to understand, being from Tennessee....

@q, oh I definitely agree that Delaware is a NE state. My point was if we're going to be consistent to outdated terminology and historical deference, he would have said that Delaware was in the Southern Mid-Atlantic, because historically, it is/was...
All of your rant, name-calling, and character assassination still doesn't change the fact that New York is a Mid-Atlantic state. It is ok to admit when you are wrong.
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