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Old 01-08-2018, 06:23 AM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
4,291 posts, read 2,142,413 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
I guess I just assumed that it was common knowledge in The US that DC sits on the Virginia/Maryland border, kind of like how people know that NYC sits on the NJ border (at least I think that’s common knowledge, right?). I don’t even know anymore. I guess what you were saying is correct. A lot of things that locals assume are well-known are actually unknown to most people.

I do want to point out that a lot of famous landmarks and places that people associate with DC and mistakenly believe to be in DC are actually in Maryland or Virginia. Ex:

NSA — Maryland
Pentagon — Virginia
Arlington national cemetery — Virginia
CIA — Virginia
FedEx Field (Redskins Stadium) — Maryland
Reagan airport — Virginia

I’m sure I missed a bunch too. These are things that every American knows, I guess it’s just not common knowledge they’re not actually located in DC proper. People probably visit some of these places as tourists and probably don’t even realize this.
One example I can think of in media is the show American Dad. The main character works for the CIA and it’s commonly mentioned throughout the show that they live in Langley, Virginia — where the CIA is located.
the statue of liberty is on liberty island most people dont know what it is -- they usually mistakenly think that its on ellis island.
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Old 01-08-2018, 06:27 AM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
4,291 posts, read 2,142,413 times
Reputation: 2612
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
I bet the majority know that DC is between VA and MD. But we don't know much about Delaware or anything on or about the peninsula.
the d in dmv is d.c., not delaware (was confused by that-one-guys #97 as well). its not obvious because shouldnt the acronym then be (ordered from north to south): md-d.c.-va ?

most adults have drivers licenses so without context they associate the dmv with their local department of motor vehicles.

most of these examples stem from a hyper-inflated sense of self. there was an example many posts ago about someone saying something about public schools failing our children because they didnt know that kentucky has suburbs of cincinati -- if youve never been to cincinati, then most will not exert the effort to memorize that random fact.
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Old 01-08-2018, 06:54 AM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
4,687 posts, read 3,723,126 times
Reputation: 3337
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicagoland60426 View Post
Flyover Country
Rustbelt
Sunbelt
Definitely this^ and cities in the north being called townships rather than just the name of the cities, themselves. Also, the cities ending in chester in the north east. The city of Miami Beach being completely separate from Miami. Jacksonville being the largest city by land area in the United States. Ugly racial tension and segregation in major Midwestern cities smh... People living happily in Alaska.
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Old 01-08-2018, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,086 posts, read 1,211,337 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stanley-88888888 View Post
the d in dmv is d.c., not delaware (was confused by that-one-guys #97 as well). its not obvious because shouldnt the acronym then be (ordered from north to south): md-d.c.-va ?
I am aware that the “D” in “DMV” is for DC but I was speaking about the DelMarVa peninsula which is something else. It is the peninsula that Delaware sits on and borders the Eastern part of Maryland. And the very bottom of the peninsula is part of Virginia. I’ve been there many times, but never knew there was a name for it “DelMarVa Penninsula” until coming to city data.


Image source: Virginiaplaces.org
Eastern Shore
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Old 01-08-2018, 10:28 AM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,263 posts, read 1,058,863 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
I bet the majority know that DC is between VA and MD. But we don't know much about Delaware or anything on or about the peninsula.
Yeah, of course I knew DC sat between VA and MD, I just didn't know the name for the area was DMV, much the same as prior to living in DFW that it was called DFW or the Metroplex, prior to that I just knew it as Dallas.

DMV doesn't even make sense as an acronym because the letters are in the wrong order, plus it is already one for the "Department of Motor Vehicles"

Delaware is kinda weird to me, it doesn't seem to have any reason to exist in its current boundaries and isn't a large enough place in area or population to seem to need to be independent. it's like the quarter of a peninsula that it shares with 2 other states to which the peninsula isn't the main part of the other states.
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Old 01-08-2018, 10:54 AM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,263 posts, read 1,058,863 times
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I think perhaps even more interesting than the things you lean about though CD is how people learn about places outside of CD.

I would like to assume that everyone who passed 4th grade can name all 50 states and capitals and should be able to label a blank map of the country without more than a couple mistakes, but I know that isn't the case at all.

So how do most people know about places they they personally have not visited? Watching Sports? Movies and TV shows?

I know the main reason I can name all the major Canadian cities is because I follow the NHL.

I know I personally have always had an interest in maps, but I know that isn't a widespread interest, besides, it is easy to still have holes in knowledge about places you've never taken time to check out. Hampton Roads is a great example for this for me personally, I'm sure I have seen it on maps before joining this site, but it never registered as important to me because it wasn't the State Capital, has no sports teams, and I don't think I've ever seen a movie set there.

On the other hand, I was aware of Charleston which is a smaller metro area that I have never been to.
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Old 01-08-2018, 11:08 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
6,952 posts, read 9,653,741 times
Reputation: 6224
Quote:
Originally Posted by leilaniguy View Post
I used to have a friend from Fort Worth who referred to it as the Dalworth metroplex.
If I was from Fort Worth, then I would be calling the Dallas/Fort Worth Area as the "Fort Worth Metro Area".
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Old 01-08-2018, 11:16 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
6,952 posts, read 9,653,741 times
Reputation: 6224
Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
I think perhaps even more interesting than the things you lean about though CD is how people learn about places outside of CD.

I would like to assume that everyone who passed 4th grade can name all 50 states and capitals and should be able to label a blank map of the country without more than a couple mistakes, but I know that isn't the case at all.

So how do most people know about places they they personally have not visited? Watching Sports? Movies and TV shows?

I know the main reason I can name all the major Canadian cities is because I follow the NHL.

I know I personally have always had an interest in maps, but I know that isn't a widespread interest, besides, it is easy to still have holes in knowledge about places you've never taken time to check out. Hampton Roads is a great example for this for me personally, I'm sure I have seen it on maps before joining this site, but it never registered as important to me because it wasn't the State Capital, has no sports teams, and I don't think I've ever seen a movie set there.

On the other hand, I was aware of Charleston which is a smaller metro area that I have never been to.
That is how I first began to learn the names of the big cities, it was the cities with the professional sports teams. And the biggest cities often had teams in all 4 major sports; baseball, football, basketball and hockey. Of course today I realize it is more complicated than that.

Btw, your not the only map junkie on here LOL.
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Old 01-08-2018, 11:24 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
6,952 posts, read 9,653,741 times
Reputation: 6224
As for the OP question, I never heard of DMV for the Washington DC area, the "City" for San Francisco or perhaps surprisingly because it is kind of close, the Delaware Valley for Philadelphia until I came to City-Data.

Someone mentioned Hampton Roads, which I admit is a very unusual name for that part of southeastern Virginia. However, Civil War and Revolutionary war buffs would probably have heard of it. Roads is an old English word for a safe harbor and Hampton is one of the older communities in that area.
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Old 01-13-2018, 04:58 PM
JJG
 
Location: Fort Worth
13,147 posts, read 18,850,617 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leilaniguy View Post
I used to have a friend from Fort Worth who referred to it as the Dalworth metroplex.
"Dalworth"?

That's a cleaning company.
https://i.ytimg.com/vi/-RFm5TOlDbg/maxresdefault.jpg

You mean Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex...

Last edited by JMT; 12-26-2018 at 06:34 AM..
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