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Old 09-26-2015, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
2,575 posts, read 3,337,258 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dacoolguy View Post
How so? We're talking city limits and not metro.

Portland
Land: 133 Sq mi
Population: 619,360 (2014 est)

Atlanta
Land: 131 Sq mi
Population: 447,841

Basically Portland has a bigger population. How does that throw comparisons off?
Then Atlanta by far. It has a much larger downtown, multiple large business districts, more large downtown attractions, a subway versus light rail, many more tourists and conventions, more sports teams, a much larger airport, larger freeways, more traffic, more jobs, more high rises, much taller high rises. Much more of a big city feel imo.
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Old 09-26-2015, 01:13 PM
 
6,612 posts, read 6,554,251 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2Easy View Post
Then Atlanta by far. It has a much larger downtown, multiple large business districts, more large downtown attractions, a subway versus light rail, many more tourists and conventions, more sports teams, a much larger airport, larger freeways, more traffic, more jobs, more high rises, much taller high rises. Much more of a big city feel imo.
Exactly. If we're going by city-limits only, Atlanta is much larger (even with a smaller population) because it serves a much larger metro population.
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Old 09-26-2015, 02:08 PM
 
1,337 posts, read 1,158,492 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GatsbyGatz View Post
To sidetrack this conversation, it is interesting to note that Portland has really, really tiny city blocks. This has the advantage of creating a very walkable street grid.
Here are a few links on block size that are interesting:

Optimizing The St. Grid: Optimizing the Street Grid

Midwest & NW Block Size: twin city sidewalks: Comparing the Small Blocks of the Midwest and the Northwest

Pound for pound I'd say Portland.
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Old 11-02-2015, 01:52 AM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
4,290 posts, read 3,361,722 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Port Pitt Ash View Post
Here are a few links on block size that are interesting:

Optimizing The St. Grid: Optimizing the Street Grid

Midwest & NW Block Size: twin city sidewalks: Comparing the Small Blocks of the Midwest and the Northwest

Pound for pound I'd say Portland.
What do you mean?
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Old 11-02-2015, 05:52 AM
 
Location: SF Bay Area (formerly DC and Boston)
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I love walking around Portland because you don't have to walk over four lanes of traffic to cross most of the streets. See the same thing in Philadelphia on Walnut St and Rittenhouse Sq., and the North End of Boston. Small blocks encourage you to walk. Meanwhile, Midtown Atlanta has Atlantic Station, and it's hard to think of any place with piped-in music and mall cops as "urban".
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Old 11-02-2015, 08:50 AM
 
27,786 posts, read 24,850,281 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheseGoTo11 View Post
I love walking around Portland because you don't have to walk over four lanes of traffic to cross most of the streets. See the same thing in Philadelphia on Walnut St and Rittenhouse Sq., and the North End of Boston. Small blocks encourage you to walk. Meanwhile, Midtown Atlanta has Atlantic Station, and it's hard to think of any place with piped-in music and mall cops as "urban".
If AS is the most urban thing to you about Midtown, then I'm guessing you haven't actually experienced Midtown.
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Old 11-02-2015, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
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Most of you have probably never been to Portland. If you have you would know Portland is more urban. No matter how many downtowns Atlanta has or how big it's airport is or that it has a subway, Portland is clearly more urban. Googling street pics does nothing. Go there and walk the streets and you will clearly see Portland is more urban.
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Old 11-02-2015, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas
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Going by metro population, wide freeways and skylines. Atlanta!

Looking at vibrancy of streetlife, walkability and sense of neighborhoods. Portland!

Driving into Atlanta you would expect a scene similar to Chicago, Philly and Boston. The moment you get off the freeway its like what the heck.
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Old 11-02-2015, 12:03 PM
 
3,466 posts, read 2,589,690 times
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Portland is more urban, in terms of street activity, etc. like others have said.

But I'd say Atlanta has more big city amenities (airport, pretty good rail not sure how it compares to Portland, better museums, more pro sports, more history, larger footprint, more skyline, etc.)
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Old 11-02-2015, 12:10 PM
 
213 posts, read 177,600 times
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It's Portland and it's not even close:

Portland - Downtown and Inner Neighborhoods look like this (these are not the main streets and not cherry-picked):
https://www.google.com/maps/@45.5199...8i6656!6m1!1e1

https://www.google.com/maps/@45.5239...7i13312!8i6656

Atlanta - Downtown and Midtown look like this (again, not the main streets and not cherry picked):
https://www.google.com/maps/@33.7626...8i6656!6m1!1e1

https://www.google.com/maps/@33.7807...7i13312!8i6656


Also, outer neighborhoods Portlands has many human-scale walkable corridors like this:
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Th...172954!6m1!1e1

While most of Atlanta's outer neighborhoods (And I'm being generous here) look like this:
https://www.google.com/maps/@33.7769...8i6656!6m1!1e1

Atlanta is more cosmopolitan and more vibrant, but in terms of urbanity and looking at built environment, pedestrian experience, accessibility of retail, restaurants, and bars, Portland takes this one easily. (Yes, I know Atlanta has a more lively nightlife, but Portland has a higher quantity and concentration of bars).
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